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Come to Dinner (1934).

Warner Bros. made this Broadway Brevity, a 22-minute parody of MGM's Dinner at Eight from late the previous year, using as much as possible actors who looked like the stars of the MGM version.  The stand-in for Wallace Beery is probably the weakest, but the stand-ins for John Barrymore and the actresses are a hoot, especially the Billie Burke impersonator.

There's a scene of the doctor visiting Jean Harlow's apartment, changed here to have 12 maids go into a musical number parodying stars like Mae Zest and Greta Gargle.  The best change to the plot involves the John Barrymore character.  Instead of being an alcoholic, washed-up actor, he's addicted to lemons(!) and wants to wind down his career playing bit parts.  His press agent is so exasperated by his refusal to take starring roles that it's the press agent who tries to gas himself!  (The Barrymore character stops him, pointing out that the hotel managers came up to him to comment not about an unpaid bill, but the high price of the gas he was using.)

If you like Dinner at Eight, you'll absolutely love this.  9/10

It's on the DVD release of Dinner at Eight that's part of the Harlow four-film set available at the TCM Shop and Amazon.

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Secret Ceremony (1968) - Embarrassingly awful psycho-drama from Universal Pictures and director Joseph Losey. Leonora (Elizabeth Taylor) has been walking about in a haze of grief ever since her 10 year-old daughter drowned five years ago. On the way to visit the child's grave, a strange young woman named Cenci (Mia Farrow) begins following Leonora, eventually explaining that Leonora looks like Cenci's recently deceased mother. Leonora sees a certain resemblance to the woman that her daughter might have grown up to look like in Cenci, and realizing that Cenci has more than a few screws loose, the older woman decides to move into Cenci's opulent home to look after her. The two spend time in a giant bed and a giant bath tub, but Cenci's bizarre behavior continues to get worse, a situation that is exacerbated by the arrival of Cenci's lascivious stepfather Albert (Robert Mitchum). Also featuring Peggy Ashcroft and Pamela Brown.

How a movie this bizarre, one that struggles so much to be outrageous and push the new freedoms in cinema, can still end up being so boring and dull, is a real testament to director Losey. For me, the movie starts out with two strikes against it thanks to Taylor and Farrow, two of my least favorite actresses. Taylor generally just bores me with her overwrought histrionics and eyebrows by Sharpie, but Farrow really irritates me, especially during the wide-eyed, fragile waif period of her career, which is in full effect here. I watched this for Mitchum, but even he's pretty terrible, with a shoddy accent that only accentuates the lurid absurdity of his "shocking" discussions of incest or measuring the sexual arousal of hamsters as they watch Jean Harlow movies (No, that's really part of the dialogue!). TCM timed the showing right, playing it as a TCM Underground entry, and I can see this having a fervent, if misguided, cult following thanks to the general silliness of it all. But for me it was just a boring slog of "Ooo, look how naughty we're being!" dialogue and ham-fisted psycho-babble encased in a poorly-acted waste of time.   (3/10)

Source: TCM.

a-Joseph-Losey-Secret-Ceremony-Elizabeth

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I also saw this recently and I thought more positively of it though. Yes, it's really disjointed and bizarre and all over the place but it is that exactly that reminded me of what I like in Lynch movies. It has a kitschy, bizarre charm to it in my opinion. I also have a higher opinion of Liz Taylor so that may be part of it. I've read that they edited this movie quite a bit so that could be an explanation for some of the plot holes.

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17 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

Yes, it's really disjointed and bizarre and all over the place but it is that exactly that reminded me of what I like in Lynch movies.

What Lynch are you talking about?  

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Just now, jamesjazzguitar said:

What Lynch are you talking about?  

David Lynch movies. The bizarre and unnerving atmosphere from the movie brought to mind David Lynch.

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3 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

David Lynch movies. The bizarre and unnerving atmosphere from the movie brought to mind David Lynch.

Maybe in bits of the content, but certainly not in the style, which is what differentiates a David Lynch movie for me. The camerawork and soundscapes he uses are an unnerving and essential part of his formula, while Joseph Losey showed no flair for either in Secret Ceremony

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The Maze (Allied Artists, 1953) - Stumbled across this at random on YouTube on a recent night when I couldn't sleep. It doesn't appear to have ever aired on TCM, though it would surely fit in on a night when they show sci-fi/horror stuff from the '50s, especially since it stars Richard "I'll Do Anything for a Paycheck" Carlson, whom TCM often features on their '50s sci-fi/monster movie nights.

This video was apparently recorded from a very long ago AMC airing when that network actually showed movies uncut and commercial free. Twenty years ago? More?

Carlson plays the heir to a Scottish castle and estate that he hasn't even seen since he was a child who's vacationing in Cannes with his fiancee (Veronica Hurst) and her aunt. All he knows about it from his childhood visits was that his uncle, the current estate owner, followed certain very specific rules such as locking all the doors at night, that all his ancestors also followed. There's no electricity or telephone on the estate. Also, there's a garden maze like the one in Sleuth into which no one is allowed. 

Word comes to Carlson that his uncle has died and that he must come to Scotland to settle the affairs of the estate. He leaves his fiancee and her aunt in Cannes telling them it should be no trouble at all for him to be back for the wedding in two weeks. Instead, something like three months go by before he finally sends a letter to Cannes saying the idea of his now getting married is quite impossible. He's scratched out one sentence that the two women nevertheless are able to decipher, hinting that only the death of some unnamed person could ever free him to marry.

These apparently fabulously wealthy women who have remained at their hotel in Cannes all these months now travel to the Highlands to find out what's what for themselves. Carson is extremely unhappy to seen them. He looks pale and haggard and haunted, as if he's aged ten years in those three months. Though he initially tries to not even let them in, he finally reluctantly agrees to let them stay a few nights. The fiancee and the aunt are locked up in their rooms at night, at which time they hear odd sounds of dragging feet in the halls. Also, there are weird webbed footprints all over the place when they're let out in the morning. But neither Carlson nor his two creepy servants will tell them anything. They, too, are forbidden from entering the maze.

The film reminded me a bit of some of those Vincent Price/Roger Corman films, in which they would try to stretch a nine-page Edgar Allen Poe story into a 90-minute film. There's a lot of wandering around the castle, but the plot advances at an absolutely glacial pace, as time needs to be filled. We finally get a creature reveal very late in the film, and there's a heavily verbose explanation in the final scene of what's been going on reminiscent of the rush of information suddenly provided by a psychiatrist about the psyche of Norman Bates that's been left unsaid for the rest of the movie.

I was unfamiliar with Veronica Hurst. I don't even know her place of origin. But she reminded me of Grace Kelly, not only because of being blonde, but because she speaks with a highly stilted, overly proper accent that seems to come from many years all-girl prep school tutelage that I've always found in Kelly's speech. I mean, such overly affected and self-conscious proper English that she hardly seems like an actual human being, something that also other bothered me about Kelly's acting.

If you like this sort of fare, it's not any better or worse then similar films of its style.

Oh, yeah, it was a 3-D film, which obviously you don't get to see in that format on YouTube. Like other 3-D films of its era, there are lots of shots that were meant to appear to be projecting something out into the audience. You can kind of imagine as you watch just where these scenes are.

Buy this poster at MovieGoods.com

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Always in My Heart (1942) - Saccharine musical drama from Warner Brothers and director Jo Graham. Mackenzie Scott (Walter Huston) has just been paroled from prison after serving many years for a crime he didn't commit. He learns that his ex-wife Marjorie (Kay Francis) has told their children that their father is dead, so Mackenzie continues the ruse, even while making contact with his musically gifted daughter Victoria (Gloria Warren). Also featuring Una O'Connor, Sidney Blackmer, Patti Hale, Frankie Thomas, Armida, Frank Puglia, Anthony Caruso, John Hamilton, Lon McCallister, and Borrah Minevitch & His Harmonica Rascals.

Huston's character is supposed to be a gifted composer who has written a new song named "Always in My Heart", and it gets performed in one form or another many times. It even earned an Oscar nomination for Best Song. Gloria Warren, who gets an "Introducing" credit, was Warner Brothers attempt at making a Deanna Durbin-style wholesome singing star. She appeared in another 4 or 5 movies and retired from the screen. She's not terrible, but she doesn't make much of an impression. Perhaps the most memorable aspect of this movie are the Harmonica Rascals, a group of oddball characters who all play harmonicas, naturally, and add comic relief.   (6/10)

Source: TCM.

27qzl5bnzqxyqzy5+(1).jpg

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The Snows of Kilimanjaro (1952) Based on (inspired by might be better) Ernest Hemingway' most famous short story. A man on safari (Gregory Peck) has a slight wound but it is festering with the threat of gangrene. While waiting for help (a plane is coming) he is tormented with things undone in the past, especially regarding the books he might have written, but didn't. He muses (deliriously at times) on death and occasionally sinks into self pity. He is assiduously cared for by his wife (Susan Hayward) as well as a team of native guides.

The movie consists of a number flashbacks. In the original story, a woman is briefly mentioned (she has no name in the book) who nevertheless represents his major love interest. The movie names her Cynthia Green (Ava Gardner) and gives her major screen time in providing the love story that the brass of course thought necessary. Ava carries the role efficiently.

Harry Street
(Peck) is a vastly successful writer already but he (in flashback) is compelled to wanderlust in order to find material for stories to write. Whether his current output is simply pulp and he therefore aspires to a more literary endeavor is not immediately clear in my mind at the moment but in any case he feels his output up to the present is missing something vital. One of his prior books might just well be a sign (a wink to the audience?) of his discontent in the form of a cross-lingual pun, the title being "The Road to Rouen." Street's angst is purged at least in part through the help of a mentor and good friend who he calls Uncle Bill, wonderfully played by Leo G Carroll. The latter has several short scenes with Street. and has an especially entertaining one with a woman (Hildegard Knef, who's pretty good in a small role), who becomes Street's fiance. Carroll is strong in this role. He speaks with a wry, bemused air and dominates all his scenes.. Worthy of a Best Supporting Nomination, I would think. (Maybe he got one for all I know.)

Gregory Peck is fine and successfully carries the role but at times he seems unconvincing. Spontaneous reactions are not always free. He's a bit stiff and his attempts at buoyancy seems forced. Susan Hayward is excellent in a relatively unspectacular role. But it is an important one as she has to carry the load in the waning moments. Her commitment to character was extraordinary. Another Best Supporting nominee if I may so opine.

The location settings are impressive though I am guessing that some of them (if not all) were not original to the actual film. Following Street's itinerary we see parts of Egypt and Africa, with a bit of French Riviera. The stunning bullfight footage from Madrid I happen to know was lifted from a prior movie. Theater goers at the time no doubt knew nothing of this, they were probably quite impressed.

And the film was shot in Glorious Technicolor. All things considered, the film must have been considered quite lavish for the time.

*** 1/2

out of four

 

 

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i feel kinda guilty and maybe i should keep this to myself, but i turned off MADIGAN (1968) about an hour and 20 minutes into it...

it wasn't bad, and it had some strengths (namely Widmark and James Whitmore, who I always like), but overall it seemed like an unfocused TV Pilot or movie-of-the-week- it had an all over the place feel to the story and some of the acting was on autopilot.

[i developed a theory watching this last night that Henry Fonda must have been SO PEEVED about not getting nominated for 12 ANGRY MEN or MISTER ROBERTS that he was all: "**** it, I'm still gonna be in movies, but I'll be damned if I'm going to act in any way while I'm there!"]

it was a film with lines like "MADIGAN PLAYS BY HIS OWN RULES BUT HE'S A GOOD COP!" and an intrusive music score supervised by Joseph Gershensessessenson that sounds like it should be playing during a promo for why you should invest in a timeshare in Florida.

it was also a movie that presented a rather clean and sunny NEW YORK- one that was none too congested and where characters ran into one another on the street by coincidence. i've been to New York, granted it was later than 1968, but basically- every spot in New York City is like the stateroom scene in A NIGHT AT THE OPERA, only DIRTY. HOLLYWOOD really didn't do NEW YORK films right until the mid seventies. 

there were quite a few scenes that i think were shot on the Universal backlot.

also the dubbing was bad.

Webster's mom was in this, wearing a turban in one scene.

i am aware this review was an unfocused mess in and of itself, but i think it fits the general tone of MADIGAN pretty well.

 

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Hangman (2017) - Cliched serial killer thriller from Lionsgate, Millennium, and Saban Films, and director Johnny Martin. Homicide detective Ruiney (Karl Urban) is ordered to escort writer Christi (Brittany Snow) through his latest case so that she can write a book on it. It just so happens that the next case to land on his desk turns out to be a victim of a serial killer nicknamed the Hangman, since he both leaves his victims hanging, and leaves a hangman word puzzle near each crime scene. To solve this case, Ruiney has to enlist the aid of his retired ex-partner Archer (Al Pacino) who may end up having a personal connection to the culprit. Also featuring Joe Anderson, Sarah Shahi, Chelle Ramos, and Steve Coulter.

This barely-released police thriller made some headlines last year when it received a 0% rating on Rotten Tomatoes. That score has gone up to 6% (out of 100), but the movie really isn't that awful. It's not good, either, but I've seen worse. The faults here lie mainly with the tired serial killer plot tropes, and some abysmal editing during the film's finale that makes things a little confused and laughable. Brittany Snow does a decent job as the reporter with literal scars from the past, while Karl Urban looks puffy and constipated. I watched this for Pacino, whose choice in films has been really awful for the past decade or more, with a few exceptions. This one seems like another check-casher, and he puts forth just enough effort to skate by.   (5/10)

Source: Lionsgate Blu-ray.

5761482.jpg

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22 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Secret Ceremony (1968) - Embarrassingly awful psycho-drama from Universal Pictures and director Joseph Losey. Leonora (Elizabeth Taylor) has been walking about in a haze of grief ever since her 10 year-old daughter drowned five years ago. On the way to visit the child's grave, a strange young woman named Cenci (Mia Farrow) begins following Leonora, eventually explaining that Leonora looks like Cenci's recently deceased mother. Leonora sees a certain resemblance to the woman that her daughter might have grown up to look like in Cenci, and realizing that Cenci has more than a few screws loose, the older woman decides to move into Cenci's opulent home to look after her. The two spend time in a giant bed and a giant bath tub, but Cenci's bizarre behavior continues to get worse, a situation that is exacerbated by the arrival of Cenci's lascivious stepfather Albert (Robert Mitchum). Also featuring Peggy Ashcroft and Pamela Brown.

How a movie this bizarre, one that struggles so much to be outrageous and push the new freedoms in cinema, can still end up being so boring and dull, is a real testament to director Losey. For me, the movie starts out with two strikes against it thanks to Taylor and Farrow, two of my least favorite actresses. Taylor generally just bores me with her overwrought histrionics and eyebrows by Sharpie, but Farrow really irritates me, especially during the wide-eyed, fragile waif period of her career, which is in full effect here. I watched this for Mitchum, but even he's pretty terrible, with a shoddy accent that only accentuates the lurid absurdity of his "shocking" discussions of incest or measuring the sexual arousal of hamsters as they watch Jean Harlow movies (No, that's really part of the dialogue!). TCM timed the showing right, playing it as a TCM Underground entry, and I can see this having a fervent, if misguided, cult following thanks to the general silliness of it all. But for me it was just a boring slog of "Ooo, look how naughty we're being!" dialogue and ham-fisted psycho-babble encased in a poorly-acted waste of time.   (3/10)

Source: TCM.

a-Joseph-Losey-Secret-Ceremony-Elizabeth

SC-4.jpg

Yes, bizarrely tedious about sums it up. I caught part of it the other night (had seen it before). Just awful. One of Farrow's worst performances. She looks so hideous too. UGH!

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6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

i feel kinda guilty and maybe i should keep this to myself, but i turned off MADIGAN (1968) about an hour and 20 minutes into it...

 

I stuck it out watching Madigan last night as well.

Can you be psychic about a movie that was made 50 years ago?  After watching I went to the Wikipedia page and your comment about being a TV pilot was on the money as in fact Madigan did result in a TV show of sorts. I won't spoil the movie ending by revealing the details, but they brought the Madigan character back as part of an NBC Wednesday Mystery Movie series.  (The Madigan episodes only lasted one season.)

Wikipedia also explained that some of the dubbing you noticed was due to some in-fighting between the producer of the film, Frank Rosenberg, and the director Don Siegel.  Rosenberg appears to be somewhat a horse's a** as he made them go back and correct some dialog to match what he thought it should be against the director's wishes.

There are some other interesting stories there about the making of the film if you want to check it out.

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The Sorcerers (1967)  Have you ever watched a film and thought 'that could've been a pretty good movie..'? Well, this begins with an interesting idea to build on, but it gets in it's own way and barely achieves average.  Boris Karloff stars as a hypnotist who's worked a lifetime to achieve mind control of others, only sharing his secrets with his wife Catherine Lacey.  I know you're thinking 'Karloff is up to his evil-science self again', but..he's not..well, not completely.  Karloff envisions a method by which he can 'connect' with the mind of a young person, send them on a wonderful journey, and every thought and sensation about that trip will be 'known' and experienced by the elderly or ill who can't go themselves..good premise, eh?  Enter Ian Ogilvy, an 'Alfie' type, who's just bored with the whole mod scene and looking for new kicks.  After being hooked up to wires in an odd little room full of phoney looking panels and lots of reel-to-reel recorders, Karloff and his Mrs. can, indeed, control his actions. Karloff is thrilled, but Lacey doesn't want to waste this chance..she's had it with years of poverty, so she 'controls' him into stealing a fur for her.  The elderly couple 'feel' the fear/excitement/danger as Ogilvy evades a guard.  This new 'rush' turns Lacey into a real thrill seeker, and she orders him to do increasingly dangerous, brutal things..including murder.  Karloff knows she's gone overboard, but can't stop her when she even turns on him in order to get her 'thrill fix' via the young man. A good idea, poorly executed..starting with the music.  There are those 'a ha!' soap opera-ish organ swells, mixed in with 'electric noise', really bad club band music, and lilting harpsichord..it's like everything was pulled out of a studio grab bag.  Karloff, of course, and Lacey are quite good, and Victor Henry (as Ogilvy's friend) is believable.  Aside from a very short scene with Susan George, the actresses are pretty bad..Elizabeth Ercy's talent is playing with her hair and Sally Sheridan stiffly plays a  singer, but can't remember to move her lips to the music. Photography is strange--in an argument sequence, it's continual one-shots..I doubt they were in the same room, and a car chase sequence is ruined by boring close-ups of different characters. What could've been quite a thriller ends up a sloppy mess.  source: terrarium             Related image

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1 hour ago, cmovieviewer said:

I stuck it out watching Madigan last night as well.

Can you be psychic about a movie that was made 50 years ago?  After watching I went to the Wikipedia page and your comment about being a TV pilot was on the money as in fact Madigan did result in a TV show of sorts. I won't spoil the movie ending by revealing the details, but they brought the Madigan character back as part of an NBC Wednesday Mystery Movie series.  (The Madigan episodes only lasted one season.)

yes, yes- FULL DISCLOSURE, I read the wiki page after seeing the movie AND BEFORE writing my review (and even went ahead and read the ending)

i guess i was kinda cheating when i wrote the "movie of the week" description- but it was so damned on the nose i couldn't not use it.

I DON'T ALWAYS PLAY BY THE RULES EITHER, DAMNIT, BUT I GET RESULTS!!!!

 

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

"Would you kindly get THE HELL off me, Mia? I DON'T WANT TO LOOK LIKE JANE BIRKIN!"

 

There's irony in your line, Lorna, thanks to Death on the Nile where, in the climax of the film, it is revealed that

Mia's character sliced open Jane Birkin's throat.

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1 minute ago, CinemaInternational said:

There's irony in your line, Lorna, thanks to Death on the Nile where, in the climax of the film, it is revealed that

  Hide contents

Mia's character sliced open Jane Birkin's throat.

 

LOL! I'd forgotten about that..........

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Carnival of Sinners aka La main du diable (1943) - French supernatural horror from Continental Films and director Maurice Tourneur. Pierre Fresnay stars as Roland Brissot, a struggling Parisian painter who agrees to buy a magic talisman from a chef. The chef swears that it will imbue the owner with great skill in their chosen profession, but at the cost of their immortal soul if they were to die with it in their possession. Therefore, Roland can buy it and use it to achieve wealth and fame, but he must find another to buy it before his death or risk damnation. The talisman itself is a man's severed hand kept in a small chest, and once Roland gets it, he sees that it works, but soon regrets his purchase. Also featuring Josseline Gael, Noel Roquevert, Guillaume de Sax, Pierre Larquey, and Palau as "Le petit homme."

This old-fashioned story is told with innovative filming techniques and a deft hand by director Tourneur. The highlight for me was a late-in-the-film sequence where all of the previous owners of the hand appear to Fresnay, with each telling his story while wearing gaudy carnival costumes.   (7/10)

Source: FilmStruck.

la-main-du-diable.jpg

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On 2/11/2018 at 6:33 PM, Fedya said:

10 Rillington Place (1971)

Based on a true story, Richard Attenborough plays John Christie, a serial killer who in the opening scene kills a woman in 1944 London.  Cut to five years later.  The Evanses (John Hurt and Judy Geeson) sublet a flat from Christie.  When Mrs. Evans gets pregnant, she tries to get an abortion from Christie, who uses the opportunity to kill her and put the blame on the illiterate, dim-witted Mr. Evans.

Christie and Hurt are both excellent in their roles, Hurt playing it by looking hollow-eyed throughout.  Location shooting makes this a thoroughly unromantic Notting Hill.

9/10

I DVR'ed it same time, just watched it Sunday, finally had time. Wow. I love Sir Richard and Sir John(still can't believe he's gone) Such an excellent film. I am still in amazement the performances in it. 10/10.

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Flight to Nowhere (1946) YouTube

This should be subtitled “The Plot to Nowhere.”

The film opens in Honolulu (I’m sure it was filmed on location) and some guy gets gunned down. Then we get stock footage of an atomic explosion. That’s pretty much all the excitement in the movie, and the opening credits haven’t even rolled yet.

Everybody is trying to find a map to a uranium mine. No one is who they seem to be. In other words, you think you are watching actors, but you’re not.

Alan Curtis walks around like Al Gore and reads his lines off a teleprompter. He gets cold-cocked twice and makes wisecracks about it. A way-over-the-hill Jack Holt is shoved into several scenes as a government man. Evelyn Ankers doesn’t even get a chance to scream. Silent film cowboy Hoot Gibson has a bit as a sheriff. Jerome Cowan is a bad guy. The climax lasts about 20 seconds.

You can fall asleep several times during the film (as I did) and not miss anything.

YxztOm1.png
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Return to Glennascaul (1953) - Supernatural short film from writer-director Hilton Edwards. Orson Welles plays himself, in Ireland and taking a break from filming Othello, who regales the audience with a ghost story involving a lone motorist at night who has a supernatural encounter. It's low budget, the story is well-worn even by 1953 standards, and the music and filming style, while ahead of their time, look like something from an early 70's TV movie, only in black & white. Think an Irish-flavored Dan Curtis lark. It was nominated for the Two Reel Short Subject Oscar. (6/10)

Source: TCM.

ReturntoGlen4.jpg

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20 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

i feel kinda guilty and maybe i should keep this to myself, but i turned off MADIGAN (1968) about an hour and 20 minutes into it...

it wasn't bad, and it had some strengths (namely Widmark and James Whitmore, who I always like), but overall it seemed like an unfocused TV Pilot or movie-of-the-week- it had an all over the place feel to the story and some of the acting was on autopilot.

[i developed a theory watching this last night that Henry Fonda must have been SO PEEVED about not getting nominated for 12 ANGRY MEN or MISTER ROBERTS that he was all: "**** it, I'm still gonna be in movies, but I'll be damned if I'm going to act in any way while I'm there!"]

it was a film with lines like "MADIGAN PLAYS BY HIS OWN RULES BUT HE'S A GOOD COP!" and an intrusive music score supervised by Joseph Gershensessessenson that sounds like it should be playing during a promo for why you should invest in a timeshare in Florida.

it was also a movie that presented a rather clean and sunny NEW YORK- one that was none too congested and where characters ran into one another on the street by coincidence. i've been to New York, granted it was later than 1968, but basically- every spot in New York City is like the stateroom scene in A NIGHT AT THE OPERA, only DIRTY. HOLLYWOOD really didn't do NEW YORK films right until the mid seventies. 

there were quite a few scenes that i think were shot on the Universal backlot.

also the dubbing was bad.

Webster's mom was in this, wearing a turban in one scene.

i am aware this review was an unfocused mess in and of itself, but i think it fits the general tone of MADIGAN pretty well.

 

Yes Madigan leaves me a native New Yorker pretty blah, I get the same vibe from The Detective with Sinatra.     
Kiss of Death (1947), The Unsuspected (1947),Naked City (1948), The Window (1949), Side Street (1950), The Killer That Stalked New York (1951), Killers Kiss (1955), Sweet Smell Of Success (1957), Odds Against Tomorrow (1959), Something Wild (1961), Blast Of Silence (1961), The Young Savages (1961), Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962), The Pawnbroker (1964), Who Killed Teddy Bear (1965), Mister Buddwing, from 1966 (even though it too has a few backlot brownstone shots), Aroused (1966), The Incident (1967), does NYC much better. 

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