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41 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Casablanca is the most famous black and white film ever made, with images of Bogart from it available in the same kind of poster shops that have images of Monroe, Presley, Dean and Audrey Hepburn. Casablanca also gets some recognition as one of the best films ever made in some polls.

So I kinda doubt that Cactus Flower has a greater fame with the general public today, James. even with Goldie Hawn in it. Goldie Hawn? Her name still means something to the younger crowd today?

I realize you were just talking in generalities regarding the general public's knowledge about film. But my point is that Casablanca's fame is such that I make some assumptions about the lasting effects of its fame upon its cast members (certainly the top two stars) because of that.

I recall talking to a young (very intelligent) couple in their mid to late '20s. Their daughter was wearing a Minnie Mouse hat and I commented upon the irony of a Disney cartoon character being better known today than many (make that most) of the great Hollywood stars of the same era in which Minnie was created. And this is MINNIE MOUSE, remember, not even Mickey who, of course, remains a legend.

As an experiment I tested the waters of their old film knowledge by naming five stars from the '30s and '40s to see if they had heard of them. Garbo's name meant nothing to them (no surprise), nor did Cagney or Flynn (mentioning Robin Hood triggered nothing for them, except maybe a memory of Kevin Costner). The two names they knew that I named were Bogart and Bette Davis.

Now that is SAD!!!!

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Some years back there was a contestant on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire who got a question something like, "The novel As Time Goes By tells the hypothetical story of what happened to Rick and Ilsa after the end of what classic movie?"

The contestant looked at the answers, said, "I know there was an Ilsa in The Sound of Music, so I'll say The Sound of Music, final answer."

Oops.

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4 minutes ago, Fedya said:

Some years back there was a contestant on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire who got a question something like, "The novel As Time Goes By tells the hypothetical story of what happened to Rick and Ilsa after the end of what classic movie?"

The contestant looked at the answers, said, "I know there was an Ilsa in The Sound of Music, so I'll say The Sound of Music, final answer."

Oops.

LMREO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

Take away Casablanca from her film resume, and I wonder how familiar the general public would be with Ingrid Bergman today. She has a touch of immortality because of that one film. Otherwise, I suspect she would just be another name from the past, like a Norma Shearer or Greer Garson, or countless others.

Well, she did win three Oscars..and not for Casablanca (a film that wouldn't make my top 100 favorite list..sorry)..since 'Gaslighting' is such a popular term now, she might be known for that..my favorite Bergman performance was in Notorious.. I don't care what 'the general public' likes or watches..just glad we can still see so many great films from the past..I honestly don't believe the 'comic book hero' all cgi and no script hits of today will stand the test of time as well.

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All in a Night's Work (1961);  Typical 60's rom-com, only made distinguishable by a good cast.  Dean Martin really goes out on a limb (eye roll) and portrays a playboy named Tony Ryder..am I crazy or are all 60's comedy playboy leads given names like that?  Or maybe Chad Stone? Anyway, Martin is the only relative of a wealthy publishing czar, so when his rich uncle dies in a Florida hotel he inherits the mega-million dollar business.  There's just one problem: hotel detective Jack Weston tells him that he saw a woman in a towel running from uncle's room..and she dropped a unique earring with a Chinese symbol on her way out.  The typical board--all old white guys who only want to keep their cu$hy jobs, are convinced the empire of 'family friendly' magazines would be hurt if such a scandal was uncovered, so they hire Weston to find the woman and offer her a nice sum for a nice NDA.  It turns out it's no coincidence that Shirley MacLaine (a researcher at the company) was in Florida too..in that hotel..and yes, in uncle's room.  MacLaine ended up in there while escaping the advances of another old wealthy fellow after she saved him from drowning, but has no idea she's the elusive mystery woman. When she sobs loudly at the funeral while wearing the same suspect earrings,  the board and Martin are convinced everything she does and says is to extract hush money from them..while she remains clueless to their attention.  Added to the mix are her conservative veterinarian fiancé, Cliff Robertson, and his judgmental mother Mabel Anderson and dad Charles Ruggles.  One of the better scenes is watching Ruggles and MacLaine get tipsy at a restaurant, singing and dancing..much to the chagrin of mother and son.  If you don't know how the movie is going to end, you haven't seen enough 60's rom-coms.  It's the formula of mistaken identity/misunderstandings, but even with a good cast, this one falls below the Doris/Rock offerings in the genre.  A nice little diversion, but nothing special.  source: terrarium   Image result for All in a Night's Work          

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1 hour ago, shutoo said:

All in a Night's Work (1961);  Typical 60's rom-com, only made distinguishable by a good cast. 

This film with Martin and MacLaine is vastly different from one the films they a few years before: Some Come Running and Career.

I haven't seen All in a Night's Work but it sounds like light entertainment that while not great,  doesn't make one fall asleep. 

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Mr. Moto Takes a Vacation (1939) - 8th and final entry in the mystery series, from 20th Century Fox and director Norman Foster. Moto (Peter Lorre) starts out in the North African desert, where the fabled crown of the Queen of Sheba is unearthed by archaeologists. Moto travels with the artifact first to Hawaii and then to San Francisco, where various parties try to steal it, including a legendary criminal mastermind known only as "Metaxa". Also featuring Joseph Schildkraut, Lionel Atwill, Virginia Field, John "Dusty" King, Iva Stewart, G.P. Huntley, Victor Varconi, and Willie Best.

This one is a bit over-stuffed with characters, and at times it seems a bit muddled, but it's still fun, and Lorre is a hoot. The identity of "Metaxa" isn't too difficult to figure out, but I liked seeing Moto get his own Moriarty.  (7/10)

Source: YouTube.

mr_moto_takes_a_vacation2.jpg

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11 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Mr. Moto Takes a Vacation (1939) - 8th and final entry in the mystery series, from 20th Century Fox and director Norman Foster. Moto (Peter Lorre) starts out in the North African desert, where the fabled crown of the Queen of Sheba is unearthed by archaeologists. Moto travels with the artifact first to Hawaii and then to San Francisco, where various parties try to steal it, including a legendary criminal mastermind known only as "Metaxa". Also featuring Joseph Schildkraut, Lionel Atwill, Virginia Field, John "Dusty" King, Iva Stewart, G.P. Huntley, Victor Varconi, and Willie Best.

This one is a bit over-stuffed with characters, and at times it seems a bit muddled, but it's still fun, and Lorre is a hoot. The identity of "Metaxa" isn't too difficult to figure out, but I liked seeing Moto get his own Moriarty.  (7/10)

Source: YouTube.

mr_moto_takes_a_vacation2.jpg

I believe those 8 Mr. Moto films are averaging around 7\10 which would be great for a series, possibly making this the best quality crime\murder serial in the studio-era.

(ok,  many would say the Thin Man series but since that includes a lot of comedy,   some might not consider it in the say category as Mr. Moto,  Boston Blac-k-i-e,  Lone Wolf,  Michael Shayne,  Charlie Chan, The Falcon, Crime Doctor, etc..).

Either way,  Mr. Moto rocked!   

 

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Moto travels with the artifact first to Hawaii and then to San Francisco, where various parties try to steal it, including a legendary criminal mastermind known only as "Metaxa".

Is it the stuff dreams are made of?

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New Frontier (1939) - Another B western adventure from Republic Pictures and director George Sherman. The Three Mesquiteers, Stony Brooke (John Wayne), Tucson Smith (Ray Corrigan), and Rusty Joslin (Raymond Hatton), try to help the residents of a small town who are about to be flooded out by the construction of a new dam. Also featuring Phyllis (Jennifer Jones) Isley in her debut, Eddy Waller, Sammy McKim, LeRoy Mason, Harrison Greene, Reginald Barlow, Burr Caruth, Dave O'Brien, and Cactus Mack as "Fake Indian".

This is pretty much the same as the other Mesquiteers movies, although i liked it a bit more. Jennifer Jones doesn't have much to do in her debut other than look worried. It was odd seeing Dave "Reefer Madness" O'Brien in another movie. I kept waiting for him to shout at people to play faster. This was the last of the 8 Three Mesquiteer films featuring Wayne.  (6/10)

Source: YouTube, a flawless HD copy, perhaps the clearest, sharpest movie I've ever watched on YouTube.

nuove-frontiere-la-locandina-del-film-28

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The Night Riders (1939) - More B western shenanigans from Republic Pictures and director George Sherman. The Three Mesquiteers (John Wayne, Ray Corrigan, and Max Terhune) try to help landowners who are being squeezed by a con-man (George Douglas) claiming to be Spanish royalty with rights to all of their land. The Mesquiteers are forced to don costumes to fight the bad guy's army of henchmen. Also featuring Doreen McKay, Ruth Rogers, Tom Tyler, Kermit Maynard, Sammy McKim, Walter Wills, Ethan Laidlaw, and Glenn Strange. 

The entry is unique in a few ways. The title, combined with the white hoods and cloaks that our heroes wear, unfortunately calls to mind the Ku Klux Klan, which I'm only 75% sure was not intended. The story is based on the same strange-but-true tale that inspired the later Baron of Arizona starring Vincent Price. And while most of the Mesquiteer movies that I've watched have been set in then-modern times, this one is set in 1881, since part of the story concerns President James Garfield's assassination. Despite all of this, the movie is still simple-minded, predictable, and a bit dull. (5/10)

Source: YouTube.

capas-tres-mascarados.jpg

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5 hours ago, Fedya said:

Some years back there was a contestant on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire who got a question something like, "The novel As Time Goes By tells the hypothetical story of what happened to Rick and Ilsa after the end of what classic movie?"

The contestant looked at the answers, said, "I know there was an Ilsa in The Sound of Music, so I'll say The Sound of Music, final answer."

Oops.

Although legendarily not the worst goof on Millionaire--For $500,000, and a shot at the final:

hqdefault.jpg

After using a 50-50, the contestant naturally chose A, final answer.

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image.jpeg.c9bbc67191dd8215116e8fad8e0d8d91.jpeg

Secret Beyond The Door (1948) A woman's gothic noir, Joan Bennett in a partial flashback recounts right before she makes her wedding vows exactly how she got into the situation she's in. The title card is very Daliesque, and so are the images that accompany the opening voice over narration (this is only the second noir I've seen where a woman does the voice over, the other being Claire Trevor in Raw Deal (1948)). There are numerous sequences with very stylistic images and others that also feel quite surreal. Bennett is a wealthy woman who inherited her fortune after the death of her brother.

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*note Chris Cross' "painting image" of Bennett from Lange's Scarlet Street (1945) on her brother's desk.

The story is about the architect (who's major income is derived from a magazine he publishes) that she meets and marries in Mexico. Arriving back at his upstate NY estate, she discovers that he is a widower and has a young son he never told her about. He lives in a mansion with a new wing he built that contains a sort of macabre museum of the actual rooms (yes he bought dismanteled them and reassembled them) where murders have taken place. It's some mania he has about how the room effects events in peoples lives. He also lives with his weird sister Anne Revere (Clara Mills in Fallen Angel), and a woman with a half burned face. There is one room however that he always keeps locked and she is determined to find the secret behind it.

The house will remind folks of gloomy Collinwood from Bennett's Dark Shadows years with it's locked off West wing, even the son of the architect is named David.

One more memory jog is provided by Natalie Schafer, Bennett's friend Edith Potter, doing her same priggish schtick she made iconically famous later on as Lovey Howell on Gilligan's Island. (PS she does that same schtick in another noir with Joan Crawford in Female on the Beach (1955)).

 

 

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in re: PETER LORRE and MR MOTO

You know those time wasting internet slideshows that you sometimes click on (usually on Zergnet) that promise things like "THESE ARE THE MOST HATED STARS IN HOLLYWOOD" or "15 STARS YOU TOTALLY DIDN'T KNOW WERE GAY."?

AUTHOR'S NOTE: Yeah, no. I knew 15 for 15, but whatevs.

I clicked on one yesterday that said "15 THINGS THAT WILL SURPRISE YOU ABOUT CLASSIC HOLLYWOOD STARS!"- and while I knew most of them, one slide claimed that Peter Lorre was a morphine addict who actually did the MR MOTO movies because they would let him shoot up in his trailer.

AUTHOR'S NOTE: Did they have trailers back then? i'm dubious.

anyhoo, it was just too on-the-nose not to share, whether it's true or not, i dunno...and even if it is, he was still a damn fine actor.

 

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Yes, Lorre was a drug addict for many years after getting hooked on morphine thanks to gallbladder pain dating back to before he came to the US. He also had awful teeth problems, probably exacerbated by his drug addiction, that caused him even more pain. Check out his teeth in any of his earliest movies, up through the Moto's, and you'll see they were in rough shape. He had them fixed (pulled and denture replacements) and got clean, but then he started gaining weight, leading to the chunky Lorre of later years.

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28 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Yes, Lorre was a drug addict for many years after getting hooked on morphine thanks to gallbladder pain dating back to before he came to the US. He also had awful teeth problems, probably exacerbated by his drug addiction, that caused him even more pain. Check out his teeth in any of his earliest movies, up through the Moto's, and you'll see they were in rough shape. He had them fixed (pulled and denture replacements) and got clean, but then he started gaining weight, leading to the chunky Lorre of later years.

interesting info thanks.

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Secret Beyond the Door has been shown on TCM, and the combination of Stanley Cortez' stunning cinematography, Fritz Lang's direction, and the general weirdness of the story makes for an unusual experience. I like it a lot, although Michael Redgrave isn't the best choice to play a romantic lead. He has a great scene toward the end where he imagines himself on trial.

In many ways, Secret Beyond the Door is like a mirror image of Scarlet Street and The Woman in the Window. Instead of being the femme fatale, Joan Bennett is the innocent this time.

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i mean, even in America, they used to give you morphine for a hangnail (one only wonders what Eastern European doctors of the 1930s would do) , so:

A. No blame on him

and

B. if anything, it makes me respect Lorre all the more for being able to reach deep down and bring out real emotions in his work while being paralyzed by such a strong addiction.

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Secret Beyond the Door isnt shown on TCM too often. I know it's considered the lowest of the Lang/Bennett collaborations, but I wish I had made a point to see it by now. :(. It marked the end of Joan's production company and bad feelings for all involved......

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2 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Secret Beyond the Door isnt shown on TCM too often. I know it's considered the lowest of the Lang/Bennett collaborations, but I wish I had made a point to see it by now. :(. It marked the end of Joan's production company and bad feelings for all involved......

Especially her agent, the one who got shot in the ... (you know)

ps- would love to see it too, but i have the feeling i'd be disappointed.

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3 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Secret Beyond the Door isnt shown on TCM too often. I know it's considered the lowest of the Lang/Bennett collaborations, but I wish I had made a point to see it by now. :(. It marked the end of Joan's production company and bad feelings for all involved......

And yet for some reason it's included in the 1001 Movies to See Before You Die book. I liked the movie well enough, but I don't think I'd have included it on that list.

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