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it occurred to me,

besides the aforementioned scenes in THE GREAT LIE and JEZEBEL, I can think of a couple of other Bette Davis films from her prime that included black characters, one in a similarly patronizing (but well intended) fashion (THE LITTLE FOXES) and one that handles it right (!) and is (to this day) rather prescient, and that would be IN THIS OUR LIFE, in which Bette gives a failed, but fascinating, performance as a woman who allows a black youth to be charged for a hit and run she is responsible for.

maybe i give Bette too much "credit", but i sometimes wonder if this leitmotif in her work was a result of her well intended progressive on-set input.

either way, at least some black actors got a check out of it.

 

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45 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

it occurred to me,

besides the aforementioned scenes in THE GREAT LIE and JEZEBEL, I can think of a couple of other Bette Davis films from her prime that included black characters, one in a similarly patronizing (but well intended) fashion (THE LITTLE FOXES) and one that handles it right (!) and is (to this day) rather prescient, and that would be IN THIS OUR LIFE, in which Bette gives a failed, but fascinating, performance as a woman who allows a black youth to be charged for a hit and run she is responsible for.

maybe i give Bette too much "credit", but i sometimes wonder if this leitmotif in her work was a result of her well intended progressive on-set input.

either way, at least some black actors got a check out of it.

 

True.

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The Florida Project (2017) - Indie slice-of-life drama from A24 and director Sean Baker. Set in Orlando, Florida, the story follows single mother Halley (Bria Vinaite) and her young daughter Moonee (Brooklynn KImberly Prince) as they struggle to survive. They live week-to-week in a tacky tourist hotel gone to seed managed by the compassionate Bobby (Willem Dafoe), who tries to help the various misfits and rejects that occupy the place. Things are looking bad for Halley, though, as she's lost her stripper job and her options are looking more and more limited, while the often-unsupervised Moonee gets into all sorts of trouble. Also featuring Christopher Rivera, Valeria Cotto, Josie Olivo, Mela Murder, Caleb Landry Jones, and Macon Blair.

Can a movie give you food poisoning? This one seemed to, as I came down with the worst case of the affliction that I've ever had the misfortune of experiencing approximately 45 minutes into watching this last night. I spent the next 12 hours getting repeatedly, violently ill. I eventually finished the movie in short chunks, when biology would allow, but I doubt I'll be able to separate the two experiences in my mind. Getting sick isn't entirely out of sync with the movie, though, as the lifestyles and behaviors on display are often nauseous to view. I'm sure director Baker wants the audience to sympathize with these people living on the wretched edge only feet away from the tourist capital of the US, to think about the dichotomy of the overly-colorful, often grotesque architecture like something out of a child's dream serving as a backdrop for the struggles of the poor, and especially how it effects their kids. But often the film comes across as an illustration of how modern Western society has collapsed, and the only ones to truly blame are ourselves. The misbehaving Moonee is not much of a surprise when her mother is such a car-wreck. Halley is her own worst enemy. Willem Dafoe has won many supporting actor awards already for this movie, and at first he seemed like a shoo-in for a long-deserved Oscar. However, the momentum now seems to favor Sam Rockwell in Three Billboards instead. I haven't seen that one yet, but after watching this movie, I can't really see why Dafoe was nominated. He's not bad at all, but there's nothing to his role that seems worthy of the acclaim.    (6/10)

Source: Lionsgate DVD.

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What ever happened to the "Circle pin"? It used to be so popular! I own a few.

Lawrence said: I came down with the worst case of the affliction that I've ever had the misfortune of experiencing approximately 45 minutes into watching this last night. I spent the next 12 hours getting repeatedly, violently ill. I eventually finished the movie in short chunks

Great choice of words-LOL! I had that 2 weeks ago, caught up on TV/DVR viewing!

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I had it last week (as did much of the office), and then my dad got it over the weekend.

I finally got around to watching several movies off my DVR.  That and my DVD of It Always Rains on Sunday.

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30 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

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What ever happened to the "Circle pin"? It used to be so popular! I own a few.

Lawrence said: I came down with the worst case of the affliction that I've ever had the misfortune of experiencing approximately 45 minutes into watching this last night. I spent the next 12 hours getting repeatedly, violently ill. I eventually finished the movie in short chunks

Great choice of words-LOL! I had that 2 weeks ago, caught up on TV/DVR viewing!

I think they are still around. Pins seem to have gone out of fashion. Too bad.

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3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Florida Project (2017) -

Can a movie give you food poisoning? This one seemed to, as I came down with the worst case of the affliction that I've ever had the misfortune of experiencing approximately 45 minutes into watching this last night. I spent the next 12 hours getting repeatedly, violently ill. I eventually finished the movie in short chunks,

I'm getting sick just imagining that visual ...

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11 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

...and, lest we forget, there was also that period in the 1970s where she joined The Black Panthers.

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(love the Brooch)

Have you watched this interview? This interview is fascinating.  I could listen to Bette Davis talk about her life and Hollywood all day. Plus, I loved how "hip" she looked: black beret, black sweater, black mini skirt, black go-go boots, the big glasses the brooch, she looked awesome!

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East of Fifth Avenue-1933, Columbia: There was very little info available on this film, and I had never heard of it, but found it very watchable, packed with interwoven stories of various boarders in a rooming house... and a bit of a tear jerker.  Despite billing, Dorothy Tree is the 'star', a chorus line dancer with a problem..she's pregnant and unmarried..and considering the time of the film, this is all very open (although the 'p' word isn't spoken).  She hopes upon his return, the fellow she loves, Wallace Ford, will marry her, but when he brings home a frilly southern belle wife, Tree is crushed. Harry Holman plays a con-man, who promises Lucien Littlefield hair growth and his landlady, Maude Eburne, a turtle that doubles in size every week (if fed a secret diet he will give her if she forgets his back rent).  The hair falls out, the turtle does grow (it doesn't really, this is kind of funny), and Ford's bride becomes smitten by a would-be overly dramatic novelist, Walter Byron. The pace is quick, and there isn't a wasted scene,  but at the heart of the multiple individual melodramas is the 'calm' of an elderly couple-- Walter Connolly and Louise Carter..just weeks from their 50th anniversary, and dreaming of returning to England one more time to a home they finally own. The other boarders are like children they never had, and they see and accept all their shortcomings.  The ending is bittersweet, hard lessons are learned, and through death comes new understandings.  I watched this on the Classic Reel app on Roku, and the print was surprisingly good.  A great little forgotten drama.                                                                                                      Related image

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

Have you watched this interview? This interview is fascinating.  I could listen to Bette Davis talk about her life and Hollywood all day. Plus, I loved how "hip" she looked: black beret, black sweater, black mini skirt, black go-go boots, the big glasses the brooch, she looked awesome!

This still from the interview I mentioned in another thread. It's the interview where Bette Davis said how wicked and stupid it was for young women of her era to be brought up to wait until after marriage before having sex with someone they really loved.

I agree that the entire interview is so fascinating. 

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from time to time, they show THE BETTE DAVIS DICK CAVETT INTERVIEW on TCM, and they totally should. It's one of her best performances.

Those boots are TDF.

My 8 year old niece was over once and it was on TCM and she was fascinated. i made it a teachable moment by telling her that this WHAT A MOVIE STAR LOOKED LIKE and this was why she should not smoke, because the lady on the television was only 28 years old at the time.

yeah, i fudged a little. but i got the point across.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

from time to time, they show THE BETTE DAVIS DICK CAVETT INTERVIEW on TCM, and they totally should. It's one of her best performances.

Those boots are TDF.

My 8 year old niece was over once and it was on TCM and she was fascinated. i made it a teachable moment by telling her that this WHAT A MOVIE STAR LOOKED LIKE and this was why she should not smoke, because the lady on the television was only 28 years old at the time.

yeah, i fudged a little. but i got the point across.

Showing children sound clips and stills of classic Hollywood actresses (and some actors) as they aged would make a great anti-smoking campaign.  Even though Barbara Stanwyck still had amazing looking skin when she was older, her voice got very deep in her old age, same thing goes for Lucille Ball. Or heck, show them a current photo of Lindsay Lohan--drugs are bad, m'kay? 

Then there are actors with numerous vices, like Spencer Tracy, who would be an ineffective visual aid toward the dangers of smoking... because he always looked old! Even in his 1930s movies, when we would have been in his 30s, he looked like he was in his late-40s/early 50s! 

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Next to "ladies in prison" and "teen beach movies," "overwrought teen melodramas" are probably my next favorite subgenre of film.  Monday night, I watched Susan Slade, which had everything I could hope for in a teen-oriented melodrama.  Susan Slade starred Connie Francis (no doubt another studio's attempt at finding their own Sandra Dee-esque type personality) as 17-year old Susan Slade who up until the beginning of the film, had led a sheltered life as the only daughter of Dorothy McGuire (who seems to be a regular in these types of films) and Lloyd Nolan (I chuckled when I saw he was in this film.  This was just hours after having the 'Who is Lloyd Nolan?' discussion here on the boards).  Throughout the film, Francis deals with her first crush, losing her virginity, teen pregnancy, tragic deaths, an illegitimate baby, babies lighting themselves on fire, a love triangle, class warfare...everything you could want in a melodrama. 

At the beginning of the film, while on the ship from Chile to Monterey, CA, Francis falls in love with (and loses her virginity to, and consequently becomes pregnant by) a wealthy young mountain climber named Conn.  Mother McGuire at the beginning is pushing Francis into pursuing a relationship with Conn, but after Francis comes home at like 4am from an onboard party (where they are playing "A Theme from A Summer Place" in the background), McGuire tells Francis that she's not too sure about Conn.  Francis continue their onboard romance anyway, in fact, the love-making comes after McGuire voices her concerns, so I'm sure that Francis' rendezvous with Conn was partially out of rebellion.  Francis and Conn want to marry, but Conn wants to wait until he returns from his Mt. McKinley mountain climbing trip (uh oh... foreshadowing!). 

In Monterey, Francis, McGuire and Lloyd are put up in a home owned by their friends, Brian Aherne, Mrs. Lovey Howell (aka Natalie Schaffer) and son Bert Convy. McGuire and Lloyd are pushing for Francis to get together with Convy.  However, he and Francis really have nothing in common and Convy is one of those guys who thinks that he can just throw money around and get whatever (and whomever) he wants.  Francis isn't interested.  Convy then buys Francis a horse, which she loves.  She goes down to the local stables to meet her horse and also meets the stable hand played by Troy Donahue (foreshadowing!).  Donahue is of a lesser social status than Convy and even Francis for that matter, but he's more genuine than Convy and not a snob.  The Convy-Francis-Donahue triangle is the main action of the film.

Shortly after moving to Monterey, Francis finds out she's pregnant.  The father is her former paramour, Conn, from the ship.  Francis tearfully tells McGuire about her predicament.  McGuire decides that the only reasonable thing to do is to move away before the baby is born.  They will then return after the baby comes and McGuire will pretend that her daughter's son is her own.  This scheme will protect Francis' reputation and hide the fact that the baby is illegitimate.  Francis' father, Lloyd, despite having retired, takes a temporary 2 year assignment in Guatemala.  The family leaves and returns with the new baby, Rogie.  

Back at home, Aherne and Mrs. Howell coo and aww over "McGuire's baby," even going as far as to remodel their home giving McGuire a mother suite and setting up a separate apartment on the property for Francis.  Francis resents not being able to mother her baby and even begins to resent her mother for insisting on maintaining the charade. Meanwhile, Convy and Donahue are still pursuing her. 

Typically in these types of movies, you know how it's going to end, so there aren't typically any surprises.  I just love all the drama, anguish, emotion, just every over-the-top thing that can happen to these poor characters.  These types of films are so much fun. I think A Summer Place is still my favorite teen melodrama, but Susan Slade was also a fun film to watch.

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15 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Have you watched this interview? This interview is fascinating.  I could listen to Bette Davis talk about her life and Hollywood all day. Plus, I loved how "hip" she looked: black beret, black sweater, black mini skirt, black go-go boots, the big glasses the brooch, she looked awesome!

Yes. I think I've seen all of her Tonight Show/Dick Cavett show appearances in her later years......

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8 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

CAGED is coming on tomorrow at 6:45 am, God only knows what time that is in the Northwest.

FYI tho

I have my own copy! Lol. It’s on at 3:45 am here. Lol. 

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The Green Hornet (1940) - 13-chapter action serial from Universal Pictures and directors Ford Beebe and Ray Taylor. Wealthy heir Britt Reid (Gordon Jones) takes over his father's newspaper empire and soon realizes that the city is being overwhelmed by crime and corruption. He decides to become a Robin Hood-like character to fight crime and root out the sinister players behind the scenes. With the help of loyal valet Kato (Keye Luke), he constructs a super-powered car called the Black Beauty, a special pistol that fires knockout gas, and the masked persona of the Green Hornet. He sets out to stop various crime rackets (insurance fraud, ballot stuffing, industrial sabotage), all the while searching for the mastermind behind it all. Also featuring Anne Nagel, Wade Boteler, Phillip Trent, Cy Kendall, Stanley Andrews, Selmer Jackson, Joseph Crehan, Walter McGrail, Gene Rizzi, Ann Doran, and Alan Ladd.

The Green Hornet had been a hit radio show for several years, and would continue on for many more. The reasoning behind why he's called Green Hornet is a bit dubious: the radio show producer wanted to utilize an insect buzzing sound, while in the serial it's explained that Reid and Kato encountered a giant green hornet in the jungles of South America. The buzz is used in the serial too, a continuous drone heard emanating from the Black Beauty car which would no doubt get extremely annoying for anyone traveling in the car, let alone warning potential enemies that you were approaching. Maybe not the best idea. Jones makes for a great square-jawed hero, but whenever he dons his full-face mask, his voice is dubbed by Al Hodge from the radio show. The set-ups in this serial make it a little easier to binge watch, as each chapter or two covers a specific criminal racket and gang, therefore acting like stand alone episodes of a TV show. Released in January of 1940, this proved popular enough for Universal to rush a sequel serial into production in time for it to be released that same year.   (7/10)

Source: VCI DVD, with very nice picture quality.

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16 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Have you watched this interview? This interview is fascinating.  I could listen to Bette Davis talk about her life and Hollywood all day. Plus, I loved how "hip" she looked: black beret, black sweater, black mini skirt, black go-go boots, the big glasses the brooch, she looked awesome!

I believe I've seen this on the Decades Channel and it is a great interview. Too bad Ms. Davis wouldn't reveal the actor she had to smooch that has such awful breath!

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

CAGED is coming on tomorrow at 6:45 am, God only knows what time that is in the Northwest.

FYI tho

Fortunately I have the DVD so I can watch it anytime I want.

Great women in prison film BTW. Eleanor Parker is just brilliant in it. 

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1 hour ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Fortunately I have the DVD so I can watch it anytime I want.

Great women in prison film BTW. Eleanor Parker is just brilliant in it. 

I taped it one time.  I remember seeing it on TV when I was 10 or 11 in the early 60s.  It made quite an impact! 

Eleanor Parker and all the others delivered a compelling performance.

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Green Hornet (1940) - 13-chapter action serial from Universal Pictures and directors Ford Beebe and Ray Taylor. Wealthy heir Britt Reid (Gordon Jones) takes over his father's newspaper empire and soon realizes that the city is being overwhelmed by crime and corruption. He decides to become a Robin Hood-like character to fight crime and root out the sinister players behind the scenes. With the help of loyal valet Kato (Keye Luke),

The reasoning behind why he's called Green Hornet is a bit dubious: the radio show producer wanted to utilize an insect buzzing sound, while in the serial it's explained that Reid and Kato encountered a giant green hornet in the jungles of South America.

Also, on the radio show, Britt Reid was the great-great-etc. grand-nephew of John Reid, aka the Lone Ranger, and was still in the present day family business of masked-avenging, with faithful ethnic companions and "silver" steeds.

(And on the 60's TV show, he fired a paralyzing dart from his gun as "Hornet sting", although I don't know if that's canon.)

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