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7 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

what's a flyaway?

They are strands of hair that "escaped" the hairstyle.  I think her hair is supposed to be a sleek bun, but because of all the loose hairs, her hairstyle looks frizzy. 

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

I was a member of the DVD-by-mail service for several years, even at the 10-at-a-time level. Then they introduced the streaming service, and I started noticing what EricJ was talking about: more and more discs in my queue were being reported damaged/lost and wait-listed, with no replacements being made.

The Pros: The picture looks good, a crisp, sharp HD, and there is 5.1 sound on most titles, which I like as I have surround sound systems. The ease of navigation, even using the TV cable remote, is very good. There has been no "buffering" or stop-and-start issues as of yet, and I've watched over a dozen movies and TV shows. 

The Cons: The selection is rather awful. There are next to no classic film choices, and the majority of the movies are bargain basement horror and science fiction of the direct-to-video variety. There are also a lot of obscure indie films and several big Hollywood titles, but they are all from the last 5 to ten years, with the majority from the last 3 years or so. The ratio of TV to film is also leaning more heavily on TV, which I'm not as interested in. I quickly watched all of the TV they had to offer that I was interested in.

Most people are still in love with Instant Netflix for movies because they either A) remember the mail service, or B ) joined in 2010, when it was a free bonus with your mail service, and there actually WERE a few movies on the catalog.  Although half of those were on loan from StarzPlay, which had a nice healthy catalog of mainstream Hollywood features, but in very shoddy SD that customers always blamed Netflix for.  And in March 2011, you may remember the industry press suddenly panicking over, quote, "Netflix-geddon":  StarzPlay broke their ties with Netflix and took their movies with them, and more than 200 titles disappeared off the service overnight.  Guess what, folks...Thought Netflix was digitizing all their own disks and they'd all be there forever?  First hard lesson.  You literally heard people a year before saying "I sold my disk collection because Netflix has it all!", and a year later, there was screaming and tearing of hair.

Of course, up to that point, the industry had literally been ignoring the idea of streaming.  Streaming wasn't very good quality in 2010, almost nobody owned a Roku, and Amazon, Hulu and Crackle were all trying to sell their own service on desktop-browser, thinking we'd watch them on our hip, trendy young cellphones.  If you got a "Digital copy" with your DVD, it was usually a little downloadable file to play on your iPod Video or other portable device, because that was all there was for video before the iPad, and back when Kindle was still black-&-white.  Netflix had come up with the idea of putting their streaming service on game consoles, smart-TV's and AppleTV's for the living room, and once the studios discovered streaming, all of a sudden the idea of only getting paid for them once a month, while everyone watched them as many times as they wanted for free, got a lot less popular.

Now, let's be honest, NOBODY's bought digital-purchase movies:  I didn't, you haven't, and let's see a show of hands of how many people never even got around to redeeming those free disk codes from their Blu-rays, because they didn't know why they'd ever need one.  But studios had to blame somebody, and all of a sudden, "the popularity of Instant Netflix" was the main scapegoat, and the chief threat to the future of studios selling all their movies on Digital.  So they stopped licensing their movies to the Enemy...Starve the camels, they thought, and they'll come find the watering holes on their own.

I could go on, but basically now you know why the Con:  The selection IS awful, because  the gold-rush town went bust when the mine ran out--We have four or five services that all wanted to go big-time, but are now stuck with one big pool of public-domain movies to choose from, and all scramble to be the one to sell the same product as the other.  Until Disney starts their own service with their own movies in their own pocket, we have third-party services the studios won't talk to anymore, and have to run the same limited package of MGM/UA movies that also fell into public domain.  Unless you're Netflix, of course, and can also dig up some British, Mexican, Indian and South Korean programming for lack of anything else to show.  And maybe Adam Sandler will make some more Original programming.

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Our grown kids think that DVDs are in the past, because of movies on the computer.

That's because your grown kids aren't "active seniors". Wait until THEY fall asleep & miss the endings of movies! A DVD is a heck of a lot easier to re-queue to the last 15 minutes of a movie to re-watch than anything streamed!

Plus, us old timers like our super BIG screen-I won't watch movies on my 18" computer monitor-ew.
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When I first got Netflix I was hoping it would be like the Library of Alexandria of film, with all the extant avaiable titles on DVD to choose from. I originally got the disc service then went to both. I still have that, but now with streaming I'm not limited to Netflix's shrinking classics list. I can stream whatever I can find, Movies, old TV shows, to the 55 inch screen. I use Youtube (free), and Kanopy (available through your local library, usually limited to 10 titles per month), Dailymotion has films, also Archive. Org. Always search the films English title first, then try it's various foreign titles, A lot of times they will be in English with foreign subtitles, but hey if thats the only way to watch it for free, I not going to complain.

But if it's a film I want to own I buy the disc, you never know when the streaming content will dissappear. But streaming is a good way to judge if the film is to your tastes and worth buying. Always check to make sure the disc is Region free and has English as a language option. The only caveat to Region free discs is that their menue usually pops up in the language of the country of origin. You just have to navigate to English.  

But I also have a Region Free Bluray/DVD player, that plays discs from all over the world whatever region, and it like Roku or chromecast it also streams content.

Just go to Amazon.uk, Amazon.fr, Amazon.de, Amazon.au, Amazon.it and search for out of print titles, I go to a films IMDb page and see it's foreign titles and put them in the search. Again always check the info for languages to make sure English is an option or English subtitles.

There is also a big market out there for DVDr's of out of print stuff, you'd be surprised of what you can find or have made. 

 

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The Naked City (1948) New York Policier Noir Masterpiece

Naked%2BCity%2BPoster%2Bcase%2Bcover.jpg

Hollywood gave us it's slick, artistic ersatz New York cleverly weaving skimpily lit, dark back lot sets, and matte painted backdrops with second unit footage and often has downtown L.A. subbing in for many US cities.

This film is the real deal, shot on the sidewalks, the streets, The neighborhoods the els, the bridges. They used real New Yorkers, capturing them with two way mirrors and hidden cameras, as extras, playing what else, real New Yorkers. It's a film loaded with New York City archetypes some frozen in time others now long gone, and it's brimming with three second vignettes that illustrate scenes from hardboiled stories never filmed. There, is the milkman and his horse Mamie, from Cornell Woolrich's "Mamie 'n' Me," or the rickety rattling el going through the Coneties Slip "S" curve recalling his "Death in The Air." Other shots are reminiscent of the 87th Precinct police procedural writings of Ed McBain and still others the hard boiled violence of Mikey Spillane's Mike Hammer.
 
The film, for New Yorkers of a certain age, me for instance, shows a snapshot of the New York that existed just before I was born. Growing up in the city, quite a few of the sequences jog distant early childhood memories, imprints, that's the way it was, others verify the stories my mother and her sisters would tell. Curiously certain things survived beyond the film others didn't. For instance, the Third Ave. el and some swaths of  Lower East Side neighborhoods it served, that show in the chase climax of the film, were completely wiped off the face of the earth in 1950 to be replaced by urban renewal projects like the high rise Governor Alfred E. Smith Houses.
 

Another Academy Award went to Paul Weatherwax for film editing. The music was by Miklós Rózsa and Frank Skinner.

The film stars Barry Fitzgerald (Union Station (1950)) as Detective Lt. Dan Muldoon, Howard Duff  (Brute Force (1947), Johnny Stool Pigeon (1949), Private Hell 36 (1954), and ensemble Noir While the City Sleeps (1956)) as Frank Niles, Noir second tomato Dorothy Hart (Larceny(1948), Undertow (1949)) as Ruth Morrison, Don Taylor as Detective Jimmy Halloran, Frank Conroy as Captain Donahue, Ted de Corsia (no less than six other classic noir as Willie Garzah, House Jameson as Dr. Lawrence Stoneman, Anne Sargent as Mrs. Halloran, Adelaide Klein as Mrs. Paula Batory, Grover Burgess as Mr. Batory, Tom Pedi as Detective Perelli, Enid Markey as Mrs. Edgar Hylton, Walter Burke as Pete Backalis, Virginia Mullen as Martha Swenson, along with many uncredited parts with actors of note among them Paul Ford, James Gregory, John Marley, David Opatoshu, Kathleen Freeman and Arthur O'Connell.

As the cops get closer and closer to capturing the murder Grazah, the cinematography stylistically gives the impression that it is not only the investigators, but the city itself, it's grids and diagonals, the physical parts of its various superstructures, like nets of steel, brick, and concrete, are begining to slowly enclose around him.

Watched the Criterion DVD, 9/10. Fuller review with some screencaps here in Film Noir/Gangster pages, and with full review and more screencaps in Noirsville

PS - The only comparable film that I've seen that does a snapshot in time for L.A. similar to the way The Naked City does for New York is the Experimental Noir The Savage Eye (1960) 

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21 hours ago, laffite said:

[in response to my saying Netflix by Mail was TOO MUCH POWER FOR ME TO HANDLE]

Meaning ... ?

Netflix streaming like any streaming is convenient but in comparison to DVD mail service, the inventory is threadbare. But the mail doesn't have everything, but quite a lot.

I don't get a lot of joy out of life, but what little crumbs I get of it here and there come in good part from my love of pre-2000 cinema, and largely films from the golden era of HOLLYWOOD. I also have issues with motivation and tackling important tasks- and at the time, i had my own business- so it was risky to have access to such a time-killer at hand (ie a video game addiction, which thankfully i've never had)

i also have a SICK TWISTED HABIT of watching SICK, TWISTED, **** and NETFLIX BY MAIL was home to all this (at the time at least) PSYCHOTRONIC STUFF.

If it was on DVD, it was avail thru the mail via NETFLIX.

**I also note that the ANOTHER GREAT THING about discs in the mail were the DVD EXTRAS you could enjoy, featurettes and storyboards and the like, that you cannot get via streaming. they also would break up box sets for you.

**This was also waaaaay back  before i discovered YOUTUBE and also waaaay  back when TCM's scheduling was terrible- every month was GASLIGHT and ICE STATION ZEBRA. (not like now, ha ha)

so, to look at their catalogue and see that at any time I WANTED, I could get MY HANDS ON: All the 1930's horror movies, and Paramount's classic titles, AND FOX FILM NOIRS! and ALL the WB Melodramas, and all the Mexican Vampire movies, and every episode of the the 90's revival of DARK SHADOWS and EVERY TITLE IN THE CRITERION COLLECTION AND HANGOVER SQUARE AND FLAMINGO ROAD AND THE SCARLET EMPRESS AND ALUCARDA AND CALIGULA AND CANNIBAL HOLOCAUST AND...

 

tumblr_oz8kl9PZtR1r9fvmzo1_500.gif

Whew.

See, I just couldn't handle it.

IT WAS TOO MUCH POWER, i had to let it lapse.

But it's a GREAT SERVICE

 

 

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I've found that the library is a great source for watching classics as well.  Well, I guess provided you live in a big enough library system where they'd have a decent selection.  Since I live on the west side of the Portland Metro Area, my library system is I think about 20 libraries, half of which are in towns of 100,000+ people), but almost any movie I want is available in some capacity.  

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36 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I've found that the library is a great source for watching classics as well.  Well, I guess provided you live in a big enough library system where they'd have a decent selection.  Since I live on the west side of the Portland Metro Area, my library system is I think about 20 libraries, half of which are in towns of 100,000+ people), but almost any movie I want is available in some capacity.  

I bet you can't get CALIGULA at the library.

The Northwest is progressive, but it's not that progressive!

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4 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I bet you can't get CALIGULA at the library.

The Northwest is progressive, but it's not that progressive!

If it's the version that was released in 1979, there are three copies available within the library system.

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16 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

DAMN YOUR SOCIALIST UTOPIA!

(I live in NC, my library suuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuucks)

so jealous it burns

I bet it isnt the uncensored version........

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I never saw CALIGULA but from it's reputation I heard it makes A CLOCKWORK ORANGE look like THE SOUND OF MUSIC.

Though I have watched programs about Caligula on the History Channel. To say he was not a pleasant fellow would be a gross understatement.

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19 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I bet it isnt the uncensored version [of CALIGULA] ........

That might not be a bad thing. One of the weaknesses of the film is that the hard-core sex scenes are so obviously and carelessly spliced throughout. Like a scene of dialogue will all of a sudden be interrupted by a scene of *you know what* and then right back to the dialogue. 

Its lazy, but it gets to be kind of funny...And the movie could use some humor.

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20 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I bet it isnt the uncensored version........

I think the library might have both.  There is x1 copy of the "unrated" version and x2 copies of the "imperial" edition.

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31 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I never saw CALIGULA but from it's reputation I heard it makes A CLOCKWORK ORANGE look like THE SOUND OF MUSIC.

Though I have watched programs about Caligula on the History Channel. To say he was not a pleasant fellow would be a gross understatement.

Except that A Clockwork Orange is a good, well made film, and Caligula is neither good nor well made. Caligula is trainwreck cinema. You watch it to gawk at it.

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I also have a SICK TWISTED HABIT of watching SICK, TWISTED, **** and NETFLIX BY MAIL was home to all this (at the time at least) PSYCHOTRONIC STUFF.

Absolutely nothing wrong with that. I watch the same stuff. In fact, I think I made my way through the majority of such titles available on Netflix on disc back in the day. 

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7 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

so, to look at their catalogue and see that at any time I WANTED, I could get MY HANDS ON: All the 1930's horror movies, and Paramount's classic titles, AND FOX FILM NOIRS! and ALL the WB Melodramas, and all the Mexican Vampire movies, and every episode of the the 90's revival of DARK SHADOWS and EVERY TITLE IN THE CRITERION COLLECTION AND HANGOVER SQUARE AND FLAMINGO ROAD AND THE SCARLET EMPRESS AND ALUCARDA AND CALIGULA AND CANNIBAL HOLOCAUST AND...

 

tumblr_oz8kl9PZtR1r9fvmzo1_500.gif

Whew.

See, I just couldn't handle it.

Ehh, Peter Jackson ruined the Galadriel scene--

In Ralph Bakshi's animated '78 version, she's clearly making rueful fun at herself for ever thinking she could be tempted...Who could think she was being serious?:

Nowadays, though, I have to search the public-domain backwaters of Amazon Prime to find all my undiscovered Psychotronia.  Streaming-Netflix has turned too Big to be goofy and obscure.

(And when the heck did disk-Netflix ever have Criterion titles??)

5 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Except that A Clockwork Orange is a good, well made film, and Caligula is neither good nor well made. Caligula is trainwreck cinema. You watch it to gawk at it.

Caligula is basically two movies that were prevented from meeting--Malcolm McDowell and an all-star cast in an R-rated big-budget Roman epic, who weren't told about Bob Guccione's X-rated Penthouse sex scenes being filmed separately.

As they say, never let the left hand know what the....er.....um.....right hand is doing.  :blink:

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2 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I think the library might have both.  There is x1 copy of the "unrated" version and x2 copies of the "imperial" edition.

IMPERIAL??? LMREO!

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

That might not be a bad thing. One of the weaknesses of the film is that the hard-core sex scenes are so obviously and carelessly spliced throughout. Like a scene of dialogue will all of a sudden be interrupted by a scene of *you know what* and then right back to the dialogue. 

Its lazy, but it gets to be kind of funny...And the movie could use some humor.

LOL. I've never seen it......Have you seen Salo? I've never seen that one either.......

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Vigil in the Night (1940) - Solemn medical drama from RKO and director George Stevens. Carole Lombard stars as Anne Lee, a young British nurse and older sister to fellow novice nurse Lucy (Anne Shirley). An unfortunate accident leads to Anne leaving her hometown and moving to Manchester, where she enters the competitive nursing program at a prestigious hospital. Lead surgeon Dr. Prescott (Brian Aherne) sees some potential in Anne, but when Lucy arrives in town, Anne's newfound success may be put in jeopardy. Also featuring Peter Cushing, Robert Coote, Julien Mitchell, Brenda Forbes, Rita Page, and Ethel Griffies.

Lombard leaves her comedy persona far behind in a role where she rarely if ever cracks a smile. The setting is somber, the mood often depressed, and things only turn darker toward the end. I still liked it, as every film doesn't need to be sunshine and rainbows, and the performances, while muted, are good. I was especially impressed by Shirley as the screw-up younger sister, and Peter Cushing, in his largest role to date, as a weakling suitor to both sisters.  (7/10)

Source: TCM.

vigil-in-the-night-movie-poster-1940-101

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When the Daltons Rode (1940) - Highly fictionalized western from Universal Pictures and director George Marshall. East coast lawyer Tod Jackson (Randolph Scott) travels to Kansas where he meets the Dalton brothers: Grat (Brian Donlevy), Bob (Broderick Crawford), Ben (Stuart Erwin), and Emmett (Frank Albertson). They're farmers, with Bob a local law man, but when a crooked land company tries to steal their property, the brothers end up fugitives from the law. They soon embark on a spree of bank and train robberies that mark them as the most wanted men in the region. Meanwhile, Tod makes time with Bob's girlfriend Julie (Kay Francis). Also featuring Andy Devine, George Bancroft, Mary Gordon, Harvey Stephens, and Edgar Buchanan.

The cast is good, but the goofy script is almost 100% pure baloney, and production lurches from nicely competent to threadbare and cheap. One primary problem is that ostensible protagonist Scott is pointless to most of the story. I kept waiting for him to be reluctantly forced to go after his old friends, but that never happens. His character could have been removed from the whole thing with little change to the overall tale. I expected Donlevy to take the lead among the Daltons, but instead it's Crawford who gets the leadership role. Andy Devine plays the comic relief, naturally, but his character is also an inveterate skirt-chaser with a succession of women on his knee, not exactly what one expects from Devine. 

Two odds points from the film: there's a scene where the gang robs a train, and they steal the horses belonging to lawmen on the train. The horses are on an open-top corral train car, and they actually ride them off of the side of the moving train. It looked like an extremely dangerous stunt for the horses, but it's shown with no cuts, and none of the horses seemed injured, despite some spills. There's also a big shoot-out in the movie with the gang members inside a saloon with their opponents outside in the street and on opposite buildings. There is a lengthy exchange of gunfire through the saloon's large picture window, and the window never breaks, instead the bullets passing through and leaving bullet holes. Once or twice I can believe it, but a succession of rifle and pistol shots through a large sheet of glass and no shattering? That's some strong glass!  (6/10)

Source: Universal DVD.

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13 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Our grown kids think that DVDs are in the past, because of movies on the computer.

That's because your grown kids aren't "active seniors". Wait until THEY fall asleep & miss the endings of movies! A DVD is a heck of a lot easier to re-queue to the last 15 minutes of a movie to re-watch than anything streamed!

Plus, us old timers like our super BIG screen-I won't watch movies on my 18" computer monitor-ew.

As an "old" millennial (old in terms of the wide year span of this generation, I'm close to the beginning, just barely not Gen X), I can say that I prefer watching movies on the TV and not on my computer.  One, the sound is better and further away.  I can only look at the screen for so long before my eyes start hurting and I have to put my reading glasses on, lol.  

I fell asleep and missed the middle of Crossfire yesterday, I'll have to re-watch it.  Lately, I've been having to watch a movie in two parts--the beginning one day and the ending the next.  ::sigh:: On weekends, if I've slept in and haven't had too much wine or Cuba Libres, I can maybe make it through one film and part of a second before falling asleep.  Now movie theaters are being outfitted with those recliner seats and sometimes those are a killer when it comes to trying to stay awake.  I missed a little bit of Black Panther last night because I drifted off. 

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Darkest Hour (2017) - Snapshot biopic from Focus Features and director Joe Wright. The film follows a few weeks in the life of Winston Churchill (Gary Oldman), from his appointment as Prime Minister in May of 1940 through the evacuation of Dunkirk in June. During that time he struggles to rally the government into a war footing, as former PM Neville Chamberlain (Ronald Pickup) and his ally Viscount Halifax (Stephen Dillane), who have the favor of King George VI (Ben Mendelsohn), continue try for peace with Hitler's Germany. Also featuring Lily James, Kristen Scott Thomas, Nicholas Jones, Samuel West, David Schofield, Richard Lumsden, David Bamber, and Malcolm Storry.

Joe Wright is an inconsistent director. I enjoyed Atonement and Pride & Prejudice, but his Pan is one of the worst big-budget films I've ever seen. Thankfully this film ranks closer to the first two than the last. He still has a habit of adding ostentatious directorial flourishes in places where they are not needed, with lighting and camera tricks used to distracting effect. But the main draw here is the performance of Oldman. I have to admit that Gary Oldman is one of my favorite actors of his generation, and I tend to like any performance he gives, even the most over-the-top unrestrained ones. He's good here, but just shy of great. The makeup is unbelievably seamless, and deserves an Oscar. But the voice isn't quite right, and I still see Gary peeking through the outfits and the mannerisms. I won't be upset when he wins Best Actor this coming Sunday (he almost surely will, too: his is perhaps the most foregone conclusion of the night). As I said, I'm a big fan of his, and would like to see him win an Oscar finally. Unfortunately, it won't be for his best performance. I've seen two of the other nominees (Denzel Washington and Daniel Kaluuya), but not Timothee Chalamet in Call Me By Your Name or Daniel Day Lewis in Phantom Thread, so I can't say if either of those deserve it more.

As for the film itself (it's also up for Best Picture), like Oldman's performance, it's good but not great. It concentrates on such a small part of the man's life that it doesn't serve as a standard biopic, nor an overview of his participation in WW2 as a whole, only his first steps, which some have argued were the most important. Since his strength resides in his speeches, there are a lot of those, and some viewers may grow weary by film's end. The use of Lily James as an audience surrogate is also underdone. She plays a new private secretary to Churchill, and the film seems at first to want to follow her story as much as Churchill's, but that's left by the wayside by the movie's midway point. The performances from the excellent supporting cast of reliable character actors are good.   (7/10)

Source: Universal Blu-ray.

Ensemble_Quad_AW_33146_Darkest_Hour.jpg

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