Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

SPOILER ALERT!

 

I think the main reason Ray wasnt happy with the film was because the original ending was much bleaker. Ryan heads back to the city w/out Ida. The studio made him reshoot the ending and made it more upbeat. I'm fine with the ending as is. It doesnt feel tacked on at all to me. Just a natural progession and entirely believable as Ryan's burnt out character was changing from his experience with Ida and her brother....

Link to post
Share on other sites

in case anyone is curious, here is the part about Herrmann's score in the wiki entry on the film.

It sounds like they had way more people working on the score than the entire crew of the picture.

 

Music

The film score was composed by Bernard Herrmann (1911–1975). Instrumentation: piccolo, 3 flutes, 2 oboes, an English horn, 2 clarinets, bass clarinet, 2 bassoons, contrabassoon, 8 horns, 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, bass drum, tam-tam, bell plate, piano, solo viola d’amore and strings.

Herrmann wanted to use an obscure baroque instrument, the viola d'amore, to symbolize Mary Malden's isolation and loneliness. The sound of the instrument can be heard much of the time she is on-screen. Herrmann was so impressed with viola d'amorist Virginia Majewski's performance that he wanted her credited in the film. Nicholas Ray told him "There aren't enough cards," so Herrmann replied, "Put her on mine." In the film's opening credits, Bernard Herrmann's credit reads, "Music by Bernard Herrmann — Viola d'Amour played by Virginia Majewski." [6]

At the 35:25 mark, listeners can hear a sequence that Herrmann reused in 1957 as the well-known opening theme to the television series Have Gun Will Travel starring Richard Boone. The scoring in the film version is only slightly different from that in the better-known TV theme; the sequence in which this theme appears also contains other fragments of incidental music later adapted for use in the TV show.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

All the Money in the World (2017) - True-story crime drama from TriStar Pictures and director Ridley Scott. The film tells the story of the 1973 kidnapping of J. Paul Getty III (Charlie Plummer). He's held for an exorbitant ransom, but the kidnappers figure that since the young man's grandfather is J. Paul Getty (Christopher Plummer), the richest man in the world, he shouldn't have a problem paying it. They don't know Getty, a notorious cheapskate and skinflint who first refuses to pay any ransom, and then tries to negotiate it down to only an amount that is tax deductible. This naturally infuriates the boy's mother Gail Harris (Michelle Williams), who works with Getty family security chief Fletcher Chase (Mark Wahlberg) on getting the boy home safely. Also featuring Romain Duris, Timothy Hutton, Charlie Shotwell, Andrew Buchan, and Marco Leonardi.

Director Scott keeps things moving swiftly along, offering various snapshot flashbacks to moments in the Getty family past to help illustrate the unique familial ties at play. Michelle Williams continues to show an amazing amount of range in her characterizations and accent work. Wahlberg has little to do, and is at times a distraction, although he gets a good "telling 'em off" scene near the end. Charlie Plummer (no relation to Christopher) is good as the unfortunate kidnap victim, and I was impressed with Romain Duris as a sympathetic kidnapper. But all eyes were on Christopher Plummer when this was released, thanks to all of the controversy. As most will recall, original co-star Kevin Spacey became the focus of much public outrage after accusations against him were made, and director Scott and the film's other producers made the unusual decision to completely reshoot his scenes with Plummer in the role, all mere weeks before the movie's scheduled release. Not only did they succeed, but I can't imagine Spacey being nearly as good as Plummer is as the soulless Getty patriarch. Plummer's Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor has been viewed by many as acknowledging the logistical accomplishment, as well as support of the #MeToo movement, as much as for the actual performance. But while I could argue that Plummer's is actually a co-leading role, I will say that his nomination was warranted for the acting job.   (7/10)

Source: Sony Blu-ray.

All%20the%20Money%20in%20the%20World.jpg

MV5BN2Q2NzkwN2ItYmY0MC00ODA3LThjOWYtOGY4

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Intermezzo: A Love Story (1939) - Overheated romance from United Artists, David O. Selznick, and director Gregory Ratoff. Leslie Howard stars as Holger Brandt, a world-renowned concert violinist who is returning home after a lengthy tour. He's happy to be reunited with his wife (Edna Best) and his children, but things get complicated when Holger falls for Anita Hoffman (Ingrid Bergman), the piano teacher to his young daughter. Their love becomes all-encompassing, leading Holger to leave his family to be with Anita. But will the call of family prove too strong to ignore? Also featuring John Halliday, Cecil Kellaway, Enid Bennett, Douglas Scott, and Ann E. Todd as Ann Marie.

This was a remake of a 1936 Swedish film that had also starred Bergman. This was an important film to Howard, who took the role of Ashley in Selznick's Gone with the Wind in order to get this movie made. It's more than a little corny, and I found the score to be intrusive and manipulative to an almost laughable degree. I also liked the initial "love" scene between Howard and Bergman, when she plays piano accompaniment to his violin playing, the two in deep concentration, while his horrified family and friends look on as if the two musicians are literally having sex in front of them. It's amusing, but not in the way it was intended, I would think. The movie earned two Oscar nominations, for Best Cinematography and Best Score.   (6/10)

Source: YouTube.

intermezzo-a-love-story-poster-292x400.j

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Wahlberg has little to do, and is at times a distraction, although he gets a good "telling 'em off" scene near the end.

'distraction' fits--he attempts a whispery/throaty 'private-eye cool voice' that sounded oddly forced..and an attempt to give him deep forehead wrinkles photographed like vertical eyeliner.  I wasn't wild about the film over all..something just seemed off

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

All the Money in the World (2017) - True-story crime drama from TriStar Pictures and director Ridley Scott. The film tells the story of the 1973 kidnapping of J. Paul Getty III (Charlie Plummer). He's held for an exorbitant ransom, but the kidnappers figure that since the young man's grandfather is J. Paul Getty (Christopher Plummer), the richest man in the world, he shouldn't have a problem paying it. They don't know Getty, a notorious cheapskate and skinflint who first refuses to pay any ransom, and then tries to negotiate it down to only an amount that is tax deductible. This naturally infuriates the boy's mother Gail Harris (Michelle Williams), who works with Getty family security chief Fletcher Chase (Mark Wahlberg) on getting the boy home safely. Also featuring Romain Duris, Timothy Hutton, Charlie Shotwell, Andrew Buchan, and Marco Leonardi.

Director Scott keeps things moving swiftly along, offering various snapshot flashbacks to moments in the Getty family past to help illustrate the unique familial ties at play. Michelle Williams continues to show an amazing amount of range in her characterizations and accent work. Wahlberg has little to do, and is at times a distraction, although he gets a good "telling 'em off" scene near the end. Charlie Plummer (no relation to Christopher) is good as the unfortunate kidnap victim, and I was impressed with Romain Duris as a sympathetic kidnapper. But all eyes were on Christopher Plummer when this was released, thanks to all of the controversy. As most will recall, original co-star Kevin Spacey became the focus of much public outrage after accusations against him were made, and director Scott and the film's other producers made the unusual decision to completely reshoot his scenes with Plummer in the role, all mere weeks before the movie's scheduled release. Not only did they succeed, but I can't imagine Spacey being nearly as good as Plummer is as the soulless Getty patriarch. Plummer's Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor has been viewed by many as acknowledging the logistical accomplishment, as well as support of the #MeToo movement, as much as for the actual performance. But while I could argue that Plummer's is actually a co-leading role, I will say that his nomination was warranted for the acting job.   (7/10)

Source: Sony Blu-ray.

All%20the%20Money%20in%20the%20World.jpg

MV5BN2Q2NzkwN2ItYmY0MC00ODA3LThjOWYtOGY4

Scumbag that he may be, as far as his acting abilities go, I wouldn't sell Spacey short. He is(was) capable of turning in many fine performances and I think he probably could have done the role justice as well, but we will never know. 

Having said that, I think Plummer did a damn great acting job in here. He's always watchable in any movie he's in.

I doubt very much we'll be seeing Spacey on screen any time soon, if ever.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Scumbag that he may be, as far as his acting abilities go, I wouldn't sell Spacey short. He is(was) capable of turning in many fine performances and I think he probably could have done the role justice as well, but we will never know. 

Having said that, I think Plummer did a damn great acting job in here. He's always watchable in any movie he's in.

I doubt very much we'll be seeing Spacey on screen any time soon, if ever.

Oh, I agree that Spacey is/was a good actor in many things. I think he got lazy for a while and then headed to the UK to the theater world when it started to catch up to him. I never watched his work on House of Cards, but he'd made a few more good movies in recent years. 

My assessment was more based on Plummer being closer to the proper age for the elder Getty, whereas Spacey was covered in latex to age him, and from the stills and original trailers, he looked "off" somewhat. Ridley Scott has stated that Christopher Plummer was his original choice for the role, but during that time Plummer was unavailable. I'm not a particular fan of Plummer's although I don't have anything against him either. Spacey, on the other hand, is an actor whose work I'm trying to see, and that hasn't changed due to the scandals, either.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

All the Money in the World (2017) -

MV5BN2Q2NzkwN2ItYmY0MC00ODA3LThjOWYtOGY4

Christopher Plummer, truly a class act (the actor, that is, not the character he plays in this film). Great to see that he is still getting strong roles this late in life. This man will undoubtedly go out with his acting boots on.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Phantom Thread (2017) - A most unusual romance, from Focus Features, Annapurna, and writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson. In early 1950's Britain, Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis) is the most sought-after dress designer among the rich and powerful. He lives a regimented, almost monastic life, with his watchful sister Cyril (Lesley Manville) as his close associate. One day Reynolds meets waitress Alma (Vicky Krieps) and takes her on as his muse, model, lover, whatever he needs. Alma learns that she's not the first to fill this position in Reynolds' life, but she becomes determined to be the last. Also featuring Camilla Rutherford, Gina McKee, Brian Gleeson, Harriet Sansom Harris, Lujza Richter, and Julia Davis.

I could care less about the fashion world or Haute Couture, and yet I still was drawn into the single-minded obsessive artistry of Reynolds' world, his strict discipline and pursuit of perfection within his chosen field. Alma acts as an audience surrogate, unsure of this odd world led by the often inscrutable Reynolds and Cyril, the latter of whom often has the charm of an asp. But as Alma begins to see the way things work in this cloistered, rarefied world, she begins to find ways to upset it and bend it to her advantage. Cyril is naturally distrusting of this latest distraction, but Reynolds seems to find something in this new, shaky lifestyle of uncertainty.

The performances are fantastic, with Day-Lewis once laying claim to the title of greatest actor of his generation. He complex, unique yet very real, without a single false note. Manville was also singled out for awards consideration, and she's scary, pitiful, powerful, and voice for order and tradition. Vicky Krieps, a native of Luxembourg, is subtle, sharp, and a match for Day-Lewis as the seemingly simple, unworldly Alma. I hope to see her in more.

The filmmaking is concise and largely unobtrusive, letting the characters do the work, often with silent looks and facial expressions. Director Anderson did not use a Director of Photography on this, instead working with the camera operators themselves. The result is spontaneous but not amateur looking, with a slight gritty haze that makes many scenes almost dream-like. It's not a look that I would like to see in a lot of films, but it works here among the chilly environments both exterior and interior. The score by Jonny Greenwood, guitarist and songwriter from Radiohead, is surprisingly subdued, mainly light piano pieces, with some flourishes when needed. 

I won't pretend that a lot of viewers will like this, as they find it slow, pretentious, boring, or pointless. I certainly did not, and found it a deep, and even deeply disturbing, look at a unique type of love fostered by unusual people, told in a compelling, if quiet, way. This is more for the Masterpiece Theatre crowd than the Fast and the Furious crowd. I would rank this among the very best of the year. Highly Recommended.   (9/10)

Source: Universal Blu-ray.

ntaniel-ntei-liouis-stin-athina-gia-tin-

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Hibi said:

I think the main reason Ray wasnt happy with the film was because the original ending was much bleaker. Ryan heads back to the city w/out Ida. The studio made him reshoot the ending and made it more upbeat. I'm fine with the ending as is. It doesnt feel tacked on at all to me. Just a natural progession and entirely believable as Ryan's burnt out character was changing from his experience with Ida and her brother....

Yes, I believe that's right. Ray beefed up the "cop on the edge" early part of the film. To my mind, there's so much of this that it unbalances the film; ten minutes would have been plenty. Granted, this view of a cop's life would have been much fresher in 1951 than it is now. For me, the film doesn't really start until Ryan goes to the snow country, but from there on it's triumph all the way. The bleak ending would not have worked at all, for my taste; Ray essentially wanted to make a downbeat 1970s film twenty years before the fact.

Robert Ryan and Ida Lupino are both amazing. I believe I picked them as the best of this year when we were doing the year-by-year awards, and the competition, especially among the men, for this year is fierce. Did Ward Bond ever give a better performance than his grieving and vengeful father in this film?

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for acknowledging Ward Bond's contribution to On Dangerous Ground, kingrat. In extolling the virtues of this film, I think there's a tendency by some to overlook his performance which certainly adds to the tension in some scenes.

Along with his portrayals in Gentleman Jim (as the bellicose John L. Sullivan) and The Searchers, I think this is the best work I've ever seen of Bond.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, kingrat said:

[in re: ON DANGEROUS GROUND] Did Ward Bond ever give a better performance than his grieving and vengeful father in this film?

 

Not that I can think of, which makes the vicious dismissal of his work in Bosely Crowther's NYT review all the more galling. One kinda can't help but wonder if there was something personal going on in Crowther's attack; I *think* it was around the time of the film's release that Bond appeared as a "friendly witness" before the HUAC and "named names"- although I have no idea if this coincided with the release of ON DANGEROUS GROUND or not tho, and it doesn't explain the off-the-mark vitriol he holds for Lupino's work (how anyone could find her performance in the movie "mawkish" or "stagey" is beyond me.)

Bond's conservative hardline had to've made for some on-set tension between him and Ryan- who was a big time liberal, and I can't help but feel like that only adds to the subtext of the film and the dichotomy between the two men onscreen though.

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, kingrat said:

Yes, I believe that's right. Ray beefed up the "cop on the edge" early part of the film. To my mind, there's so much of this that it unbalances the film; ten minutes would have been plenty. Granted, this view of a cop's life would have been much fresher in 1951 than it is now. For me, the film doesn't really start until Ryan goes to the snow country, but from there on it's triumph all the way. The bleak ending would not have worked at all, for my taste; Ray essentially wanted to make a downbeat 1970s film twenty years before the fact.

Robert Ryan and Ida Lupino are both amazing. I believe I picked them as the best of this year when we were doing the year-by-year awards, and the competition, especially among the men, for this year is fierce. Did Ward Bond ever give a better performance than his grieving and vengeful father in this film?

 

Yes, I agree, the city part of the film runs on a bit too long. I found that scene where Ryan beats up the guy rather sadomasochistic. The guy seems to be egging Ryan on and Ryan enjoys it.....

Link to post
Share on other sites

hmmm.

well, i have to admit that my most recent viewing of ON DANGEROUS GROUND started late- and right at the point when Ryan arrives in "Snow Country" (wouldn't that make an intriguing alternate title for this?)- so I missed the whole city part, but it's never bothered me before, even Ryan's somewhat polarizing scene where he beats the guy up ie: "WHY DO YOU MAKE ME DO IT???!!!"

The film itself is only something like an hour and 17 minutes long (par for the course for an RKO thriller of the era), to me, it fills the running time perfectly- if you cut the city scenes, you'd pretty much be left with an episode of Kraft Theater.

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Intermezzo: A Love Story (1939) - Overheated romance from United Artists, David O. Selznick, and director Gregory Ratoff. Leslie Howard stars as Holger Brandt, a world-renowned concert violinist who is returning home after a lengthy tour. He's happy to be reunited with his wife (Edna Best) and his children, but things get complicated when Holger falls for Anita Hoffman (Ingrid Bergman), the piano teacher to his young daughter. Their love becomes all-encompassing, leading Holger to leave his family to be with Anita. But will the call of family prove too strong to ignore? Also featuring John Halliday, Cecil Kellaway, Enid Bennett, Douglas Scott, and Ann E. Todd as Ann Marie.

This was a remake of a 1936 Swedish film that had also starred Bergman. This was an important film to Howard, who took the role of Ashley in Selznick's Gone with the Wind in order to get this movie made. It's more than a little corny, and I found the score to be intrusive and manipulative to an almost laughable degree. I also liked the initial "love" scene between Howard and Bergman, when she plays piano accompaniment to his violin playing, the two in deep concentration, while his horrified family and friends look on as if the two musicians are literally having sex in front of them. It's amusing, but not in the way it was intended, I would think. The movie earned two Oscar nominations, for Best Cinematography and Best Score.   (6/10)

Source: YouTube.

intermezzo-a-love-story-poster-292x400.j

I guess I'm a silly romantic because I would rate this 8\10.    I believe the affair is handled with grace and style and the Howard character doesn't come off as just a cad out to 'have it all'.    The scenes between husband and wife are done well and I like the music: Bergman is really playing the piano (not on the score but she learned the music so those are her hands).    Even my wife was charmed by the romance (and typically she has very strong feelings towards such a husband \ film,  but I didn't get the snake-eye while she watched this one!).

Of course maybe just that Bergman smile overwhelmed me that I'm overrating the film.   :D

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I guess I'm a silly romantic because I would rate this 8\10.    I believe the affair is handled with grace and style and the Howard character doesn't come off as just a cad out to 'have it all'.    The scenes between husband and wife are done well and I like the music: Bergman is really playing the piano (not on the score but she learned the music so those are her hands).    Even my wife was charmed by the romance (and typically she has very strong feelings towards such a husband \ film,  but I didn't get the snake-eye while she watched this one!).

Of course maybe just that Bergman smile overwhelmed me that I'm overrating the film.   :D

I'm a Bergman fan too. She's why I watched this, all due respect to Howard. I like him well enough, but not enough to actively seek out his movies, although I've the majority of them by now. I haven't watched the original Swedish Intermezzo yet, but I'll get around to it eventually. My review of this one may have sounded a bit harsh. I'm not the biggest fan of romances, and this one seemed uneven. Parts worked, but there were moments when the usually reliable cast were rather awful. There's a scene on a boat where Howard mistakenly refers to a young girl by his own daughter's name, and when it's pointed out to him, his reaction and line delivery were just terribly phony. And as I mentioned in the original review, I felt the score was very intrusive and irritating, and repeatedly tried to elicit emotional responses in the listener that the drama couldn't manage. But that was the case in many studio era films as the use of film musical scoring was being learned and perfected.

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Phantom Thread (2017) - A most unusual romance, from Focus Features, Annapurna, and writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson. In early 1950's Britain, Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis) is the most sought-after dress designer among the rich and powerful. He lives a regimented, almost monastic life, with his watchful sister Cyril (Lesley Manville) as his close associate. One day Reynolds meets waitress Alma (Vicky Krieps) and takes her on as his muse, model, lover, whatever he needs. Alma learns that she's not the first to fill this position in Reynolds' life, but she becomes determined to be the last. Also featuring Camilla Rutherford, Gina McKee, Brian Gleeson, Harriet Sansom Harris, Lujza Richter, and Julia Davis.

I could care less about the fashion world or Haute Couture, and yet I still was drawn into the single-minded obsessive artistry of Reynolds' world, his strict discipline and pursuit of perfection within his chosen field. Alma acts as an audience surrogate, unsure of this odd world led by the often inscrutable Reynolds and Cyril, the latter of whom often has the charm of an asp. But as Alma begins to see the way things work in this cloistered, rarefied world, she begins to find ways to upset it and bend it to her advantage. Cyril is naturally distrusting of this latest distraction, but Reynolds seems to find something in this new, shaky lifestyle of uncertainty.

The performances are fantastic, with Day-Lewis once laying claim to the title of greatest actor of his generation. He complex, unique yet very real, without a single false note. Manville was also singled out for awards consideration, and she's scary, pitiful, powerful, and voice for order and tradition. Vicky Krieps, a native of Luxembourg, is subtle, sharp, and a match for Day-Lewis as the seemingly simple, unworldly Alma. I hope to see her in more.

The filmmaking is concise and largely unobtrusive, letting the characters do the work, often with silent looks and facial expressions. Director Anderson did not use a Director of Photography on this, instead working with the camera operators themselves. The result is spontaneous but not amateur looking, with a slight gritty haze that makes many scenes almost dream-like. It's not a look that I would like to see in a lot of films, but it works here among the chilly environments both exterior and interior. The score by Jonny Greenwood, guitarist and songwriter from Radiohead, is surprisingly subdued, mainly light piano pieces, with some flourishes when needed. 

I won't pretend that a lot of viewers will like this, as they find it slow, pretentious, boring, or pointless. I certainly did not, and found it a deep, and even deeply disturbing, look at a unique type of love fostered by unusual people, told in a compelling, if quiet, way. This is more for the Masterpiece Theatre crowd than the Fast and the Furious crowd. I would rank this among the very best of the year. Highly Recommended.   (9/10)

Source: Universal Blu-ray.

ntaniel-ntei-liouis-stin-athina-gia-tin-

I wasn’t surprised when Daniel Day-Lewis announced his retirement from acting.  He was being interviewed -- I think he was doing press for Gangs of New York -- and he said there’s not much one can learn from being on film sets, in response to why he takes long absences between projects.  And it was reported Leonardo DiCaprio kept asking him why he didn’t work more.  Of course, there’s the opinion that an artist must create.  But that’s simply too subjective.  Intellectual pursuit, and learning different things also qualify as art.  Having said this, I will miss Daniel Day-Lewis terribly.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Lion Has Wings (1939) - British pseudo-documentary propaganda from United Artists, producer Alexander Korda, and directors Michael Powell, Brian Desmond Hurst, & Adrian Brunel. After a short introduction on peacetime British life, the film gives a Cliff Notes breakdown on the lead-up to Great Britain's entry into WW2. Then there are two lengthy sections, one dealing with British RAF bombing runs over Germany, and the other detailing British defenses against German air raids. This is all interspersed with fictional vignettes meant to illustrate the effect on citizens' lives, with Ralph Richardson and Merle Oberon as the "typical English couple". Also featuring June Duprez, Robert Douglas, Anthony Bushell, Brian Worth, Bernard Miles, Torin Thatcher, and Flora Robson as Queen Elizabeth I.

This was hastily put together by Korda, with less than a month between the idea for the movie and it's release to cinemas. That speed shows in a jumbled, scattershot narrative, heavy on the patriotic rhetoric but light on any other aspect. The bits with Richardson and Oberon are the most useless, although their presence added to the movie's appeal at the time, I'm sure. Powell directed the bombing run section, and it seems like a trial run for his later One of Our Aircraft is Missing. The footage of Robson as Queen Elizabeth is lifted from Korda's Fire Over England.   (6/10)

Source: FilmStruck.

lionhaswings_areweatwar_FC_470x264_03102

Link to post
Share on other sites

Take away Casablanca from her film resume, and I wonder how familiar the general public would be with Ingrid Bergman today. She has a touch of immortality because of that one film. Otherwise, I suspect she would just be another name from the past, like a Norma Shearer or Greer Garson, or countless others.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Take away Casablanca from her film resume, and I wonder how familiar the general public would be with Ingrid Bergman today. She has a touch of immortality because of that one film. Otherwise, I suspect she would just be another name from the past, like a Norma Shearer or Greer Garson, or countless others.

One never knows what the general public knows as it relates to these studio-era movie stars.

For all we know Bergman is known more for Cactus Flower than Casablanca because Cactus Flower has Goldie Hawn and she is well known by many people in all the various age groups since her daughter is a big star and her son, a mid-level one,  as well as her long term relationship with Kurt Russell. 

But for me,  there will always be Paris.    

Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

One never knows what the general public knows as it relates to these studio-era movie stars.

For all we know Bergman is known more for Cactus Flower than Casablanca because Cactus Flower has Goldie Hawn and she is well known by many people in all the various age groups since her daughter is a big star and her son, a mid-level one,  as well as her long term relationship with Kurt Russell. 

But for me,  there will always be Paris.    

Casablanca is the most famous black and white film ever made, with images of Bogart from it available in the same kind of poster shops that have images of Monroe, Presley, Dean and Audrey Hepburn. Casablanca also gets some recognition as one of the best films ever made in some polls.

So I kinda doubt that Cactus Flower has a greater fame with the general public today, James. even with Goldie Hawn in it. Goldie Hawn? Her name still means something to the younger crowd today?

I realize you were just talking in generalities regarding the general public's knowledge about film. But my point is that Casablanca's fame is such that I make some assumptions about the lasting effects of its fame upon its cast members (certainly the top two stars) because of that.

I recall talking to a young (very intelligent) couple in their mid to late '20s. Their daughter was wearing a Minnie Mouse hat and I commented upon the irony of a Disney cartoon character being better known today than many (make that most) of the great Hollywood stars of the same era in which Minnie was created. And this is MINNIE MOUSE, remember, not even Mickey who, of course, remains a legend.

As an experiment I tested the waters of their old film knowledge by naming five stars from the '30s and '40s to see if they had heard of them. Garbo's name meant nothing to them (no surprise), nor did Cagney or Flynn (mentioning Robin Hood triggered nothing for them, except maybe a memory of Kevin Costner). The two names they knew that I named were Bogart and Bette Davis.

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Casablanca is the most famous black and white film ever made, with images of Bogart from it available in the same kind of poster shops that have images of Monroe, Presley, Dean and Audrey Hepburn.

 

Ah yes ... what mathematician can ever forget this classic scene?

11ge4QA.jpg

 

  • Like 4
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I realize you were just talking in generalities regarding the general public's knowledge about film. But my point is that Casablanca's fame is such that I make some assumptions about the lasting effects of its fame upon its cast members (certainly the top two stars) because of that.

I often use Casablanca when I'm 'testing' how much a family member or friend knows about studio-era films.     My informal survey results are that while most have heard of the film,  few have seen it and none of them could name any of the actors in the film,  even Bogie! 

Same with Gone with the Wind (and that one is in color,  which I mention because 80% of the people I know will NOT watch a b&w film,  ever). 

As for Bogie and Davis;  My living room is full of studio-era stars and those two are the ones that most people recognize.     But if asked to name a film they were in?;  dead silence. 

Like we have discussed along with Bogie and Davis, Wayne,  Monroe and Audrey Hepburn (due to the fashion industry), appear to be the most popular studio-era stars that the general public are aware of.   

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mr. Moto in Danger Island (1939) - 7th entry in the mystery series, from 20th Century Fox and director Herbert I. Leeds. Moto (Peter Lorre) travels to Puerto Rico, the dangerous island of the title, in order to root out a diamond smuggling ring. Also featuring Jean Hersholt, Warren Hymer, Douglass Dumbrille, Amanda Duff, Leon Ames, Richard Lane, Charles D. Brown, Paul Harvey, Robert Lowery, Ward Bond, and Willie Best.

Typical entry in the series. Warren Hymer as Moto's comic relief wrestler sidekick can get to be a bit much. This was originally written as a Charlie Chan movie. This was also the last in the series filmed, but the next to last released.  Enjoyable fluff.  (7/10)

Source: YouTube.

6807-mr-moto-in-danger-island-0-230-0-34

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...