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37 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I see that your list of Taylor films seen is missing Waterloo Bridge (1940). This is a beautifully mounted MGM soaper, with a luminous performance by Vivien Leigh and a pretty good one from Taylor. Taylor, by the way, called Waterloo Bridge the favourite film of his career.

Yeah, I know that one shows up a lot, but I've never gotten around to watching it. I've seen the earlier version from 1931 starring Mae Clarke, and I liked that one a lot.

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Exclusive! (1937) 7/10

Stars Fred MacMurray as assistant editor of a newspaper, Charles Ruggles as an older reporter on the same paper, and Frances Farmer as the former's fiancee and the latter's daughter.  Lloyd Nolan stars as his typical gangster persona. The paper MacMurray works for is printing articles to expose Nolan and his rackets and help elect a reform candidate, played by Ralph Morgan.  But Nolan has a novel angle. He buys a competing paper and hires reporters at top dollar to try and put the crusading paper out of business. Any likability or sympathy Farmer's character has - she is fired from her job in the middle of the Great Depression because she won't put out for the boss - is lost when she calls her dear old dad an "old licked failure" professionally. Plus she decides to go to work for Nolan's paper, partly because she wants to repay a debt somebody else took on for her, partly because MacMurray forbids her to do so and she does not want to be pushed around. The two break up over it.  In spite of Nolan warning his hoods to "cool it around the broad, she's not stupid, she'll put two and two together", Farmer plays a girl that really is not that world-wise and does not put two and two together until much later.

It's really a fast moving film about yellow journalism versus decent reporting, and about how every little dirty secret about somebody does not need to be revealed in print. MacMurray is good in these fast talking roles in his younger days. If it's Paramount and Charles Ruggles is around, you are going to have to put up with some of his drunk act, but I don't think they overdo it here. I'd recommend it if you ever find a copy. The last time I saw it on TV was on the old AMC.

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Hoganman1 said My wife and I watched The Stranger on the Third Floor on Sunday. We both really enjoyed it. I've been a fan of Noir for years and I'm bringing my wife on board. I cannot believe I hadn't seen or even heard of this film before now.

Welcome to the boards!
This thread is great for uncovering hidden gems and knowing what to steer clear of & why. These are some hardcore viewers who tell-it-like-it-is, which is great. I can't tell you how many oddball films I've found at my library & enjoyed after it was mentioned here.

I also like the thread about what's coming up each month and often find good recommendations to plan serious viewing or recording.

Nothing's worse than reading the thread about the fantastic movie that was broadcast yesterday!

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Who Killed Santa Claus? (1941) - French drama from Continental Films and director Christian-Jaque. It's Christmastime in a small village in the French Alps. The festive season gets disrupted when the local vicar is attacked and a valuable jeweled ring goes missing. The townsfolk start to turn on each other as everyone is a suspect, and things go from bad to worse when some children find a man dressed as Santa Claus murdered in the snow. Featuring Harry Baur, Renee Faure, Raymond Rouleau, Fernand Ledoux, Jean Brochard, Helena Manson, Marie-Helene Daste, and Bernard Blier.

This was the first film released by Continental Films, the movie company set up by the occupying German forces. Its bucolic setting and seemingly straightforward story helped it pass the strict censors, but there is some subtext if one cares to see it, involving paranoia and distrust among neighbors, and the dangers of hysteria. The film is often funny and lighthearted despite the subject matter. The cast is good, especially Baur as a globe maker (?!?) who all the town's children love, and Renee Faure as his daughter, who is more than little off in the head.   (7/10)

Source: FilmStruck.

MV5BYzY2NGM5YjQtNGQ0MC00NDM1LWJjNDQtYzU4

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1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

Hoganman1 said My wife and I watched The Stranger on the Third Floor on Sunday. We both really enjoyed it. I've been a fan of Noir for years and I'm bringing my wife on board. I cannot believe I hadn't seen or even heard of this film before now.

Welcome to the boards!
This thread is great for uncovering hidden gems and knowing what to steer clear of & why. These are some hardcore viewers who tell-it-like-it-is, which is great. I can't tell you how many oddball films I've found at my library & enjoyed after it was mentioned here.

I also like the thread about what's coming up each month and often find good recommendations to plan serious viewing or recording.

Nothing's worse than reading the thread about the fantastic movie that was broadcast yesterday!

I would say that personally, nobody's opinion either favorable or not has ever "steered" me towards or away from any movie.  Preferring instead to do my OWN thinking, I'll give any movie I haven't seen a try if it's scheduled time and length allows, and if in someone's given opinion, a summary of what the movie is about makes it sound interesting to me. 

I've stated in these boards before that the only reason I ever read movie critics' reviews in the paper is to get an idea of what the movie is about and to see if it sounds like something that would interest me.  Their opinion of it never sways me one way or the other.  I've found, over the years, that many movies that I wound up LOVING were ones that the critic panned and felt was a waste of his time.  AND many movies I HATED were ones the critic "gushed" over as "fantastic" or "marvelous".  

Sepiatone

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A Yank in the R.A.F. (1941) - Wartime aerial action and romance from 20th Century-Fox and director Henry King. Brash American pilot Tim Baker (Tyrone Power) heads to England to join the Royal Air Force. He runs into old flame Carol Brown (Betty Grable) who's working as a nightclub performer and as a member of the Women's Auxiliary Force. Tim finds competition for Carol's affections in both fellow pilot Pilby (Reginald Gardiner) and Wing Commander Morley (John Sutton). Also featuring Donald Stuart, Ralph Bird, Richard Fraser, Denis Green, Bruce Lester, and Ethel Griffies.

The mix of grim wartime reality and light-comedy romance is uneven, and for much of the film London under the blitz looks like a swell time for wining and dining your favorite gal while catching a show. Part of that is Grable's fault, as although she was looking to branch out into more dramatic parts, she was unsure of herself enough to insist on adding musical numbers to showcase her singing and dancing, thus her character became a part time showgirl. She's likable, and certainly attractive, and this was the movie that was said to have made her the pin-up queen of the war. The aerial footage is also a mixed bagged of actual film of British fighters and bombers in the air mixed with miniature model work and double-exposure FX. They may have earned the film an Oscar nomination for Best Special Effects, but they've aged poorly. The movie also features a depiction of the evacuation at Dunkirk, which is interesting to see, and to juxtapose with the 2017 film on the same subject. Gladys Cooper, whose name appears on the poster, was cut from the final film completely.   (6/10)

Source: Fox DVD.

1716403_500x800x250.jpg

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The Brothers and Sisters of the Toda Family (1941) - Japanese domestic drama from Shochiku and director Yasujiro Ozu. When the patriarch of a wealthy and respected family dies suddenly, his children are shocked to learn that he was secretly deeply in debt. They are forced to sell off his property and belongings to pay off this debt, which unfortunately leaves their mother (Ayako Katsuragi) and youngest, unmarried sister Setsuko (Mieko Takamine) without a place to live. The various brothers and sisters take them in, but personality clashes and selfish behavior finds the two women shuffled from one place to the next. Also featuring Shin Saburi, Hideo Fujino, Mitsuko Yoshikawa, Masao Hayama, Tatsuo Saito, Choko Iida, and Chishu Ryu.

Ozu's strict, regimented filming technique is in full effect here, with cameras set low and at a distance, rarely moving within a scene, and very little music used to score. The performances are all low key, and much of the dialogue is seemingly banal banter. But there is a lot of roiling emotion suppressed in these characters, and it boils up on occasion to moving effect, although never in a loud or hysterical way, as in a more westernized movie. Shin Saburi is a stand-out as the black sheep brother who lives far away but brings harsh truths to the forefront during his infrequent visits. One aspect of the story that is sad in hindsight is when a character rhapsodizes about what a prosperous future they will have working in China, as this was made during the Japanese occupation. That didn't work out so well for the Japanese, or the Chinese for that matter. Recommended.  (8/10)

Source: FilmStruck. The print is watchable, but there is substantial damage at times, and the soundtrack quality varies, all of which may be why Criterion has never put this one out on disc (although it is out on a Region 2 DVD). 

z12C1fm55zSaJe4ZapzhrwxcNgS.jpg

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21 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

My wife and I watched The Stranger on the Third Floor on Sunday. Many (including Eddie Muller) considered this the first Film Noir. We both really enjoyed it. I've been a fan of Noir for years and I'm bringing my wife on board. I cannot believe I hadn't seen or even heard of this film before now. While I don't consider it to be on the level of The Maltese Falcon or Double Indemnity, it does have all of the characteristics we've come to expect from this genre. I'm looking forward to seeing more hidden treasures on Noir Alley in the coming days. 

Has a Val Lewton directorial feel to it, I thought.

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Adventures of Captain Marvel (1941) - 12-chapter serial from Republic Pictures and directors William Witney & John English. An American archaeological expedition in a remote region discovers a long-hidden temple that contains an ancient weapon of incredible power, a scorpion shaped statue that can fire a deadly laser beam. Not long after arriving back in the U.S., a mysterious masked figure calling himself the Scorpion sends his minions out to claim the weapon. However, while at that temple, one of the expedition members, a young man named Billy Batson (Frank Coghlan Jr.) encounters a wizard who imbues Batson with the powers of Captain Marvel (Tom Tyler). Billy has only to say the name "SHAZAM!" and he's transformed into the larger, older, costumed hero with powers of flight, super strength, and nearly invulnerability. Also featuring William Benedict, Louise Currie, Robert Strange, Harry Worth, Bryant Washburn, John Davidson, George Pembroke, Tetsu Komai, and Reed Hadley.

This marks the first comic book superhero movie, and it came after Republic spent quite a bit of time and money trying to get a Superman movie made, only to have that character's rights owners refuse it. So instead, Republic went with the similar Captain Marvel, turning out one of the best serials of the era. It's corny, very silly, and often unintentionally amusing. It's also well-made, with groundbreaking effects and stunt work. Tyler makes a great looking superhero, although the more he keeps his mouth shut, the better. Coghlan's voice, as the young Batson, is high and wheedling and often funny. Watching Captain Marvel toss the bad guys around like dummies (which they obviously are) is a highlight, as is when he unintentionally causes more than one of them to die. Tyler sometimes looks like he enjoys punching a little too much. The character of Captain Marvel/Shazam was at one time a bigger seller than Superman, although he's become fairly obscure to modern audiences. That may change soon, as a new, big-budget Shazam movie is currently filming for a release next year.   (7/10)

Source: DVD (there are no company indicators anywhere on the sleeve or discs)

Adventures-of-Captain-Marvel-(1941)-pict

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5 hours ago, hamradio said:

"The Justice League" (2017),  the plots are getting ridiculous. Is this a superhero or "Clash of The Titans" movie? :wacko:

Yes, Warner/DC makes you appreciate how much Disney/Marvel is trying to court the audience who doesn't read comics, and needs someone patient and willing enough to explain who Black Panther is to them--

Warner, OTOH, thought they could leap into the loving arms of print-comic fanboys, who demand utter print-comic faithfulness in transcribing the Big Epic Storylines, and let the rest of the outside world confuse themselves and go hang.  (And then still go into big rages that Zack Snyder ruined it anyway.)

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Adventures of Captain Marvel (1941) 

Tyler sometimes looks like he enjoys punching a little too much.

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It's when a guy looks like he enjoys getting punched a little too much that you really have to worry.

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The Black Watch (1929) - Silly, creaky war film from Fox and director John Ford. Victor McLaglen stars as Captain Donald King, a member of a Scots regiment of His Majesty's Armed Forces during WW1. While his company receives orders to ship out to the front, King is given a different assignment, He is to go undercover to India, where he will pretend to be a drunk who gets chased out of the service so that he can infiltrate a gang of Muslim rebels who worship a woman named Yasmani (Myrna Loy) as a goddess. Naturally things get further complicated when King falls for Yasmani. Also featuring David Torrence, Lumsden Hare, David Rollins, Cyril Chadwick, Claud King, Roy D'Arcy, Mitchell Lewis, Walter Long, Francis Ford, and Randolph Scott & John Wayne as extras.

This was director Ford's first sound movie, and it shows. For the first 45 minutes or so, I was prepared to call this one a complete turkey, just horrible in nearly every way, but by the end I thought...pretty much the same thing, except it plunged into pure camp, and Ford manages to shoot some visually interesting shots when the action moves to "The Cave of the Echoes". McLaglen and Loy are awful, and you would never know from this that either would be capable of acting their way out of a paper bag. Ford certainly hadn't grasped sound acting, and virtually everyone is terrible, drawing lines out to ludicrous length and over emoting like the worst silent film ham. Loy looks great, and she has a lengthy scene in a white, virtually see-through shirt. I was left wondering what kind of East Indian Muslims also worshiped random white ladies as goddesses, but that train of thought led nowhere. The fiery, shadowy Cave interiors are atmospheric, and the scene where McLaglen is "forced" to wrestle the Muslim champion is amusing, as I would think it was harder to stop Victor McLaglen from wrestling random guys on the set every day.  (5/10, or 7/10 on a so-bad-its-good scale)

image+t.png

 

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4 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Adventures of Captain Marvel (1941) - 12-chapter serial from Republic Pictures and directors William Witney & John English. An American archaeological expedition in a remote region discovers a long-hidden temple that contains an ancient weapon of incredible power, a scorpion shaped statue that can fire a deadly laser beam. Not long after arriving back in the U.S., a mysterious masked figure calling himself the Scorpion sends his minions out to claim the weapon. However, while at that temple, one of the expedition members, a young man named Billy Batson (Frank Coghlan Jr.) encounters a wizard who imbues Batson with the powers of Captain Marvel (Tom Tyler). Billy has only to say the name "SHAZAM!" and he's transformed into the larger, older, costumed hero with powers of flight, super strength, and nearly invulnerability. Also featuring William Benedict, Louise Currie, Robert Strange, Harry Worth, Bryant Washburn, John Davidson, George Pembroke, Tetsu Komai, and Reed Hadley.

This marks the first comic book superhero movie, and it came after Republic spent quite a bit of time and money trying to get a Superman movie made, only to have that character's rights owners refuse it. So instead, Republic went with the similar Captain Marvel, turning out one of the best serials of the era. It's corny, very silly, and often unintentionally amusing. It's also well-made, with groundbreaking effects and stunt work. Tyler makes a great looking superhero, although the more he keeps his mouth shut, the better. Coghlan's voice, as the young Batson, is high and wheedling and often funny. Watching Captain Marvel toss the bad guys around like dummies (which they obviously are) is a highlight, as is when he unintentionally causes more than one of them to die. Tyler sometimes looks like he enjoys punching a little too much. The character of Captain Marvel/Shazam was at one time a bigger seller than Superman, although he's become fairly obscure to modern audiences. That may change soon, as a new, big-budget Shazam movie is currently filming for a release next year.   (7/10)

Source: DVD (there are no company indicators anywhere on the sleeve or discs)

Adventures-of-Captain-Marvel-(1941)-pict

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Captain Marvel is getting a sex change.

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3 minutes ago, hamradio said:

Captain Marvel is getting a sex change.

That's a different Captain Marvel. Marvel Comic's Captain Marvel is not to be confused with Fawcett/DC Comics Captain Marvel.

Marvel's Captain Marvel

captain-marvel-danvers_0.jpg

Fawcett/DC's Captain Marvel/Shazam

shazam-captainmarvel-by-alex-ross.jpg?w=

Because of that Marvel movie, the DC movie will not use the Captain Marvel name, and instead simply use Shazam.

A behind-the-scenes set pic of Zachary Levi in costume as Shazam was released recently. It looks very silly.

zachary-levi-e-flagrado-com-uniforme-de-

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11 minutes ago, hamradio said:

 

OMG "Clash of the Titans" are part of it!:huh::o

Shouldn't this new film be called "Shazam vs Superman".

 

Just to be clear, you do know that's not a real trailer, right? It's something some fan made for YouTube. There hasn't been any actual footage released for the Shazam movie as yet, and Dwayne Johnson isn't appearing in it.

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The Wrong Arm of the Law (1963)  I have mixed feelings about Peter Sellers..I usually like the comedies in which he's part of a good ensemble, but really don't like The Pink Panther series.  This is the former..and probably the funniest of the bunch.  Sellers leads a double life--a cultured retailer of ladies' fashion, and the head of a local gang (with appropriate accents for each). A new gang of Aussie's enter the scene, dressed as policemen, which enables them to steal from the stealers, and Sellers is furious that someone is leaking info to these outsiders (we learn very early who that is...). He calls a gang meeting, in which they chat and watch 'instructional videoes' to become better crooks (their favorite is the film Rififi).  Other local gangs are hit, so there is a group gang meeting (these meetings are hilarious..all very proper, there's even a booklet outlining 'gang laws') in which they decide to actually tell the police that there are phoney cops about..enter Lionel Jefferies.  Jefferies is terrific as the bobby who's always passed over, and he sees his big chance to make a splash by joining forces with Sellers.  They do clash over gang-staffing (when Sellers wants to add a German to the gang, Jefferies bemoans the fact that it would look so much better if they used only 'local lads').  A big robbery is carefully worked out, and of course, nothing goes as planned..even the gang they're after has problems, but Sellers has an idea that he'll leave his gang buddies behind and keep all the cash in the heist for himself and his new partner-in-crime..does Jefferies want in on this?  A funny, satisfying ending ties it all up neatly.  Along with Sellers and Jeffries, Bernard Cribbins and Dennis Price are standout 'gang members'; the film is satirical, wacky, and just plain funny all the way through..a must for fans of Brit comedy.  source: Kodi    Related image

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Way Back Home (1931) - Horribly corny "simple folk" comedy/drama from RKO and director William Seiter. Old man preacher Seth Parker (Phillips Lord) and his wife (Effie Palmer) have trouble with their two wards: young Robbie (Frankie Darro) was left with them by his mother before she passed and made them swear to keep the boy safely away from his abusive father. Naturally, the brute (Stanley Fields) shows up and wants the kid back. Meanwhile, their other ward, Mary Lucy (Bette Davis), has been kicked out of her own home by her parents, her disapprove of her fraternizing with the low-born David (Frank Albertson). Also featuring Oscar Apfel, Sophia M. Lord, Bennett Kilpack, and Raymond Hunter.

Seth Parker was a popular radio show at the time, the creation of 29 year old Phillips Lord, who plays him in the movie under a big phony white beard and wig. It was considered dated and hackneyed even in 1931, with little appeal to younger listeners, so the screenwriters spiced it up a bit with the David/Albertson romance and some "high-speed" wagon chases at the end. That didn't save the movie for me, however, and I found it dull, tedious, and dumb, with bad performances and hoary dialogue that is nearly as dusty as the backroads of California that stand in for Maine. Davis isn't bad, and she's said to have liked the movie, since it allowed her to play an attractive girl at a time when the studios weren't giving her those kind of roles. Still, even she's not enough to save this dud.   (4/10)

Source: TCM.

0031cf91_medium.jpeg

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13 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Just to be clear, you do know that's not a real trailer, right? It's something some fan made for YouTube. There hasn't been any actual footage released for the Shazam movie as yet, and Dwayne Johnson isn't appearing in it.

Doesn't end, now movie trailers are FAKE! :angry:

I deleted my post.

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

That's a different Captain Marvel. Marvel Comic's Captain Marvel is not to be confused with Fawcett/DC Comics Captain Marvel.

Marvel's Captain Marvel

captain-marvel-danvers_0.jpg

Fawcett/DC's Captain Marvel/Shazam

shazam-captainmarvel-by-alex-ross.jpg?w=

Because of that Marvel movie, the DC movie will not use the Captain Marvel name, and instead simply use Shazam.

Actually, the maturated version of Mr. Batson has been "Shazam!" in the comics for a while now, because of said confusion long predating the movie.  (Since that was what most of us thought his name was from the 70's Saturday-morning series anyway.)

Marvel's Captain inherited her powers from alien captain Mar-Vell (get it?)

250px-Captain_Marvel_29.jpg

before becoming "Ms. Marvel" throughout the 80's and 90's.  Now she's Captain, and the "Ms." title has since passed down to a sweetly nerdy Arabic teenager in New Jersey:

portrait_incredible.jpg

1 hour ago, hamradio said:

Doesn't end, now movie trailers are FAKE! :angry:

I deleted my post.

Just the ones for long-delayed overhyped superhero or Star Wars movies that haven't shown a real trailer yet, like the Captain Marvel one--

I don't know exactly WHY fans do that, it's sort of the same reason studios announce release dates and title logos for movies before writing and directing them:  They psychologically feel as if if some piece of the movie actually existed yet, it would be spiritually the same as the movie actually existing yet...  :lol:

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Black Watch (1929) - Silly, creaky war film from Fox and director John Ford. Victor McLaglen stars as Captain Donald King, a member of a Scots regiment of His Majesty's Armed Forces during WW1. While his company receives orders to ship out to the front, King is given a different assignment, He is to go undercover to India, where he will pretend to be a drunk who gets chased out of the service so that he can infiltrate a gang of Muslim rebels who worship a woman named Yasmani (Myrna Loy) as a goddess. Naturally things get further complicated when King falls for Yasmani. Also featuring David Torrence, Lumsden Hare, David Rollins, Cyril Chadwick, Claud King, Roy D'Arcy, Mitchell Lewis, Walter Long, Francis Ford, and Randolph Scott & John Wayne as extras.

This was director Ford's first sound movie, and it shows. For the first 45 minutes or so, I was prepared to call this one a complete turkey, just horrible in nearly every way, but by the end I thought...pretty much the same thing, except it plunged into pure camp, and Ford manages to shoot some visually interesting shots when the action moves to "The Cave of the Echoes". McLaglen and Loy are awful, and you would never know from this that either would be capable of acting their way out of a paper bag. Ford certainly hadn't grasped sound acting, and virtually everyone is terrible, drawing lines out to ludicrous length and over emoting like the worst silent film ham. Loy looks great, and she has a lengthy scene in a white, virtually see-through shirt. I was left wondering what kind of East Indian Muslims also worshiped random white ladies as goddesses, but that train of thought led nowhere. The fiery, shadowy Cave interiors are atmospheric, and the scene where McLaglen is "forced" to wrestle the Muslim champion is amusing, as I would think it was harder to stop Victor McLaglen from wrestling random guys on the set every day.  (5/10, or 7/10 on a so-bad-its-good scale)

image+t.png

 

This is the movie that allegedly caused uncontrollable laughter everywhere it was shown because every time McLagen said Yasmani, he pronounced it "Jazz Minnie". I will have to leave it to you whether it actually sounds like he's saying that or if it's just one of those urban legends that has taken on a life of its own after 90 years, because I've never seen it. But if you ever read a John Ford bio, or anything about the foibles of the early sound era, that story ALWAYS pops up.

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20 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

This is the movie that allegedly caused uncontrollable laughter everywhere it was shown because every time McLagen said Yasmani, he pronounced it "Jazz Minnie". I will have to leave it to you whether it actually sounds like he's saying that or if it's just one of those urban legends that has taken on a life of its own after 90 years, because I've never seen it. But if you ever read a John Ford bio, or anything about the foibles of the early sound era, that story ALWAYS pops up.

He pronounced it more like "Yazz-MEEN-ay". It sounded odd enough that one of the first things I looked at when reading up on the movie after watching it was how her character name was spelled.

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1 hour ago, hamradio said:

Doesn't end, now movie trailers are FAKE! :angry:

I deleted my post.

Ah, you didn't have to do that. I just wanted to make sure you knew what you were looking at. It was cobbled together from clips of other movies, with some homemade computer effects to change the costumes. Some of those YouTubers have talent, and some of those amateur trailers are better crafted than the professional ones from the studios.

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All Through The Night (1942) Delightful watch. Those who find fault with mixing action-drama and comedy may be missing the point.  Zinger one-liners and rapid repartee (along with a little slapstick here and there) pepper this story of a Nazi spy ring aiming to perpetrate an operation that we would call terrorism today. And yet the movie insists on poking fun ... and with success. They have the right people to do it. What a surprise to see a young Phil Silvers and a young Jackie Gleason trading barbs in the opening while Humphrey Bogart waits for his cheesecake. Would be viewers are generally pretty aware of the top billers (Conrad Veidt, Peter Lorre, Bogie), but the cavalcade of recognizable others keep appearing, like Jane Darwell, Judith Anderson, Frank McHugh, William Demarest, Wallace Ford (as well as Jackie and Phil). And introducing (for me, anyway) one Kaaren Verne, who doesn't crack any jokes but who doesn't need to (and besides, she has enough on her mind). Love the meeting in the basement, I need to learn that language Bogie and friend used, it might get me out of a jam sometime. The fast pace and lickity-split dialogue kept my mind glued as well as a ready smile sustained. Enjoyed thoroughly.

***

out of 4

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