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The Sea God (1930)

Early Paramount talkie set in the South Seas, about a pair of roughnecks (Richard Arlen and Robert Glecker), rivals in gambling, as well as for a woman, who both eventually get immersed in a competitive race for sunken pearls in the Solomon Islands. Glecker is the sneering boss of a collection of roughneck gofers who assist him, while Arlen's main companion is played by Eugene Pallette. Fay Wray is the girl caught between the two men.

This is a surprisingly entertaining little adventure, involving underseas diving off an island inhabited by cannibals. There must be something producers found appealing about casting Fay Wray as a lady in distress on a South Seas island. Both The Most Dangerous Game and King Kong would soon be around the film corner for her.

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Glecker is not a name that many will recognize but his face will ring a bell, I'm sure, for many old film buffs. There's not too much subtlety in his villainy, while Richard Arlen is serviceable as the leading man. Fay Wray is appealing, as usual, and gets to do a little screaming. Seeing her captured by cannibals will provide an instant flash forward to when she will be in a similar situation on Skull Island. Eugene Pallette is fun as "Square Deal," Arlen's friend, who becomes indignant any time he is accused by his pal of being fat, insisting, instead, he possesses athletic muscle.

A modest little film, its island scenes have a certain primitive appeal, further benefiting from the occasional nice photographic image.

tODFViB.png

I had never heard of The Sea God until coming across a video of it on rarefilmm.com. The two screen snapshots above are both from the print of the film available on the website.

2.5 out of 4

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Aerial Gunner (1943) - Low-budget war picture from Paramount Pictures and director William H. Pine. The story concerns airmen training to be tail gunners in bomber planes. Sgt. Foxy Pattis (Chester Morris) and Sgt. Jon Davis (Richard Arlen) have bad blood going back to before their military service, and things only get worse during the pressure of training. Can these two put their grudges aside in order to make the grade and become tail gunners? Also featuring Jimmy Lydon, Amelita Ward, Dick Purcell, Keith Richards, Billy Benedict, Kirk Alyn, Jeff Corey, John Hamilton, and Robert Mitchum.

This is corny and cliched, and the threadbare budget shows through quite often. The performances from Morris and Arlen are simply adequate, while young Jimmy Lydon gets to overdo it quite a bit as an emotionally-fragile recruit. I watched this for Mitchum, who has about 3 lines and shows up in one scene. This was one of 19 (!!!) movies that he appeared in 1943, his debut year in pictures.   (5/10)

Source: YouTube.

220px-Aerial_Gunner_poster.jpg

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Bar 20 (1943) - B western from United Artists and director Lesley Selander. Hopalong Cassidy (William Boyd), along with pals California (Andy Clyde) and Lin Bradley (George Reeves), sets out to buy some cattle for his titular ranch. The trio come across a stagecoach robbery and help a damsel in distress, Marie Stevens (Dustine Farnum). She takes the trio back to her ranch where they meet her fiancee Richard (Robert Mitchum) and friend Mark Jackson (Victor Jory). The bandits who robbed the stage seem to have a larger motive, and Hoppy and his pals may just become targets themselves. Also featuring Betty Blythe, Douglas Fowley, Francis McDonald, and Earle Hodgins.

This was the 48th of 66 Hopalong Cassidy pictures, and it's the first one I've seen. I may have seen bits of others when I was a kid, but this is the only one that I can definitively say that I've seen from start to finish. I watched it for Mitchum, here credited as "Bob Mitchum". His role is quite substantial compared to the others he played in his first year in movies, and he's not bad. This movie did offer the rare sight of seeing Superman sock Robert Mitchum in the jaw. Otherwise, this is the usual B western stuff, made slightly better by the cast. One other note: lead actress Dustine Farnum was the daughter of silent movie western star Dustin Farnum. She was all of 18 at the time, and this ended up being her sole movie credit.    (6/10)

Source: YouTube.

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bar-20-from-left-robert-mitchum-george-r

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I caught some of THE UNSUSPECTED (1947) the other day when it aired, but got called in to work.

then i found it on OnDemand and checked it out. Not sure if it was part of the MICHAEL CURTIZ SPOTLIGHT or not, but he directed it.

it's wonderfully shot with shadows and blind slits and fabulous Warner Bros. sets with sweeping staircases and pocket doors...everyone in it is RICH and does nothing but drink and smoke and wear dressing gowns and arrange gladiolas in the East Room.

the plot is best summed up as THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD meets SUDDEN FEAR!  (although they insist on cribbing obviously from LAURA too)- the use of a dictaphone as plot device is crucial (and even more ludicrous here- side note, CLAUDE RAINES has some MAD FAST record-editing skills.)

the dialogue was kinda MURDER SHE WROTE, but the stars SOLD IT. Raines was having fun, TED NORTH was very handsome, HURD HATFIELD was in this, but ALL HONORS GO TO AUDREY TOTTER.

I may as well say "AUDREY TOTTER and CLAUDE RAINES and a bunch of people who are not AUDREY TOTTER are in this film" because she is everything in it.

whenever you see AUDREY TOTTER in a movie, she is up to no ***damn good.

she plays the usual human/reptile hybrid from most of her films and she SLAYS in a variety of SLINKY BESEQUINED STUNNERS. She made every moment she was on screen hers.

i love AUDREY TOTTER.

If AUDREY TOTTER had starred in LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN, she would have been filing her nails while Darryl Hickman drowned, and then grabbed an oar and whacked him when he doesn't go down fast enough because the lake air is POSITIVELY FRIZZING her hair and she simply has other things to do today."

ss2443688_-_photograph_of_joan_caulfield

 

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I wonder why she wasnt a bigger star? She is good in everything I've seen her in. Maybe it was the post-war slump and studio pink slips that did her in like so many......

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53 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I caught some of THE UNSUSPECTED (1947) the other day when it aired, but got called in to work.

then i found it on OnDemand and checked it out. Not sure if it was part of the MICHAEL CURTIZ SPOTLIGHT or not, but he directed it.

it's wonderfully shot with shadows and blind slits and fabulous Warner Bros. sets with sweeping staircases and pocket doors...everyone in it is RICH and does nothing but drink and smoke and wear dressing gowns and arrange gladiolas in the East Room.

the plot is best summed up as THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD meets SUDDEN FEAR!  (although they insist on cribbing obviously from LAURA too)- the use of a dictaphone as plot device is crucial (and even more ludicrous here- side note, CLAUDE RAINES has some MAD FAST record-editing skills.)

the dialogue was kinda MURDER SHE WROTE, but the stars SOLD IT. Raines was having fun, TED NORTH was very handsome, HURD HATFIELD was in this, but ALL HONORS GO TO AUDREY TOTTER.

I may as well say "AUDREY TOTTER and CLAUDE RAINES and a bunch of people who are not AUDREY TOTTER are in this film" because she is everything in it.

whenever you see AUDREY TOTTER in a movie, she is up to no ***damn good.

she plays the usual human/reptile hybrid from most of her films and she SLAYS in a variety of SLINKY BESEQUINED STUNNERS. She made every moment she was on screen hers.

i love AUDREY TOTTER.

If AUDREY TOTTER had starred in LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN, she would have been filing her nails while Darryl Hickman drowned, and then grabbed an oar and whacked him when he doesn't go down fast enough because the lake air is POSITIVELY FRIZZING her hair and she simply has other things to do today."

ss2443688_-_photograph_of_joan_caulfield

 

What really intrigues me as a native New Yorker is New York City (circa 1947), and particularly it shows all my old neighborhoods and roads that I was familiar with as a kid 10 years later. LaGuardia Airport, The Gasometers (gasholders) just North of the Queensboro Bridge (BTW I don't believe there are any of these left in the entire USA. Queensboro Bridge at 59th Street Manhattan, my best friends brother ran a waterbed store on 59th Street just East of that the upper level approach bridge that the car in on in this shot below:

 Screenshot+%25282067%2529.png

We also see the Toll Booths on Henry Hudson Bridge, Henry Hudson Bridge over the Harlem River, 
Grand Central Terminal at 42nd Street, old style wooden N.Y. State parkway lights, Motorcycle cops on Vernon Blvd. along Queensbridge Park with 59th Street Bridge, The Hell Gate and Triboro Bridges. Being originally a native New Yorker when I first viewed the film I noticed something off, the image is reversed.

In the film it's this way:

Screenshot%2B%25282096%2529.png

The correct camera view is below. We are looking from Wards Island South across the East River towards the North end of Astoria Park where both the Hell Gate and Triboro Bridges cross the river. You can see a part of Manhattan skyline under the Triboro Bridge. Just out of the picture to the left would be Con Edison's Astoria Powerhouse and two large gasometers. I used to sit on the grass across the river in Astoria Park and watch the ship, tug boat and barge traffic going back and forth on the East River.

mirrored%2Bhell%2Bgate.jpg

 

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

whenever you see AUDREY TOTTER in a movie, she is up to no ***damn good.

Just looking at the noir films Totter was in (based on Film Noir (Ward \ Silver),  she played just as many 'good gals';

The High Wall  - good gal doctor

Lady in the Lake - yea, comes off as 'bad',  but this is an act and she ends up being the good girl and Marlowe's gal at that.

The Postman Always Rings Twice -  supporting and not much of a part

The Set-Up - good gal wife

Tension - oh, very naughty one here!

The Unsuspected - yea,  not a nice lady in this one

Just like Liz Scott and Gloria Grahame,  if one looks at their noir films they all played more good gal roles than femme fatales.     But since we tend to love bad-girls (and bad-boys),  those are the performances that are most memorable.     

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Behind the Rising Sun (1943) - Outrageous anti-Japanese propaganda film from RKO and director Edward Dmytryk. The story charts the last few years in the life of Japanese engineer Taro Seki (Tom Neal). who has just returned home after studying in America. He has a bit of culture shock as his nationalistic father (J. Carrol Naish) pushes his son to return to the Japanese ways. Taro falls in love with secretary Tama (Margo), but their relationship is put on hold when Taro is drafted and sent to war in China, where he witnesses all sorts of atrocities, changing him forever. Also featuring Donald Douglas, Gloria Holden, Robert Ryan, George Givot, Philip Ahn, Abner Biberman, Benson Fong, Richard Loo, and Mike Mazurki.

This was a lower budgeted B picture that ended up becoming RKO's biggest hit of the year. It features a lot of lurid and shocking scenes, like Chinese women being raped, children being thrown in the air and bayoneted (off screen, but talked about), fingernails being pulled out, and other acts of depravity. The majority of the Japanese characters are shown as unthinking robots in service of the emperor, although they aren't above random acts of cruelty, like slaps in the face. One memorable scene has American boxer Robert Ryan in a match against a Japanese wrestling champion played by Mike Mazurki. The latter's "wrestling" looks like bad karate and/or judo, but American audiences cheered when Ryan wins the day (not really a spoiler). In fact, this minor role really gave Ryan's career an early boost, even if he has a scene earlier in the movie where he advocates the shooting of cats if they make noise during a poker game, an act which he attempts.   (6/10)

Source: TCM.

BehindTheRisingSun2.jpg

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Just looking at the noir films Totter was in (based on Film Noir (Ward \ Silver),  she played just as many 'good gals';

The High Wall  - good gal doctor

Lady in the Lake - yea, comes off as 'bad',  but this is an act and she ends up being the good girl and Marlowe's gal at that.

The Postman Always Rings Twice -  supporting and not much of a part

The Set-Up - good gal wife

Tension - oh, very naughty one here!

The Unsuspected - yea,  not a nice lady in this one

Just like Liz Scott and Gloria Grahame,  if one looks at their noir films they all played more good gal roles than femme fatales.     But since we tend to love bad-girls (and bad-boys),  those are the performances that are most memorable.     

Yes, the bad girls are remembered more than the good ones........

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18 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Well, the Japanese did a lot of depraved acts during that time. (Look up Nanking) It's not all untruth. (though I realize it's Hollywood)........

Oh, I know. I've read plenty about it over the years, and seen more than a few movies on the subject. The most disturbing/hysterical one is probably Men Behind the Sun (1988), a Chinese movie on the topic that goes places few movies will, and one which contains scenes that viewers can't "un-see", if you know what I mean.

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39 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Well, the Japanese did a lot of depraved acts during that time. (Look up Nanking) It's not all untruth. (though I realize it's Hollywood)........

Yes, the Japanese invaded and occupied other nations under the guise of including them in the "Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere." :lol: Probably the most misleading name they could have come up with.

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5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I caught some of THE UNSUSPECTED (1947) the other day when it aired, but got called in to work.

then i found it on OnDemand and checked it out. Not sure if it was part of the MICHAEL CURTIZ SPOTLIGHT or not, but he directed it.

it's wonderfully shot with shadows and blind slits and fabulous Warner Bros. sets with sweeping staircases and pocket doors...everyone in it is RICH and does nothing but drink and smoke and wear dressing gowns and arrange gladiolas in the East Room.

the plot is best summed up as THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD meets SUDDEN FEAR!  (although they insist on cribbing obviously from LAURA too)- the use of a dictaphone as plot device is crucial (and even more ludicrous here- side note, CLAUDE RAINES has some MAD FAST record-editing skills.)

the dialogue was kinda MURDER SHE WROTE, but the stars SOLD IT. Raines was having fun, TED NORTH was very handsome, HURD HATFIELD was in this, but ALL HONORS GO TO AUDREY TOTTER.

I may as well say "AUDREY TOTTER and CLAUDE RAINES and a bunch of people who are not AUDREY TOTTER are in this film" because she is everything in it.

whenever you see AUDREY TOTTER in a movie, she is up to no ***damn good.

she plays the usual human/reptile hybrid from most of her films and she SLAYS in a variety of SLINKY BESEQUINED STUNNERS. She made every moment she was on screen hers.

i love AUDREY TOTTER.

If AUDREY TOTTER had starred in LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN, she would have been filing her nails while Darryl Hickman drowned, and then grabbed an oar and whacked him when he doesn't go down fast enough because the lake air is POSITIVELY FRIZZING her hair and she simply has other things to do today."

ss2443688_-_photograph_of_joan_caulfield

 

Great write up !!!

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death-in-small-doses-3.png
Come to papa Mink, bennie baby. I'm flying tonight, daddio. Don't give me the
slip, I'm hip, waiting for that cool mothership. Hey honey, you see my bongo
drums around?

 
Death In Small Doses (1957) Peter Graves, Mala Powers, Chuck Connors.
 
It's 1957 and a specter is haunting America, the specter of...DRUG ABUSE. This
time it's truckers hooked on amphetamines, bennies, happy pills, truckers' friend.
(Jack Webb did this better in his rapid fire style on the 1960s Dragnet). It's a serious
problem that calls for gov't investigation. Peter Graves, with his usual non-modulated
performance, plays the gov't agent who heads to LA to go undercover as a truck driver
to bust the bennie ring. He finds lodging at the house of a trucker's widow who rents rooms
to truckers between hauls. Mala Powers plays the widow, a gal with a nice pair of headlights
as a truck driving man might put it. It is there that Peter meets fellow truck driver Mink, played
by Chuck Connors. Mink is a hoot, a bennie gobbling guy who spouts endless hipster chatter.
Mink loves nothing better than to get in his benniemobile, head down to the local gin mill
and grove to some cool jazz. He's no square, daddio. Not exactly the usual image one has of
Connors. Without Mink the film would be a pretty pedestrian tale. Graves eventually discovers
who is peddling the bennies and to his sorrow Mala, who he was getting serious with, is involved.
Ouch. As the cops lead Mala away, the audience is relieved to know that the bennie ring has been
broken up and they can travel the highways and byways of the good ol' USA without having to
worry about hopped up bennie goblers out on the road. Not a bad little Allied Artists low-budget
flick with a few nice touches, but nothing very special. By far the best part is hipster Mink, who
elevates this thing slightly above the average.
 
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Bombardier (1943) - More military training propaganda from RKO and director Richard Wallace. Army Air Corps. Major Chick Davis (Pat O'Brien) and Captain Buck Oliver (Randolph Scott) have competing ideas about air bombing: Oliver prefers the old dive-bomber method, while David believes in the new, more technical bombardier air drop tactics. Davis' method is approved by the upper brass, so a school is established to train recruits. Oliver ends up under Davis' command, and the two butt heads while a varied group of green recruits struggle to pass the muster. Also featuring Eddie Albert, Robert Ryan, Anne Shirley, Walter Reed, Barton MacLane, Leonard Strong, Richard Martin, Russell Wade, John Miljan, Hugh Beaumont, Abner Biberman, Neil Hamilton, Margie Stewart, and Paul Fix.

The similarities between this and the independently produced Aerial Gunner, released that same year, are numerous. Two older men with a contentious past who end up in the same group; an emotionally-troubled recruit in the training program in an attempt to honor a deceased father; problems that force the plane down in hostile Japanese territory; etc. This movie has a much higher budget and is put together better, but the homogeneous nature of the story keeps this from being too memorable. The final act is very violent for the time. The movie earned an Oscar nomination for Best Special Effects.   (6/10)

Source: TCM.

 200px-Bombardier_movie.jpg

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Border Patrol (1943) - B western from United Artists and director Lesley Selander. Hopalong Cassidy (William Boyd) and his pals Christmas (Andy Clyde) and Johnny (Jay Kirby) are Texas Rangers investigating the murder of a Mexican man at supposedly abandoned silver mine. They discover that the mine is not only open and operational, but that Orestes Krebs (Russell Simpson) rules over the area, which he's declared a sovereign nation, and that he's using a small army of criminals to control the Mexican slave labor working the mine. Also featuring Claudia Drake, George Reeves, Duncan Renaldo, Pierce Lynden, and Robert Mitchum.

Standard B western heroics, generously borrowing from other films and stories (the villain Krebs is very similar to Judge Roy Bean from The Westerner), presented in a no-frills format. Mitchum has little to do as one of Krebs' many henchmen.   (5/10)

Source: YouTube.

7069174517_06e6f52a8f.jpg

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I saw a few Harold Lloyd films today. I saw the talkie Milky Way where Harold is mistaken for having beaten the world heavyweight champion and so is forced into the ring. He's tricked into staged fights and eventually fights is own brother in law. It was a decent film but definitely not as good as his best silent films. I also saw some of his early shorts like Spring Fever and Next Aisle Over.

 MV5BYzdjMWRmMDEtNTE4NC00YTdmLThhYTItZGI4

Harold's characters in these shorts surprised me because he's very mean and crude in them. His character is even about to run off from the main heroine until he realizes how much money she has. :lol: Definitely not the nice type of character he refined for The Freshman or Speedy.

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Cabin in the Sky (1943) - Excellent musical fantasy from MGM and director Vincente Minnelli. Little Joe (Eddie "Rochester" Anderson) is an inveterate gambler who is desperate to change his ways almost as much as his wife Petunia (Ethel Waters) wants him to. Little Joe has a run-in that leaves him on the brink of death, and the demonic Lucifer Jr. (Rex Ingram) can't wait to take his soul to Hell. However, an angel called The General (Kenneth Spencer) appears and gives Little Joe six more months of life in order to clean up his act. Little Joe tries to take the straight and narrow road, but temptress Georgia Brown (Lena Horne) may be his undoing. Also featuring John William Sublett, Louis Armstrong, Mantan Moreland, Willie Best, Butterfly McQueen, Oscar Polk, Bill Bailey, Juanita Moore, and Duke Ellington and His Orchestra.

Based on a stage production, this movie marked the first credited feature directing assignment for Minnelli, who does a terrific job. Some extra sensitive viewers may see this movie as pandering to outdated stereotypes, but I think it avoids that trap, despite the broad nature of the characters. The cast is a fantastic assemblage of many of the best black performers of the day, and Waters, Anderson, Ingram and Horne are all tremendous. The petty bickering among the angels & demons is a trope continued to this day in fantasy storytelling. I'm not generally a musical fan, but I liked this one. It received an Oscar nomination for Best Song ("Happiness Is a Thing Called Joe").   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

2128942293_59d7bcb18c_z.jpg?zz=1

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17 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Cabin in the Sky (1943) - Excellent musical fantasy from MGM and director Vincente Minnelli. Little Joe (Eddie "Rochester" Anderson) is an inveterate gambler who is desperate to change his ways almost as much as his wife Petunia (Ethel Waters) wants him to. Little Joe has a run-in that leaves him on the brink of death, and the demonic Lucifer Jr. (Rex Ingram) can't wait to take his soul to Hell. However, an angel called The General (Kenneth Spencer) appears and gives Little Joe six more months of life in order to clean up his act. Little Joe tries to take the straight and narrow road, but temptress Georgia Brown (Lena Horne) may be his undoing. Also featuring John William Sublett, Louis Armstrong, Mantan Moreland, Willie Best, Butterfly McQueen, Oscar Polk, Bill Bailey, Juanita Moore, and Duke Ellington and His Orchestra.

Based on a stage production, this movie marked the first credited feature directing assignment for Minnelli, who does a terrific job. Some extra sensitive viewers may see this movie as pandering to outdated stereotypes, but I think it avoids that trap, despite the broad nature of the characters. The cast is a fantastic assemblage of many of the best black performers of the day, and Waters, Anderson, Ingram and Horne are all tremendous. The petty bickering among the angels & demons is a trope continued to this day in fantasy storytelling. I'm not generally a musical fan, but I liked this one. It received an Oscar nomination for Best Song ("Happiness Is a Thing Called Joe").   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

2128942293_59d7bcb18c_z.jpg?zz=1

Very fine film with most of the best African-American talent available at the time.   The only thing missing is a 16 year old Sidney Poitier.   :D

(well Nat King Cole and his trio doing a musical number would have been welcome). 

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Corvette K-225 (1943) - More wartime action-at-sea, from Universal Pictures, producer Howard Hawks, and director Richard Rosson. The story follows the adventures of the crew of the title ship, the smallest class of naval battleship, this one operating out of Canada and escorting merchant vessels across the dangerous North Atlantic. Captain MacClain (Randolph Scott) tries to keep his men rallied and ready, although young officer Lt. Cartwright (James Brown) is having confidence issues. Also featuring Ella Raines, Barry Fitzgerald, Noah Beery Jr., Andy Devine, Fuzzy Knight, Richard Lane, Thomas Gomez, David Bruce, Walter Sande, Frank Faylen, Peter Lawford, Charles McGraw, Cliff Robertson, Milburn Stone, Ian Wolfe, and Robert Mitchum.

There's little to distinguish this from most of the other naval-based war pictures of the day. You have the usual assortment of characters among the crew, with the square-jawed captain leading the day. The movie has several notable actors very early in their career, such as Lawford, McGraw, Robertson, and Mitchum, here playing one of the many lower-ranked sailors. The most memorable scene in this is when a group of officers are learning battle plans back at HQ. They are all seated around a long dining table which is covered in a map. The man in charge is seated in an elevated chair above the table, and sailors slowly move the chair along the length of the table as the chief is pointing out tactics. The movie earned an Oscar nomination for Best B&W Cinematography, which is I can't comment on due to the poor quality of the print I watched. As with most movies produced by Hawks, he's rumored to have actually directed much of this himself.   (6/10)

Source: YouTube.

00corvettek225tc2_large.jpg?v=1487457829

107656415.png

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They might not have appeared in Cabin in the Sky but here is a clip of the remarkable Nicholas Brothers doing "Jumpin' Jive" accompanied by Cab Calloway and his orchestra in Stormy Weather. It just doesn't get any better than this, folks.

 

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2 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Very fine film with most of the best African-American talent available at the time.   The only thing missing is a 16 year old Sidney Poitier.   :D

And Dooley "Casablanca" Wilson, who played Anderson's role on stage.

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Cigarjoe, thanks for the information about the New York locations on film. This is one of the added pleasures of older films.

For shots of Hong Kong circa 1959, there's The World of Suzie Wong, a much better film than I expected. Geoffrey Unsworth's cinematography is outstanding, whether he's filming a cloudy day in Hong Kong or merely studio sets. Early in the film Unsworth uses a blue-forward palette that still gives value to other colors, unlike the overfiltered junk that's much too common in films and television shows today. Richard Quine gives us a number of camera shots that glide as entrancingly as Nancy Kwan.

Well, almost as entrancingly. One imdb reviewer describes Nancy Kwan as "beautiful beyond words," and I can only agree. Does she look more stunning in scarlet or lavender, or is the white gown she wears toward the end of the movie the most remarkable of all? OK, it's not realistic that a lady of the evening would have clothes like these, but this is a romantic drama, and I'm not going to complain.

Nancy Kwan can act, too, and she has excellent chemistry with William Holden. Although this isn't one of Holden's greatest performances, he is always interesting on screen, and I always want to know how he's going to react, which is one of the marks of the best film actors. The supporting cast is strong, too, with Sylvia Syms just right as Kay, the proper young Englishwoman who falls for Holden. We wouldn't mind if Holden ends up with her, should Suzie Wong come to a tragic end, and we wouldn't be crushed if Kay is left alone at the end. This is a difficult balance to maintain. I also particularly liked Jacqui Chan as Suzie's glasses-wearing friend Gwennie Lee; she's a cutie pie. (No, Jacqui Chan didn't eventually become Jackie Chan; the dates don't work out.)

I thought the matter of Anglo-American racism toward the Chinese was handled well. Kay's father, a banker, deflects the cruder kind of comment about racial superiority, but he also lets Holden know that he will shunned by the community should he actually marry a girl like Suzie. The film is sympathetic toward girls who at a very early age have no real option other than prostitution if they want to survive. The realistic elements of the story help provide a good foundation for the high romantic drama.

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1 hour ago, kingrat said:

Well, almost as entrancingly. One imdb reviewer describes Nancy Kwan as "beautiful beyond words," and I can only agree. Does she look more stunning in scarlet or lavender, or is the white gown she wears toward the end of the movie the most remarkable of all?

Who could disagree with this ... for Heaven's Sake.

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5 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Corvette K-225 (1943) - More wartime action-at-sea, from Universal Pictures, producer Howard Hawks, and director Richard Rosson. The story follows the adventures of the crew of the title ship, the smallest class of naval battleship, this one operating out of Canada and escorting merchant vessels across the dangerous North Atlantic. Captain MacClain (Randolph Scott) tries to keep his men rallied and ready, although young officer Lt. Cartwright (James Brown) is having confidence issues. Also featuring Ella Raines, Barry Fitzgerald, Noah Beery Jr., Andy Devine, Fuzzy Knight, Richard Lane, Thomas Gomez, David Bruce, Walter Sande, Frank Faylen, Peter Lawford, Charles McGraw, Cliff Robertson, Milburn Stone, Ian Wolfe, and Robert Mitchum.

There's little to distinguish this from most of the other naval-based war pictures of the day. You have the usual assortment of characters among the crew, with the square-jawed captain leading the day. The movie has several notable actors very early in their career, such as Lawford, McGraw, Robertson, and Mitchum, here playing one of the many lower-ranked sailors. The most memorable scene in this is when a group of officers are learning battle plans back at HQ. They are all seated around a long dining table which is covered in a map. The man in charge is seated in an elevated chair above the table, and sailors slowly move the chair along the length of the table as the chief is pointing out tactics. The movie earned an Oscar nomination for Best B&W Cinematography, which is I can't comment on due to the poor quality of the print I watched. As with most movies produced by Hawks, he's rumored to have actually directed much of this himself.   (6/10)

Source: YouTube.

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As u of all know during Hollywoods Golden age/Studio-System-(l925-60 & 63) It's glorious ":Dream Factories" much preferred directors that shot like an essembly line-(gotten from Henry ford)  The epitome being *V. Fleming, W.S. Van Dyke, II, *Curtiz,etc But Hawks was the sole hold out & could handle each and every film genre from the likes of "Scarface: Shame of a Nation" "Twentieth Century"-(brilliant), "Bringing Up Baby" "His Girl Friday" "Sergent York"-(his sole nomination too? So much so it's legendary that winner *Ford for *"How Green Was My Valley" thought "York" & Howard truly deserved to win instead!), ), "Air Force, "To Have and Have Not" "The Big Sleep" (l946), "Red River" "I Was a Male War Bride" "Monkey Businesss" '52), "Rio Bravo" "Hatari" "El Dorado" & much more.

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