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Mysterious Mr. Moto (1938) - Fifth entry in the mystery series, and the third released in 1938, from 20th Century Fox and director Norman Foster. Moto (Peter Lorre) is undercover once again, this time as a Devil's Island prisoner who helps criminal Paul Brissac (Leon Ames) escape. Moto does so to get in Brissac's good graces, and, traveling with him to London, takes a job as the man's valet. This is all so that Moto can infiltrate the League of Assassins, a shadowy criminal organization whose leader is unknown, and who are currently targeting steel magnate Anton Darvak (Henry Wilcoxon). Also featuring Harold Huber, Mary Maguire, Erik Rhodes, Forrester Harvey, Frederick Vogeding, Lester Matthews, and Lotus Long.

Moto's occupation as an agent for Interpol is finally clearly delineated, and this outing seems more like a spy/espionage tale than the previous films. Lorre is still a lot of fun, getting to try out a few more disguises, although to be honest, his distinctive voice should be a clue to those he's trying to trick. Overall, this was another enjoyable diversion.  (7/10)

Source: YouTube.

6a00d8341d6d8d53ef01a511b2e26e970c-450wi 

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Overland Stage Raiders (1938) - B Western, the 18th in a series, from Republic Pictures and director George Sherman. The Three Mequiteers are Stony Brooke (John Wayne), Tucson Smith (Ray Corrigan), and Lullaby Joslin (Max Terhune). They get into various adventures in the modern US west, although the action more closely resembles the 19th century era. In this installment, the 3 heroes invest their money in a new airline service run by brother-and-sister team Ned Hoyt (Anthony Marsh) and Beth Hoyt (Louise Brooks). When a gang of bandits hijack the plane to steal a gold shipment, the Mesquiteers have to save the day. Also featuring Arch Hall Sr., John Archer, Gordon Hart, Roy James, Olin Francis, Fern Emmett, Henry Otho, and Yakima Canutt.

This is standard B western fare, although the mixing of traditional western details, such as horseback riding, six-shooters and cattle ranching, with then-modern touches like airplanes and motor vehicles, is unusual. The most memorable aspect of this film is that it's the final credit for silent screen icon Louise Brooks, who quit the business after this minor effort. I liked seeing future Z-movie stalwart Arch Hall Sr. playing a creep.  (5/10)

Source: YouTube.

overland-stage-raiders-movie-poster-md.j

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"Such is Life" (1924) movie short  on TCM.

Where did they found this film?  Hope others are out there. Lucky I saw this earlier on the Directv guide, gave me enough time to record it to DVD.

The birthday party scene was a riot, Baby Peggy ask the butler for a hammer and he brought it on a silver platter. :lol:

Such-is-Life.jpg

 

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On 4/7/2018 at 2:54 PM, speedracer5 said:

I like noir and I oddly find serial killers fascinating. Note: I don't find serial killers admirable, just interesting. 

Maybe you would like Dexter. This is a modern day TV mini-series, a far cry from an old movie. I couldn't take it, I don't have your fascination with these characters. Dexter is a killer who targets serial killers only, thus making himself one. There was a graphic torture scene in Ep-1. Not for me.

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5 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Overland Stage Raiders (1938) - B Western, the 18th in a series, from Republic Pictures and director George Sherman. The Three Mequiteers are Stony Brooke (John Wayne), Tucson Smith (Ray Corrigan), and Lullaby Joslin (Max Terhune). They get into various adventures in the modern US west, although the action more closely resembles the 19th century era. In this installment, the 3 heroes invest their money in a new airline service run by brother-and-sister team Ned Hoyt (Anthony Marsh) and Beth Hoyt (Louise Brooks). When a gang of bandits hijack the plane to steal a gold shipment, the Mesquiteers have to save the day. Also featuring Arch Hall Sr., John Archer, Gordon Hart, Roy James, Olin Francis, Fern Emmett, Henry Otho, and Yakima Canutt.

This is standard B western fare, although the mixing of traditional western details, such as horseback riding, six-shooters and cattle ranching, with then-modern touches like airplanes and motor vehicles, is unusual. The most memorable aspect of this film is that it's the final credit for silent screen icon Louise Brooks, who quit the business after this minor effort. I liked seeing future Z-movie stalwart Arch Hall Sr. playing a creep.  (5/10)

Source: YouTube.

overland-stage-raiders-movie-poster-md.j

1002 ???

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House by the River (1950) a Victorian Era Film Noir

House by the River Poster

A failed writer (Louis Hayward) accidentily murders the cute new maid (Dorothy Patrick) while his wife (Jane Wyatt) is out of the house visiting. He gets his invalid brother (Lee Bowman) to help him dispose of the body in the river by telling him that his wife is pregnant and that the shock might make her loose the baby. The body, concealed in a wood collection bag, pops to the surface and flows back and forth in front of the house driving the writer insane as he chases after it night after night through the flooded tidal islands and marsh grasses in a rowboat. When the body is finally discovered and an inquiery is made, the writer has no qualms letting his brother take the brunt of the courts suspicions. The sequences on the river are a bit reminicent of Night of the Hunter. 7/10

 

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Yesterday I saw A Man Escaped. A very good film by Bresson about the anti-Fascist struggle during the days of occupation. A man imprisoned by the Nazis makes a daring escape from the prison with a young boy locked up in the same cell. It was a very good film.

Editors-Pick-A-Man-Escaped.jpg

I also saw Down by Law, a movie about three eccentric inmates making an escape in the Louisiana bayou. Both films were good and I recommend them.

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4 hours ago, laffite said:

Maybe you would like Dexter. This is a modern day TV mini-series, a far cry from an old movie. I couldn't take it, I don't have your fascination with these characters. Dexter is a killer who targets serial killers only, thus making himself one. There was a graphic torture scene in Ep-1. Not for me.

I've seen a couple episodes of that show.  It didn't do anything for me.  I remember actually being bored with it.  I find there are very few new shows that hold my interest.  

I don't want to actually see the murders or anything like that; I just find the serial killers' method of targeting their victims and not getting caught for such a long time to be interesting.  Many of the serial killers were very brazen in their attacks as well.  Often they'd end up getting caught by doing something stupid or being recognized by some random person or something. 

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i caught THE LODGER (1944) on TCM ON DEMAND.

I'm glad this Fox Film has finally shown up on TCM, although I was a little disappointed the print was a tad washed out (very noticeable in the dance hall scenes.) it's a good film, although not a great film, but it did pave the way for director John Brahm's masterpiece HANGOVER SQUARE, which is one of my ten favorite films of the 1940's (one could also argue it was an influence on THE SPIRAL STAIRCASE (1946) as it has a graphic and shocking pair of murders filmed from the killer's POV, one of which was apparently so effective, Zanuck had it moved to the very first scene in the film.)

in a way, THE 1944 LODGER is to Hitchcock's silent version what FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT is to REBECCA- a chance (albeit by a different director) to redeem an anti-climax with a whiz-bang finale. in the original version, a lot is left hanging at the end and one could possibly be left with a sense of unfulfillment- that is not so in the case of the 1944 film, which has a well-shot and edited, action-packed finale not entirely unlike the climax of the 1926 PHANTOM OF THE OPERA.

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I Take This Woman (1931)

Paramount programmer about a high energy socialite (Carole Lombard) sent to a ranch in Wyoming by her wealthy father. There she meets and falls for a cowboy (Gary Cooper) who she will marry and then be disowned by her father for doing so. But life on a small ranch is anything but exciting for the socialite and soon she regrets her impulsive decision to marry this man.

This film romance is pretty ordinary. Cooper was still developing his "Aw shucks" screen persona. He seems gangly and a bit awkward in some scenes, but quietly effective in a few others. There's a scene in which he brings an orphaned calf into his small home, informing his wife it will have to live with them during the harsh winter, much to Lombard's horror. His low key naturalism is rather effective here, I thought, though, admittedly it's just a short scene. Far better things were yet to come in his career.

Lombard was never particularly interesting to me as an actress in any of her films made before 20th Century, the film in which the world discovered she could play screwball comedy. Her performance in this little drama is quite adequate but could have been equaled or bettered by any of a number of other actresses in Hollywood at the time. The primary interest here is the unique opportunity to see two legendary film names sharing the screen for the only time.

The story behind I Take This Woman is considerably more interesting than the film itself. Cooper and Lombard apparently had a brief affair while making the film. Neither actor talked much about it. Well, not Cooper anyway. Apparently it did cause some awkwardness in Cooper's later relations with Clark Gable on their occasional hunting excursions together, however, since Carole had apparently thrown Coop's well known sexual prowess into Clark's face on occasion. Ouch!

Also of interest, for years I Take This Woman was unavailable for viewing, as rights to the film had reverted back to its author, Mary Roberts Rinehart. She had possession of the original 35mm print but had no interest in it or its storage. A restoration of (I believe) a 16mm print of the film was performed by UCLA Film and Television Archive, with a March, 2017 screening of same at UCLA. That print was, I believe, the only print of the film still known to exist.

I was shocked to stumble across a video of I Take This Woman on You Tube, where there are still a couple of prints of the film today.

ITakeThisWoman_470x350.jpg

2 out of 4

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Pals of the Saddle (1938) - Another Mesquiteers western from Republic Pictures and director George Sherman. The Three Mesquiteers (John Wayne, Ray Corrigan, and Max Terhune) are on the hunt for bad guys who are out to steal a deadly gas called Monium that was developed for use in WW1. Also featuring Doreen McKay, Joseph Forte, George Douglas, Frank Milan, Ted Adams, Jack Kirk, and Yakima Canutt.

This was the first in the series to feature John Wayne. He certainly dominates the proceedings, getting more screen time and storyline than the other two. There were more to follow.   (5/10)

Source: YouTube, a really awful print.

laffite: this was John Wayne movie #109 for me.

l4407UoPtKqEGNIQynkL4nxGiUi.jpg

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5 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

House by the River (1950) a Victorian Era Film Noir

House by the River Poster

A failed writer (Louis Hayward) accidentily murders the cute new maid (Dorothy Patrick) while his wife (Jane Wyatt) is out of the house visiting. He gets his invalid brother (Lee Bowman) to help him dispose of the body in the river by telling him that his wife is pregnant and that the shock might make her loose the baby. The body, concealed in a wood collection bag, pops to the surface and flows back and forth in front of the house driving the writer insane as he chases after it night after night through the flooded tidal islands and marsh grasses in a rowboat. When the body is finally discovered and an inquiery is made, the writer has no qualms letting his brother take the brunt of the courts suspicions. The sequences on the river are a bit reminicent of Night of the Hunter. 7/10

 

Sounds interesting.   But can one 'accidentally murder'  someone?    Isn't the different between homicide and murder based on intent?   I.e. if it really is accidentally,  isn't that homicide instead of murder?  

I see this was directed by Fritz Lang;  Maybe this film influenced Laughton in Night of the Hunter (which clearly has a German Expressionism influence).

 

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22 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Sounds interesting.   But can one 'accidentally murder'  someone?    Isn't the different between homicide and murder based on intent?   I.e. if it really is accidentally,  isn't that homicide instead of murder?  

As I recall, he's trying to silence her screams and strangles her..I'd say it was manslaughter/attempted rape, and of course illegal disposal of a body..anyway, it was a good film!..lots of 'dark' watery images, dark rooms, but without the shadows of German Expressionism

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Red River Range (1938) - More Three Mesquiteers from Republic Pictures and director George Sherman. The Mesquiteers (John Wayne, Ray Corrignan, and Max Terhune) are after cattle rustlers this time around. Their investigation leads to one of them pretending to be an escaped killer so as to infiltrate the bad guy gang, while Tex Reilly (Kirby Grant) pretends to be one of the Mesquiteers. Also featuring Polly Moran, Lorna Gray, Sammy McKim, William Royle, Perry Ivins, Stanley Blystone, and Fred "Snowflake" Toones.

This is more western mixed with the modern world, with refrigerated trucks and horses sharing scenes. There's nothing to distinguish this from the others in the series of B westerns.  (5/10)

Source: YouTube, with a nice print uploaded from a TCM HD broadcast.

laffite: #110!!

Red+River+Range.jpg 

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22 minutes ago, shutoo said:

As I recall, he's trying to silence her screams and strangles her..I'd say it was manslaughter/attempted rape, and of course illegal disposal of a body..anyway, it was a good film!..lots of 'dark' watery images, dark rooms, but without the shadows of German Expressionism

If the crime entails disposing of the body, then it should be first-degree murder, shouldn't it?

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23 hours ago, rosebette said:

The Rains Came(1939) -- we weren't going to watch this one because it started too late, but ended up getting hooked.  Rather amazed that Myrna Loy plays a woman who probably qualifies as an upper-class s**** and yet somehow manages to be charming and sympathetic.  George Brent was pretty good, too. Tyrone Power was knock out gorgeous and had that proper spiritual/mystical quality as the Indian doctor.  Yes, his eyelashes were longer than either of the leading ladies' (and they were probably wearing false ones or lots of mascara).  Despite the statue of Queen Victoria, I was rather surprised that the portrait of colonial India was not that rah-rah British Empire; the English were depicted as rather greedy and corrupt (Nigel Bruce, Myrna Loy, the social-climbing missionary parents of Brenda Joyce), rather like Indian Summer on PBS last year, but without the sex (although there is definitely implied sex with Loy's character).  The special effects were astounding, well-deserving of the Academy Award.

TP (as I like to refer to him) may be "gorgeous" but he was his usual blandness. Brenda Joyce was a Simon, not an Esketh. Or do you mean Missionary "parents." George Brent was excellent as Ransome.

I like English colonialism as backdrop and my fave is The Jewel in the Crown, not only the PBS series but the books as well. And as such I was deeply disappointed in Indian Summer. Most scenes were overwrought with long takes and the expense of a natural spontaneity. I can hardly believe that the great Andrew Davis had anything to do with this. Although PBS (or more properly BBC) did this it was a departure from what is sometime referred to as "Classic Masterpiece" and more to do with a new "updated" Masterpiece meant to appeal to a wider audience. Folks who like Indian Summer would probably be bored by Jewel, generally speaking IMO.

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29 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I believe first degree has to be premeditated. I don't think after-the-fact disposal constitutes premeditation.

Disposing of the body implies more than just manslaughter. I wouldn't call it after-the-fact, it's a part of the fact. It implies prior intent. The perpetrator might not have had prior intent but a prosecutor would jump all over the disposal thing. How about second-degree then? BTW, I don't know the movie, just speaking generally. And of course I'm no lawyer, haha ... but disposing of the body is serious, I would think.

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On 4/8/2018 at 5:45 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

(Sometimes, you learn a hell of a lot more about filmmaking from watching it done badly than watching it done really well

How Oscar of you to come up with this. Wilde, that is. He would be proud.

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19 minutes ago, laffite said:

TP (as I like to refer to him) may be "gorgeous" but he was his usual blandness. Brenda Joyce was a Simon, not an Esketh. Or do you mean Missionary "parents." George Brent was excellent as Ransome.

Yes,  Power was bland and he didn't even try to have that unique and highly appealing accent those educated like his character typically have.     Did Power's blandness bring Brent out of his?    

I found Brenda Joyce to be very good,  especially since this was her first film.    I had to look her up and this performance didn't really help her get roles in high quality films.    

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1 minute ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Yes,  Power was bland and he didn't even try to have that unique and highly appealing accent those educated like his character typically have.     Did Power's blandness bring Brent out of his?    

Nice jab. Yes, Brent has been the brunt of bland, critically, but the thought didn't even come to me here. Brenda Joyce was a sweetie,

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Tyrone Power was blessed with a gorgeous face and a lot of charisma , but his weak spot for me is his voice. It's somewhat nasally and not terribly interesting – which is a real fault for an actor. I think he had to work extremely hard to overcome that voice . 

He is flawless in NIGHTMARE ALLEY, it's truly as good work AS  I've ever seen any actor do , so I give him a lot of credit for that. I think if he had not died so young he might well have gotten some really good parts in his later years. 

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