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9 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

(Joan looks AMAZING in it tho, GOD I HOPE THEY LET HER KEEP THE WARDROBE!)

LOL. Maybe. Think her production company produced it.......

 

Needless to say, the company was dissolved after the film came out.........

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38 minutes ago, Hibi said:

LOL. Maybe. Think her production company produced it.......

Needless to say, the company was dissolved after the film came out.........

I THINK Joan was in one more disaster (w/ Robert Ryan?) before she rebounded with motherly roles in the (very good) THE UNGUARDED MOMENT and FATHER OF THE BRIDE.

eta: nope! checked on imdb, she did THE WOMAN ON THE BEACH right before SECRET BEYOND THE DOOR and it's about as bad.

It was also in the late-40's I think that she became a grandmother (her daughter, who she gave birth to at a young age, went and did her the favor of doing the same!)

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4 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I THINK Joan was in one more disaster (THE WOMAN ON PIER 13 w/ Robert Ryan?) before she rebounded with motherly roles in the (very good) THE UNGUARDED MOMENT and FATHER OF THE BRIDE.

It was also in the late-40's I think that she became a grandmother (her daughter, who she gave birth to at a young age, went and did her the favor of doing the same!)

Pier 13 is another Joan film I havent seen. Yes, she became a grandmother before she hit 40.

 

After checking, I think you mean Woman on the Beach. I have seen that one. Disappointing considering the director, but not bad.

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Just now, Hibi said:

Pier 13 is another Joan film I havent seen. Yes, she became a grandmother before she hit 40.

(i fudged up the facts in my post.)

 

damn, i would KILL my child (if i had one) were they to make me a grandparent before 40.

ps- not kidding.

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7 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I THINK Joan was in one more disaster (w/ Robert Ryan?) before she rebounded with motherly roles in the (very good) THE UNGUARDED MOMENT and FATHER OF THE BRIDE.

eta: nope! checked on imdb, she did THE WOMAN ON THE BEACH right before SECRET BEYOND THE DOOR and it's about as bad.

It was also in the late-40's I think that she became a grandmother (her daughter, who she gave birth to at a young age, went and did her the favor of doing the same!)

 

Yes, I have seen Woman on the Beach, but a long time ago. I dont remember it being awful, but not great either.

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59 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

IT'S REAL DAMN BAD.

it's one of those mystery/suspense movies that you stick around for just to see how they're going to have the unmitigated gall to end it, and when they do, it's the cinematic equivalent of a middle finger right in your face.

Here's what the 1001 Movies to See book has to say about it, in part:

"Secret Beyond the Door joins a special group of 1940s films, including Jean Renoir's Woman On the Beach (1947) and the Val Lewton production The Seventh Victim (1943), whose potent, dreamlike aura is virtually guaranteed by their B-movie sparseness and free-association plotting - as well as, here, voiceover narration that disorientatingly shifts from Bennett to Redgrave and back again. Heretical it may be for a card-carrying auteurist to suggest, but the cuts imposed by Universal on Lang's initial edit probably enhanced this dreamlike quality. The end result may be short on rational links and explanations, but Secret Beyond the Door is one of the precious occasions when Lang - aided immeasurably by Stanley Cortez's baroque cinematography and Mikos Rozsa's lush score - managed to add a richly poetic dimension to his familiar fatalism."

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Lawrence, that's actually a pretty good description and defense of Secret Beyond the Door. As fond as I am of the film, I wouldn't call it one of the movies you have to see before you die. If cinematography is the top criterion, however, it probably is.

Hollywood probably hoped that a distinguished stage actor, Michael Redgrave, would be another Laurence Olivier, both leading man (Secret Beyond the Door) and prestigious actor (Mourning Becomes Electra). The financial failure of those films must have ended that hope. The problem, to my mind, is that Redgrave lacks the sex appeal to play romantic leads. He's best cast in roles where that doesn't matter: Dead of Night; The Browning Version, where he's emotionally repressed and his wife is a heartless shrew; and The Quiet American, where he's a pompous journalist proud of his pro-Communist sympathies.

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35 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Lawrence, that's actually a pretty good description and defense of Secret Beyond the Door. As fond as I am of the film, I wouldn't call it one of the movies you have to see before you die. If cinematography is the top criterion, however, it probably is.

Hollywood probably hoped that a distinguished stage actor, Michael Redgrave, would be another Laurence Olivier, both leading man (Secret Beyond the Door) and prestigious actor (Mourning Becomes Electra). The financial failure of those films must have ended that hope. The problem, to my mind, is that Redgrave lacks the sex appeal to play romantic leads. He's best cast in roles where that doesn't matter: Dead of Night; The Browning Version, where he's emotionally repressed and his wife is a heartless shrew; and The Quiet American, where he's a pompous journalist proud of his pro-Communist sympathies.

Redgrave doesn't do much for me but I also thought he was a good light hearted lead in Hitchcock's The Lady Vanishes.

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believe it or not, from time to time i'm sorry that i'm not more moderate in my opinions, (i love hard, and i hate hard)

and since SECRET BEYOND THE DOOR...** is a film that people whom I like seem to like- and i like the people who made it- I want to go easy on it- but UGH, it was just SUCH a BAD MOVIE!

Never in a bazillion years would I have guessed Fritz Lang directed this. Jean Yarborough? Sure. But FRITZY?

I admit I watched the film off the internet on my 36(ish) inch TV screen, so there may have been distortion, but nothing about the composition of the shots (especially their framing) or the lighting was interesting to me. The sets in the beginning of the film were great, but after that were lackluster...there was nothing filmic about it that i found. it just struck me as astoundingly amateur, right down to the bargain-basement-imitation-Bronte REEK of it all.

it's a film where i would say that the actors were- more or less- not to blame in any way, the script was bad and the direction was bad.

 

 

**ACCORDING TO IMDB, THE ELLIPSES AT THE END ARE

AN OFFICIAL PART OF THE TITLE. I'M SORRY, BUT THAT MAKES

ME HATE THE FILM ALL THE MORE.

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I saw the Laurel and Hardy film Duck Soup. Once thought lost it was rediscovered and restored as best could be done. This short is basically the sane plot of their later short Another Fine Mess. L&H are vagrants hiding from being conscripted to fight a fire so they hide out in a mansion while the owner is away. They try to rent the house before the real owner shows up and chases them. It was a pretty funny short. I also saw **** for Tat. In this short L&H run a business next to someone from an earlier short who hates them. They get in a gigantic spat after the man accuses Hardy of a "clandestine affair with his wife." It was pretty funny and has a really good Stan Laurel line. "He who filters your good name steals trash!" :lol:

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2 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

I saw the Laurel and Hardy film Duck Soup. Once thought lost it was rediscovered and restored as best could be done. This short is basically the sane plot of their later short Another Fine Mess. L&H are vagrants hiding from being conscripted to fight a fire so they hide out in a mansion while the owner is away. They try to rent the house before the real owner shows up and chases them. It was a pretty funny short. I also saw **** for Tat. In this short L&H run a business next to someone from an earlier short who hates them. They get in a gigantic spat after the man accuses Hardy of a "clandestine affair with his wife." It was pretty funny and has a really good Stan Laurel line. "He who filters your good name steals trash!" :lol:

One of the highlights of Another Fine Mess for me is when Stan disguises himself as the maid and jokes around with Thelma Todd. There's a delightful spontaneity in their interplay. Stan really loosens up as "the maid," far more extroverted than in his usual slow thinking Laurel persona, and Todd looks like she's genuinely enjoying playing off him. This short is one of my favourite L & Hs.

1omH.gif

 

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4 hours ago, Hibi said:

 

Yes, I have seen Woman on the Beach, but a long time ago. I dont remember it being awful, but not great either.

It's also been a while since I saw it last.I kind of remember it as being ludicrously bad, but entertainingly so. For the life of me I want to say Jean Renoir directed it. I've got to be wrong about that though. Too lazy to IMDb now.

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3 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

It's also been a while since I saw it last.I kind of remember it as being ludicrously bad, but entertainingly so. For the life of me I want to say Jean Renoir directed it. I've got to be wrong about that though. Too lazy to IMDb now.

Or you could just read what I posted 4 hours ago on this thread where I said that it was Renoir. :mellow:

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12 hours ago, TomJH said:

One of my favourite Hardy moments occurs whenever he is about to chase someone (usually Stan). You see his face grimace but before he actually starts actually running after him there will be a two second stationary moment in which Oliver's legs pump up and down on the spot, almost like he's revving himself up to go.

It's a minor example of what cracks me up watching Hardy, in that they both had to develop their characters in silents, and he had to establish his big "elegant" moves of his comic character in pantomime first--
And even in sound, he still couldn't put something down on the table without that extra little "there!" gesture to let us know he did it, over-react "Ohh-hohh-hohh!" when he got hurt, or tell off Stanley or the antagonist without that little extra "So there!" nod at the end.  Even in The Music Box, as they're finally unpacking the player piano and playing it as they clean up, watch as he runs his delicate little fingers over the top as he walks to the other end.

It established Ollie's character as just doing everything large, because he thought he was a respectable man-about-town in doing it, and perfectly complemented the other half of the duo's lovable dimness.  :lol:

But Hardy, as pointed out by Eric, was also a surprisingly graceful dancer when the opportunity arrived, as well as a pleasant tenor.

And although the Way Out West clip of our duo dancing to the Gap Band has been ushered into the YouTube Hall of Fame for nearly a decade now, the two proved themselves to be versatile to a wide variety of music and dance styles:

 

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I read the entry you posted now- my eyes for some reason glanced over WOMAN ON THE BEACH. 

Mama is smoking a lot of weed to get through the Trump Era, man. 

 

Ps-  JEAN RENOIR directed that junk?!?! I like THE SOUTHERNER by him A LOT,  everything else, not so much. But still that really surprises me that he directed that movie. It baaaaaaaad. 

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20 hours ago, EricJ said:

The Broadway Melody (1929) - Not the '33, '36 or '40 one, since I'd found the disk at the library, was curious about its Oscar pedigree, and wanted to see the earliest talkie musical that was on classic disk.  

I enjoyed it, and really enjoy the Dogville spoof The Dogway Melody.  Apparently Warner Archive put out all the Dogville shorts in a set.

Also, in The Broadway Melody, watch for James Gleason in the opening scene (the one I think most clearly has a silent pedigree).

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Cat and Mouse (1974).

An excellent little remembered made-for-TV thriller featuring Kirk Douglas as a biology professor (nicknamed "Mousey," much to his resentment, because of his quiet and shy manner) who quits his job and goes looking for his former wife who has moved to Montreal with her son from a previous marriage. He wants the boy (whom he regards as his own) back but he has been blocked from doing so by a court order. Now, without work, without a family, obsessed with a son he has been told he can't go near, he decides to have his vengeance on his wife and the world - with a scalpel in his hand.

Douglas is a marvel as the professor, alternately pathetic and creepy, as he follows his wife (played by Jean Seberg) around the city. He is, in turn, being followed by a private eye, hired by his former's wife's fiancee (John Vernon) to be sure they know where he is. The cat and mouse games that Douglas will play will not only be with the wife but with that detective, as well. And along the way, meeting "Mousey" in a laundromat one night, a lonely young woman will make the mistake of taking this man home with her.

Shot in England as well as on location in Canada, Cat and Mouse effectively builds its suspense towards the inevitable clash. And then, at the climax, there is a twist I didn't see coming.

Film buffs will appreciate the presence in the film of Bessie Love (The Lost World, Broadway Melody) playing Vernon's mother. However, it's the bravura performance of Douglas that will remain in the memory.

91tfpLPyH7L._SL1500_.jpg

3 out of 4

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Contraband (1940) aka Blackout - British spy thriller from British National Films and director Michael Powell. Danish merchant ship's Captain Andersen (Conrad Veidt) is irritated enough when his ship is ordered into dock for inspection for contraband by British authorities. It only gets worse when two passengers, Mrs. Sorensen (Valeriea Hobson) and Mr. Pidgeon (Esmond Knight), sneak off the ship. Captain Andersen tracks them down through the darkness of London in an enforced blackout, only to end up targeted by a Nazi spy ring. Also featuring Hay Petrie, Joss Ambler, Raymond Lovell, Charles Victor, Phoebe Kershaw, Leo Genn, Peter Bull, Bernard Miles, Torin Thatcher, and Milo O'Shea.

There's a light-heartedness that runs through this entertaining thriller. Veidt, cast against type, is good as the put-upon ship's captain that just wants to get back home. Hobson is excellent as the mysterious Mrs. Sorensen. Some of the comic relief bits with Hay Petrie in a dual role can get a bit long, but it's not too awful. Contraband was the original British release title, which was changed to Blackout for the US market, as well as having 12 minutes shaved off the running time.   (7/10)

Source: I started out watching this on FilmStruck, but at the halfway mark the site started freezing up, as it often does for me during primetime hours. I ended up going to YouTube to finish the movie, with a vastly inferior quality print.

126.jpg

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The House of the Seven Gables (1940) - Gothic drama, loosely based on the novel by Nathaniel Hawthorne, from Universal Pictures and director Joe May. In mid-19th century New England, the Pyncheon family owns the title domicile. However, they are said to be cursed by a man whom an ancestral Pyncheon had wrongly put to death in order to take his land. Current head of household Gerald (Gilbert Emery) has lost most of the family fortune, much to the consternation of his sons Jaffrey (George Sanders) and Clifford (Vincent Price). When Gerald dies suddenly, Jaffrey accuses Clifford of his murder in order to take the house. Clifford is convicted and sent to prison, but Gerald's will leaves the house not to his sons but rather to cousin Hepzibah (Margaret Lindsay), who is in love with Clifford. As the years pass, Clifford plans vengeance on Jaffrey, the latter of whom has become a rich and powerful man. Also featuring Dick Foran, Nan Grey, Cecil Kellaway, Alan Napier, Miles Mander, Charles Trowbridge, and Harry Woods.

Made on a B budget, this ended up being a handsome, if far from faithful adaptation of Hawthorne's work. Lindsay and Price are both good, adjusting their characterizations from the earlier, younger scenes, to their later, beaten-down elder versions. Sanders is a heel, and few match his equal in such roles. This is often referred to as a horror movie, or least horror adjacent, but I don't see it, unless they were referring to Price's singing. The movie earned an Oscar nomination for Best Score (Frank Skinner).

Source: YouTube.

house-of-seven-gables-1.jpg

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So Evil My Love was even better the second time around. I had seen it a few years back, probably when Ray Milland was SOTM, but now it seems like one of the best movies of 1948. Despite the excellence of Milland and the supporting cast, the success of the film rests on Ann Todd's shoulders. She must be credible as a missionary's widow who seems respectable and extremely conventional, but who is willing to go against all the moral standards of her age, even willing to commit murder, yet with a conscience. Todd makes every twist and turn of the story seem plausible, even inevitable.

Ann Todd's screen persona can seem passive, even bland--some critics have spoken of her "glacial" beauty, and it's a good description--but there can be so much going on under the surface. Ray Milland knows exactly how to play a charming villain. Geraldine Fitzgerald as Todd's friend from school, Raymond Huntley as Fitzgerald's icy husband, and Leo G. Carroll as the private detective who's on to Milland and Todd are all in top form. Martita Hunt as Huntley's mother has so little screen time that she doesn't steal the movie, as she often does. It's great to see--and hear--the soft-spoken Raymond Huntley in a larger role than usual.

So who directed the film? Lewis Allen, an English director active in American and England in the 1940s and 1950s, then primarily in American television. The Uninvited is now out on Criterion, and I believe it is now being receiving its due as an excellent movie. Noir aficionados probably know Suddenly, a very effective thriller with Frank Sinatra in a villainous role. I haven't seen Desert Fury, but some of my friends really like it. The only other Allen movie I've seen is Another Time, Another Place, in which Lana Turner plays an American journalist who has an affair during WWII with an RAF pilot (the young Sean Connery). Perhaps it would be worthwhile to see more of Allen's films?

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8 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The House of the Seven Gables (1940)

house-of-seven-gables-1.jpg

I think that House of the Seven Gables represents the peak of Margaret Lindsay's career, with her most impressive performance. Both Sanders and Price indulge in a fair amount of (enjoyable) ham, to which Margaret's restrained portrayal is a refreshing contrast. Not long after this film, however, Lindsay would be cast in supporting roles.

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