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there are some who could tie, but i don't think anyone else in HOLLYWOOD History has had a greater disparity in the highs and lows of a career than UMA THURMAN, and she been at it since 1988.

That said, I liked the KILL BILL films a lot, and I even appreciated them after seeing LADY SNOWBLOOD- the Japanese film from which they are pretty clearly and openly derived.

it would have been well-deserved if Uma had gotten a Best Actress nomination for either one, but apparently Harvey didn't deem it so and pushed Meryl for the five minutes she actually acted in something instead (both years probably).

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6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

...and pushed Meryl for the five minutes she actually acted in something

That bad? Is there anything that she did that you even remotely approve of? What is it, her acting style? Or something else? Does it have something to do with Harvey? Is she just another liberal elite who talks too much? If so, what does that have to do with acting? I know she gets a lot of flack around here, but such a dismissively contemptuous and sarcastic pot shot like this is curious to me. Perhaps your attitude towards her is well known around here and I just don't know it. If so, just let this go. I don't want to start anything, Please understand, I am genuinely puzzled.

 

 

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The Shape of Water (2017) - Romantic fantasy from Fox Searchlight and writer-director Guillermo Del Toro. In Cold War era America, mute cleaning woman Elisa (Sally Hawkins) works in a government laboratory. One night a new specimen is delivered to a water tank in a highly secure area: a fish-man (Doug Jones), captured in South America where it had been worshiped by natives as a god. Elisa slowly develops a bond with the creature, and when it looks like his cruel captor Strickland (Michael Shannon) will supervise the being's vivisection, Elisa hatches a daring plan to set the fish-man free. Also featuring Richard Jenkins, Octavia Spencer, Michael Stuhlbarg, David Hewlett, Nick Searcy, Lauren Lee Smith, John Kapelos, and Nigel Bennett.

I've always found director Del Toro's Spanish-language films (Pan's LabyrinthThe Devil's BackboneCronos) to be superior to his English-language efforts (Mimic, the Hellboy movies, Crimson Peak, the dreadful Pacific Rim). I can say that I find The Shape of Water to easily be his best English film, although not quite up to the level of Pan's Labyrinth. Del Toro's films have the air of a fairy tale, and that's evident here, with characters drawn with broad strokes. The performances are all good, and while Hawkins, Jenkins and Spencer received the Oscar love with nominations for all three, I also thought Michael Stuhlbarg, as a sympathetic scientist, and Michael Shannon, as the psychotically driven villain, were just as good. Shannon, or more specifically his character, has been brought up as the film's weakest element, and while his character's position as the cruelty and corruption lying underneath placid Cold War America is an old trope, it's still a good one. My only real complaint, and it's rather minor, is that more could have been done to establish the creature's persona as the film progressed. As it stands, it seems that the film wants the audience to sympathize with the fish-man because, well, it's that kind of movie, rather than depicting many character-building moments. 

I know this movie has been blasted by more than one reviewer around here, and there are some gruesome moments and some moments of graphic nudity that may put off some viewers. But there is also an abundant love of classic movies on display, especially musicals, with many scenes appearing on TV in the movie, and songs from them featured on the soundtrack. Recommended.   (8/10)

Source: Fox Blu-ray.

ShapeOfWater01-e1511890303351.jpg

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6 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

The Shape of Water (2017) -

I doubt I'll ever watch this. The premise is a little off putting to me. A romantic story between a human and some sea creature? You didn't mention this in your review but I'm curious, is this is a tearjerker? Is the audience manipulated into warm and fuzzy? I won't prejudge as I have often like movies that I thought I might not but I will say that the premise doesn't excite me.

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17 minutes ago, laffite said:

The premise is a little off putting to me. A romantic story between a human and some sea creature?

I agree. A human and a sea creature? Gimme a break!

Now if the creature had come from a lagoon, that's another story.

CREATUREFROMTHEBLACK1520.jpg

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49 minutes ago, laffite said:

I doubt I'll ever watch this. The premise is a little off putting to me. A romantic story between a human and some sea creature? You didn't mention this in your review but I'm curious, is this is a tearjerker? Is the audience manipulated into warm and fuzzy? I won't prejudge as I have often like movies that I thought I might not but I will say that the premise doesn't excite me.

Well, it's a romantic fairy tale, so there's a certain degree of "warm & fuzzy", but it's always presented in a way that reminds the audience that this is some weird stuff going on. As I mentioned in my review, the creature isn't fully-fleshed out character-wise, and I'm guessing that was to retain some mystery to him. As far as the unsavory "man-and-beast" implications, I don't really see it, since the fish-man is sentient and humanoid and communicates in a fashion. 

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An addendum to my review of Call Me by Your Name: the ending of the film has stuck with me through the night, and into today, and it is quite unlike anything that I recall seeing before. I've decided to increase my rating of the movie from a 6/10 to a 7/10. I'll also mention that lead actor Timothee Chalamet's much-ballyhooed performance didn't impress me as much as it did others. I didn't think he was bad, and he was often quite good in some scenes, but nothing extraordinary. Until that final scene, that is, and now I agree that he earned that Best Actor nomination.

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1 hour ago, laffite said:

That bad? Is there anything that she did that you even remotely approve of? What is it, her acting style? Or something else? Does it have something to do with Harvey? Is she just another liberal elite who talks too much? If so, what does that have to do with acting? I know she gets a lot of flack around here, but such a dismissively contemptuous and sarcastic pot shot like this is curious to me. Perhaps your attitude towards her is well known around here and I just don't know it. If so, just let this go. I don't want to start anything, Please understand, I am genuinely puzzled.

 

 

I'm also curious as to the 'why' behind the very negative views some around here have of Streep.    She appears to be the Katherine Hepburn of her generation in that,  generally, people either have very positive feelings towards her, or negative ones. 

I can understand that excessive hype gets under one's skin (e.g the greatest actress of all time or her generation chants),   but I do find her to be one of the best actresses of her generation.   She communicates to me the emotions of the character she is playing very well IMO.      

As it relates to politics;  I don't mix how I feel about artist with politics.     

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I'm not an anti-Streep-ian, and in fact I rate her as among the greatest of all film actresses, but I can tell you what I've read in the past. As James points out, there's a natural tendency in some people to resent anyone, in any field, who gets praised a lot, and few have been praised as often as Streep.

Streep, though exceedingly versatile and renowned for her skill with accents that suit her various roles, is not without her own particular acting quirks and tricks, which can become more obvious the more of her appearances one sees. And to some people, when you can "see the wheels turning", the performance loses its appeal. I've heard the same about Tom Hanks, an actor that I don't regard in the same class as Streep, but one that I like nonetheless. However, many have stated a dislike for him due to his repeated vocal and physical tricks in his acting jobs. 

Back to Streep, many people also find her down-to-earth humility in interviews to be phony, and that's she's really a temperamental diva, something that I find hard to believe, and something that is not likely to be kept quiet in this day and age. 

An offshoot of the first complaint, that of overpraise, is that many find Streep's continued awards love to be "stealing" slots from other, "worthier", lesser known actresses. Of all of Streep's performances that have nabbed an Oscar nod, the only one that I felt was perhaps undeserved was in Music of the Heart (1999), but I've heard from others who praise it, so it's all subjective. 

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4 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I'm not an anti-Streep-ian, and in fact I rate her as among the greatest of all film actresses, but I can tell you what I've read in the past. As James points out, there's a natural tendency in some people to resent anyone, in any field, who gets praised a lot, and few have been praised as often as Streep.

Streep, though exceedingly versatile and renowned for her skill with accents that suit her various roles, is not without her own particular acting quirks and tricks, which can become more obvious the more of her appearances one sees. And to some people, when you can "see the wheels turning", the performance loses its appeal. I've heard the same about Tom Hanks, an actor that I don't regard in the same class as Streep, but one that I like nonetheless. However, many have stated a dislike for him due to his repeated vocal and physical tricks in his acting jobs. 

Back to Streep, many people also find her down-to-earth humility in interviews to be phony, and that's she's really a temperamental diva, something that I find hard to believe, and something that is not likely to be kept quiet in this day and age. 

An offshoot of the first complaint, that of overpraise, is that many find Streep's continued awards love to be "stealing" slots from other, "worthier", lesser known actresses. Of all of Streep's performances that have nabbed an Oscar nod, the only one that I felt was perhaps undeserved was in Music of the Heart (1999), but I've heard from others who praise it, so it's all subjective. 

There's nothing that some people like to do more than try to tear a person down off a pedestal. If that person wasn't so celebrated, they'd be looking for someone else to attack. It has ever been thus.

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1 hour ago, Fedya said:

Have you seen Miranda or Splash?

Del Toro seems to have seen Splash:

("But he directed Pan's Labyrinth!"...Yeah, and let's not get into those Spirit of the Beehive discussions, either.  Gil was probably kicking himself that someone else stuck Universal's 30's Frankenstein into some kid's Spanish-Civil-War childhood.)

1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

But there is also an abundant love of classic movies on display, especially musicals, with many scenes appearing on TV in the movie, and songs from them featured on the soundtrack.

Oh, so now that they finally got the Columbia UPA cartoons on DVD, Del Toro's moved on to classic musicals, and doesn't have to have Gerald McBoingBoing playing on every background set like in Hellboy and Blade II?

1 hour ago, TomJH said:

I agree. A human and a sea creature? Gimme a break!

Now if the creature had come from a lagoon, that's another story.

Well, like Marilyn Monroe said, maybe he just wanted a little love.  ^_^

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Arabian Nights (1942) - Silly Technicolor adventure from Universal Pictures and director John Rawlins. In ancient times, the caliph of Baghdad, Haroun-Al-Raschid (Jon Hall), has his throne taken from him by his treacherous brother Kamar (Leif Erickson). The caliph is a fugitive marked for death, but he's rescued by acrobatic performer Ali Ben Ali (Sabu) who introduces the former leader to beautiful dancing girl Sherazade (Maria Montez). All three team up to win back the caliph's throne. Also featuring Billy Gilbert, Shemp Howard, Edgar Barrier, Richard Lane, John Qualen, William "Wee Willie" Davis, Thomas Gomez, Robert Greig, Turhan Bey, and Acquanetta.

This goofy distraction was a big hit with wartime audiences looking to escape the horrors and worries of the time. And this is certainly "leave your brain at the door" entertainment, as it's dopey, has little in common with the source stories, and is targeted at the least discerning of viewers. It fails to live up to the overheated camp heights of noted Montez-Hall team-up Cobra Woman, though, and that lack of kitsch makes this a more tedious slog. Billy Gilbert's performance, in which he seems to scream most of his dialogue, also becomes nails-on-a-chalkboard irritating. As ridiculous as the movie is, it earned 4 Oscar nominations, for Best Score, Best Cinematography, Best Sound, and Best Art Direction.   (5/10)

Source: Universal DVD.

8970-2.jpg

 

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15 minutes ago, EricJ said:

Del Toro seems to have seen Splash

You mean that the girl actually kisses the creature like that? Gimme a break! :rolleyes:

Easy Laffite, after all you haven't seen the picture. Maybe you need context ...

Okay, maybe ... but it better be good :D 

 

 

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21 minutes ago, laffite said:

You mean that the girl actually kisses the creature like that? Gimme a break! :rolleyes:

Easy Laffite, after all you haven't seen the picture. Maybe you need context ...

Okay, maybe ... but it better be good :D 

 

 

s-l300.jpg

"Kiss me, you fool."

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40 minutes ago, laffite said:

You mean that the girl actually kisses the creature like that? Gimme a break! :rolleyes:

Easy Laffite, after all you haven't seen the picture. Maybe you need context ...

Okay, maybe ... but it better be good :D 

Yeah, like maybe you need to watch the clip first--It's funnier that way.  :lol:

(Remember that "Forrest Gump vs. Curious Case of Benjamin Button" one a few years ago when that one was up for Oscars?  This is worse.)

17 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

This new fish-dude looks slightly more human.

515a7e6a713c3062573d984cf1171f2b.jpg

At least, more human than Del Toro's last soulful/sensitive Black Lagoon fish-dude-in-love, but at least that one already came from a comic book:

3cb0b5eddecb9cfcaca42d04dcc9b30a.jpg

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6 minutes ago, EricJ said:

Yeah, like maybe you need to watch the clip first--It's funnier that way.  :lol:

Actually I did not even think to watch the clip (as you seem to have realized).

Seriously, I don't think I want to.

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1 minute ago, laffite said:

Actually I did not even think to watch the clip (as you seem to have realized).

Seriously, I don't think I want to.

(TL;DW version:  What if you replaced Sally Hawkins with Eugene Levy?) 

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35 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Princess_and_the_Frog.jpg

or how about

beautyandbeast.jpg

Again, a fairy tale and an animated one at that. I approve that on the basis that I am not nauseated by it.

Cute response the TBANB, good one Lawrence ... but did they actually kiss? If they did I'm quite sure it wasn't a spit swapper that Shape looks like.

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This thread is starting to smell like week-old seafood. I preferred talking about why Meryl Streep is or is not terrible. Or the fact that Shemp Howard played Sinbad in Arabian Nights. You know, important stuff.

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22 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

 Or the fact that Shemp Howard played Sinbad in Arabian Nights. You know, important stuff.

I could take a standard whitebread 40's Hollywood-imitation Arabian Nights, if it was, y'know, "Thief of Bagdad", or Harryhausen's Sinbad, or something like that--

But when we not only get Shemp Howard as a low-comedy-relief shipless Sinbad who annoys everyone with bragging about his travels, but also teamed with John Qualen as low-comedy-relief Aladdin who has to take co-stooge jobs because he lost his lamp...This movie not only slaps you in the face for expecting the book, it directly slaps you in the face with the book for expecting it, just to be nasty about it.  :angry:

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