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3 hours ago, spence said:

As u of all know during Hollywoods Golden age/Studio-System-(l925-60 & 63) It's glorious ":Dream Factories" much preferred directors that shot like an essembly line-(gotten from Henry ford)  The epitome being *V. Fleming, W.S. Van Dyke, II, *Curtiz,etc But Hawks was the sole hold out & could handle each and every film genre from the likes of "Scarface: Shame of a Nation" "Twentieth Century"-(brilliant), "Bringing Up Baby" "His Girl Friday" "Sergent York"-(his sole nomination too? So much so it's legendary that winner *Ford for *"How Green Was My Valley" thought "York" & Howard truly deserved to win instead!), ), "Air Force, "To Have and Have Not" "The Big Sleep" (l946), "Red River" "I Was a Male War Bride" "Monkey Businesss" '52), "Rio Bravo" "Hatari" "El Dorado" & much more.

I never heard that Ford thought his own How Green Was My Valley was not as good as Hawks' Sergeant York. I've never been much of a fan of the sentimental Ford film and much prefer the Hawks film myself.

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Crash Dive (1943) - More naval war action, this time with submarines and in Technicolor, from 20th Century Fox and director Archie Mayo. Tyrone Power stars as Lt. Ward Stewart, a PT boat officer who is ordered to join the crew of a submarine under the command of Lt. Cmdr. Dewey Connors (Dana Andrews). The two become rivals for the affection of school teacher Jean (Anne Baxter), but the wartime deployment may render their competition moot. Also featuring James Gleason, May Whitty, Ben Carter, Harry Morgan, Frank Conroy, and Charley Grapewin.

The well-executed action scenes are a highlight, but much of the film is taken up with a rather uninspired romantic triangle. I found the "B" storyline, centered on aging crew member Gleason secretly suffering heart trouble and his unlikely friendship with black sailor Carter, to be much more compelling. The movie won the Oscar for Best Special Effects. This would be the last film for Power for three years, as he left for Marine Corps basic training the moment filming had completed.   (6/10)

Source: Fox Movie Channel.

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Crime Doctor (1943) - Film adaptation of a popular radio series, from Columbia Pictures and director Michael Gordon. When a man is found on the side of the road, seriously injured, he's taken to a hospital, where he later recovers but also has amnesia, with no recollection of his life before the hospital or even what his name is. He adopts the name of Robert Ordway (Warner Baxter), and with the help of older physician Dr. Carey (Ray Collins), he sets out to discover who he really is. This process eventually leads him to enter medical school, which he graduates with honors, eventually becoming a noted psychiatrist. It's at this point that figures from his past start to emerge, and Dr. Ordway will learn that he may not like the answers that he's been seeking. Also featuring Margaret Lindsay, John Litel, Harold Huber, Leon Ames, Don Costello, Betty Blythe, Dorothy Tree, Adele Mara, and Addison Richards.

This was the first in a series of ten films, all of which starred Warner Baxter. He was in his mid-50's at this point and suffering ill health, but he's not too bad here, if a bit too old. Ray Collins, who plays his mentor, was the same age, and had also been the star of the radio version. John Litel, a solid character actor usually seen in authoritarian roles, is good as the chief heavy.   (6/10)

Source: TCM.

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The Dark Tower (1943) - British thriller from Warner Brothers and director John Harlow. A two-bit circus run by Phil Danton (Ben Lyon) is about to fold due to lack of money when mysterious stranger Stephen Torg (Herbert Lom) shows up looking for a job. He demonstrates a skill with hypnotism, and they hit on the idea of having Torg hypnotize star attraction, acrobat Mary (Anne Crawford), so that she'll do even more dangerous stunts in a hypnotic state. This proves very successful, but Mary's husband Tom (David Farrar) doesn't appreciate the way Torg looks at his wife. Also featuring Frederick Burtwell, William Hartnell, Josephine Wilson, Elsie Wagstaffe, J.H. Roberts, and Aubrey Mallalieu.

This sub-par tale of jealousy and murder is hampered by unfunny comic relief and a ludicrous plot turn. The only real draw is a terrific performance by Herbert Lom, in his first substantial role. He comes across as a deeper-voiced Peter Lorre, disconcerting and menacing simply through his expressions. Former star of American silent films Ben Lyon is forgettable, and the finale is silly beyond belief.   (5/10)

Source: TCM.

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8 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

The Dark Tower (1943) - British thriller from Warner Brothers and director John Harlow.

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A Dark Tower and a cowboy?--You could make a great hit movie out of that!  :lol:

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Desert Victory (1943) - British war documentary from the Ministry of Information and director Roy Boulting. The film charts the North African desert campaign by the British and Allied forces against the German and Italian Axis powers. General Bernard Montgomery leads the Allied forces in fierce ground combat against the German tactical genius Erwin Rommel. Narration by J.L. Hodson.

If any of this footage looks familiar, it's been used and re-used in countless war films and TV documentaries, particularly in History Channel WW2 shows. There was some complaints at the time of release of that the movie downplays US involvement, but that didn't stop the movie from winning the Best Documentary Feature Oscar.  (7/10)

Source: YouTube.

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Dark City (1998) Existentialist Noir from The Twilight Zone
 
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Beware of Greeks bearing imaginative movies.

Director Alex Proyas along with two other writers Lem Dobbs and David S. Goyer have created a brilliant metaphorical Neo Noir Film about being, life, and essentially an ultimate Noirsville. The film is a high point in the art of studio/stagecraft.


A gorgeous film to look at.

Dark City stars Rufus Sewell (The Illusionist (2006)) as John Murdoch, William Hurt (Body Heat(1981), I Love You to Death (1990)) as Inspector Frank Bumstead, Kiefer Sutherland (Fallen Angels  TV Series (1993–1995), Melancholia (2011)) as Dr. Daniel P. Schreber, Jennifer Connelly (Once Upon a Time in America (1984), The Hot Spot (1990), Mulholland Falls(1996), Requiem for a Dream (2000)) as Emma Murdoch/Anna, Richard O'Brien (The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975), Flash Gordon (1980)) as Mr. Hand, Ian Richardson (Brazil (1985), From Hell (2001)), as Mr. Book, Bruce Spence as Mr. Wall, Colin Friels as Det. Eddie Walenski, John Bluthal (The Fifth Element (1997), ) as Karl Harris, Melissa George (The Limey (1999), Mulholland Drive (2001)) as May, Ritchie Singer as Hotel Manager / Vendor, Nicholas Bell as Mr. Rain and Satya Gumbert and Noah Gumbert as Mr. Sleep.

The cinematography was by Dariusz Wolski, Romeo Is Bleeding (1993), The soundtrack was by Trevor Jones (Angel Heart (1987), The Last Of The Mohicans (1992) and the Film Editing was by Dov Hoenig (The Last of the Mohicans (1992)).

The majority of the film was shot at Fox Studios Australia, and I must stress again how intricate, amazing, and believable the world that they created is. It hearkens back to the worlds created in the original Hollywood Studio Noirs but it goes light years beyond 90% of them in detail. The originals were basically low budget affairs and what they achieved was through the ingenuity and creativity of their studios and personnel. Here you have that creativity married to a substantial budget. They built fifty-five some odd different sets and shot on them in eighty days. Some work was also done in Los Angeles, California.

The Noir World they created with Dark City, is an amalgamation archetypes from every noir era and bits and pieces of every iconic noir city ever filmed. There's steam vapors arising from the manholes, subways, an Automat, New York City Bishop Crook streetlamps, London Underground signs, rotary telephones, checker cabs, seamed stockings, elevated trains, 40's through to 70s autos, The Los Angeles Globe on concrete post streetlights, Art Deco skyscrapers, suspension bridges, pull shades on windows, fire escapes, cage door elevators with operators, venetian blinds, moving billboards, neon, cobblestone streets with their peeling asphalt veneers,  etc., etc.,

Dark City was produced by New Line Cinema in conjunction with Mystery Clock Cinema.

The theatrical release had the opening voice over. The director's cut  released in 2008, preserved Proyas's original artistic vision for the film. The version I watched was the theatrical release DVD

Dark City is a Noir Lovers wet dream, 10/10.  Full review with some screencaps here in Film Noir/Gangster pages.

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Du Barry Was a Lady (1943) - Technicolor musical comedy from MGM and director Roy Del Ruth. Nightclub coatroom attendant Louis Blore (Red Skelton) has eyes for star attraction singer-dancer May Daly (Lucille Ball). But Louis isn't the only one in love with May, as dancer Alec Howe (Gene Kelly) also pines for her. When Louis wins a fortune in a sweepstakes, he thinks he may finally get his gal. Also featuring Virginia O'Brien, Zero Mostel in his movie debut, Douglass Dumbrille, Donald Meek, George Givot, Rags Ragland, Louise Beavers, Kay Aldridge, Hugh Beaumont, Ava Gardner, Marilyn Maxwell, Lana Turner, and Tommy Dorsey and His Orchestra. 

I'm sure this goofy diversion was appreciated during the height of the war years. It's colorful, occasionally humorous, and features plenty of beautiful gals. The musical numbers are decent, especially the Dorsey band numbers. I've never been a big Red Skelton fan, and would have liked this more with Bob Hope in the lead. Lucy hadn't moved into her comedy phase yet, although moments peek through in her performance. She's mainly here to be lovely eye candy, and she is, and this was the first time that her hair was dyed her signature bright red color. I was very impressed with Virginia O'Brien and her deadpan song delivery. Her bored demeanor was both funny and sexy.    (6/10)

Source: Warner DVD, with a few vintage shorts as extras.

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3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Du Barry Was a Lady (1943) - Technicolor musical comedy from MGM and director Roy Del Ruth. Nightclub coatroom attendant Louis Blore (Red Skelton) has eyes for star attraction singer-dancer May Daly (Lucille Ball). But Louis isn't the only one in love with May, as dancer Alec Howe (Gene Kelly) also pines for her. When Louis wins a fortune in a sweepstakes, he thinks he may finally get his gal. Also featuring Virginia O'Brien, Zero Mostel in his movie debut, Douglass Dumbrille, Donald Meek, George Givot, Rags Ragland, Louise Beavers, Kay Aldridge, Hugh Beaumont, Ava Gardner, Marilyn Maxwell, Lana Turner, and Tommy Dorsey and His Orchestra. 

I'm sure this goofy diversion was appreciated during the height of the war years. It's colorful, occasionally humorous, and features plenty of beautiful gals. The musical numbers are decent, especially the Dorsey band numbers. I've never been a big Red Skelton fan, and would have liked this more with Bob Hope in the lead. Lucy hadn't moved into her comedy phase yet, although moments peek through in her performance. She's mainly here to be lovely eye candy, and she is, and this was the first time that her hair was dyed her signature bright red color. I was very impressed with Virginia O'Brien and her deadpan song delivery. Her bored demeanor was both funny and sexy.    (6/10)

Source: Warner DVD, with a few vintage shorts as extras.

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I haven't watched this movie for years, but I remember liking it.  Though, I've always found Virginia O'Brien's deadpan shtick annoying.  I always internally groan when I see her name in the credits of a film I'm watching, because I know she'll probably sing something.  The ending number of this film, "Friendship," was later performed again by Lucille Ball and Vivian Vance on an episode of I Love Lucy, "Lucy and Ethel Buy the Same Dress." 

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Edge of Darkness (1943) - Wartime action thriller from Warner Brothers and director Lewis Milestone. The film depicts an uprising by the citizenry of a small Norwegian fishing village against the occupying Nazi forces. Gunnar (Errol Flynn) and Karen (Ann Sheridan) help to organize the simple folk of the area against the brutal Nazi soldiers led by Captain Koenig (Helmut Dantine). Also featuring Walter Huston, Judith Anderson, Nancy Coleman, Ruth Gordon, John Beal, Morris Carnovsky, Roman Bohnen, Henry Brandon, Virginia Christine, Dorothy Tree, and Charles Dingle.

There was a popular sub-genre of war picture during the war years that centered on common European folk rising up against Nazi occupiers. This is one of the best that I've seen, although the propaganda nature of the storytelling keeps it from being truly great. Another minor weakness lies in Flynn's character, a rather bland cipher with little to distinguish him. Flynn apparently felt the same himself and tried to get out of the movie, but in the end it turned out to be a quality picture on his resume. Sheridan is good, if a bit too made up for a Norwegian villager in her situation. I also liked Coleman as a Polish gal at the end of her rope, and Judith Anderson as a rather severe woman whose secretly in love with one of the occupying soldiers. The movie's explosive climax seems light years away from director Milestone's work 13 years previously on what is arguably the greatest anti-war film, All Quiet On the Western Front.    (7/10)

Source: TCM.

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The Falcon Strikes Back (1943) - Murder mystery from RKO Pictures and director Edward Dmytryk. Tom Lawrence (Tom Conway), aka The Falcon, gets framed for a war bonds robbery and a murder, so he sets out to find the real culprits with the help of sidekick Goldie (Cliff Edwards) and reporter Marcia Brooks (Jane Randolph). Also featuring Harriet Nelson, Edgar Kennedy, Rita Corday, Erford Gage, Wynne Gibson, Andre Charlot, Cliff Clark, Edward Gargan, Frank Faylen, Byron Foulger, Jean Brooks, Margie Stewart, and Richard Loo.

This is a fairly entertaining chapter in the series, with a varied group of suspects, and some interesting actors in the mix, like Edgar Kennedy and Wynne Gibson.   (6/10)

Source: TCM.

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Edge of Darkness (1943) -

 

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One of the most unusual aspects of a WW2 propaganda film like Edge of Darkness is the inclusion in the story of a sympathetic German soldier (the one who connects with Judith Anderson). I can't think of another film at the time that had such a characterization.

One of the reasons that Flynn's performance may be subdued (he's part of an ensemble cast; this is not a Flynn star vehicle) is that he was on trial for statutory rape while the film was being made. Flynn later wrote that he had a plane and pilot ready to make an escape from the U.S. if he was found guilty. He also called the trial the dividing point of his life.

Years later Ann Sheridan had an anecdote about the making of this film. She said that Flynn was great fun to work with and he would come back to the film set in the afternoon after having been to court in the morning, and bring everyone up to date on the latest. Sheridan used to call Flynn "Old Dad." She said that when he reported that one of the girls testified that he did it with her while wearing his boots, he responded to Sheridan, words to the effect, "Good grief, old girl, next thing they'll be saying I was wearing a top hat."

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8 minutes ago, TomJH said:

One of the most unusual aspects of a WW2 propaganda film like Edge of Darkness is the inclusion in the story of a sympathetic German soldier (the one who connects with Judith Anderson). I can't think of another film at the time that had such a characterization.

49th Parallel had a German soldier who wanted to stay behind with the Hutterites and go back to baking bread (his job in Germany before he was drafted into the war).  He gets shot for desertion.

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5 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Du Barry Was a Lady (1943) -

Also featuring Virginia O'Brien, Zero Mostel in his movie debut,

Interesting, to say the least, to see a young pre-Blacklist Zero Mostel being pitched by MGM as the Next Phil Silvers.

I don't think I'd ever seen him in anything outside of the post-Blacklist late-60's, as Max Bialystock, Pseudolus, or Tevye (on the cast album).

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Lawrence, I'm glad you liked Edge of Darkness. I'm fascinated by the genre of Resistance films, especially the ones made during WWII or shortly thereafter, and this is one of the best. Good story and strong supporting cast.

I saw The Late George Apley (1947), based on a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by John P. Marquand, which had subsequently been a hit play starring Leo G. Carroll. This was one of the early films directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz, with cinematography by Joseph La Shelle. Although the film is almost all dialogue, it also has effective shot selection and camera movement.

The year is 1912, and the setting is a mansion on Beacon Hill in Boston. George Apley is so bound by tradition that he's shocked when his daughter wants to marry a Yale man and even more shocked when his son wants to marry a girl of Irish ancestry (shudder) who lives in Worcester, MA (even bigger shudder). But there's joy in his life: he may become president of the bird watchers' society, based in part on his having spotted a yellow-bellied sapsucker in November.

To call George Apley a hidebound reactionary might be understating matters. Fortunately for the audience, he's played by Ronald Colman, an actor of almost unlimited charm. (This was the year Colman won the Oscar for A Double Life, playing a very different kind of character.) Apley must come to terms with a changing world in which he has less power and in which he may wish to use his power in different ways than he has formerly. He has some help from his sympathetic wife (Edna Best) and gets challenged by his spunky daughter (Peggy Cummins) and even by the plain and timid young cousin (Vanessa Brown) he wants to marry his son (Richard Ney). His sister Amelia (delightfully played by Mildred Natwick) is even more hidebound than he is; we sympathize with her husband (Percy Waram in a terrific performance) who finds little ways to rebel against her. Apley also has another cousin (Richard Haydn) who can be counted on as a reliable toady.

The Late George Apley doesn't hit on any hot-button topics of today, and I can understand some people not caring for it. For those who find themselves interested in the characters and a bygone way of life, it's a rewarding film, very well made.

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The Falcon in Danger (1943) - Lesser entry in the mystery series from RKO and director William Clemens. Tom Lawrence (Tom Conway), aka The Falcon, gets involved in a case of kidnapped industrialists and stolen money. Also featuring Amelita Ward, Jean Brooks, Elaine Shepard, Cliff Clark, Edward Gargan, Clarence Kolb, Felix Basch, Richard Davies, Richard Martin, Erford Gage, Eddie Dunn, and Ian Wolfe.

There's some amusing interplay between Conway and Ward as his Texan girlfriend, but there's not much else to distinguish this routine time-waster. There's also a Great Dane, if you're into that sort of thing.   (6/10)

Source: TCM.

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The Seventh Seal (1957) At the beginning of Olivier's Hamlet the voiceover intones simplistically "This is the story of a man who couldn't make up his mind." (Not Shakespeare as I guess you already know). In this one though, one might say, "This is the story of a man who wanted to know God." Many characters---in real life and movies---could be said to want this but I like the way the film rubs our face in it. And it does so without being morbid. If one thinks it is, the remedy is keeping the mind on how it good the film is.

The man in question is Antinous Block (Max Von Sydow), a knight, who has a little monologue in a church:

"Must it be so cruelly inconceivable to know God through one's senses? Why must He hide in half-spoken promises and unseen promises? ... What will become of us who want to believe but cannot? ... Why can I not kill this God within me? [as he] must ... live inside me in this painful, humiliating way?

It is evident that he is not just a pious soul who passively prays for salvation, rather              clear that he is possessed by an existential angst in our modern sense and brought on all the more by seeming inevitability as he is returning with his Squire ((Gunnard Bjornstrand) from a decade of being exposed to the agony and death of the Crusades ("all for the Glory of God" jokes the Squire, who sees the whole matter as nonsense) and now straight into the agonies and horrors of the Black Death, a plague so severe that it is said to have wiped out a third of Europe. The date for the Black Death is traditionally given as 1348 (though it probably lasted more than a single year) and the Crusades were over by then, betraying the story as an anachronism, a discrepancy that is totally forgiven. An extra on the disc features a short interview with Bergman wherein he says that it was his own fear of death that prompted the film and that the idea of the chess game was inspired by a painting by Albertus Pictor (1440-1507), who is portrayed in the film by Gunnar Olssen, in a brief  (and amusing) scene.

The opener shows Antinous with chess pieces set up on a board perched on a rock on a beach. The incongruity of that pales to the incongruity of the vision of Death personified (Bengt Ekerot) who is looking on (a cinematic icon). Antinous realizes that his time has come but boldly gains a reprieve by challenging Death to a game.with freedom as a reward. Why, chess is a game I am quite skillful at, says Death, which might serve as one of our greatest understatements. Death always wins. The game is adjourned from to time to allow Antinous to tend to an "urgent matter" in case he should lose. At one point Antinious trys to catch the Grim Reaper off guard for a revelation. Death is after on the fence with presumably a glimpse at both sides, he should certainly know something ... shouldn't he?

There is a small itinerant theatrical group. One of the players, Jof (Nils Poppe), spots a woman and child walking in the woods. He jumps in their little wagon and tells his wife (Bibi Andersson) that he has just seen the Holy Mother and Blessed Child. She laughs it off as just another of his "stories of devils and angels."  But later on Jof sees Death playing chess where others think that Antinous is playing by myself. And in another instance, Jof envisions an event that we, the audience, have good reason to believe is true but this time his wife is right there and sees nothing.

Bergman weaves together both the drama and the (much need) comic. On the supporting end, an actor Ake Fridell's face is wonderfully expressive as a workaday fellow who seeks his wandering wife (Inga Gill) who is, in turn, wonderfully saucy. The story of the witch is considerably less amusing. Even the Squire is moved, which effectively counters earlier moments of flippancy. He understands after all.  There are some unpleasantness but how could there not be with a looming Reaper (as well as some harsh realities of the Middle Ages) omnipresent to keep it all honest.

*****

out of five

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Falcon and the Co-eds (1943) - Amusing entry in the mystery series from RKO and director William Clemens. Tom Lawrence (Tom Conway), aka The Falcon, is asked to look into the mysterious death of a teacher at a private girls school. Was it a natural death, or murder? And if the latter, was it one of the faculty or one of the students? Also featuring Jean Brooks, Rita Corday, Amelita Ward, Isabel Jewell, George Givot, Cliff Clark, Edward Gargan, Barbara Brown, Ian Wolfe, and Dorothy Malone.

With one of the students claiming to have psychic visions involving murder and teachers harboring illicit secrets, there's enough going on in this entry to hold one's attention. Conway seems to be enjoying himself surrounded by a predominantly female cast.   (6/10)

Source: TCM.

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17 hours ago, EricJ said:

Interesting, to say the least, to see a young pre-Blacklist Zero Mostel being pitched by MGM as the Next Phil Silvers.

I don't think I'd ever seen him in anything outside of the post-Blacklist late-60's, as Max Bialystock, Pseudolus, or Tevye (on the cast album).

Eric, you might check out Panic in the Streets to see Zero Mostel in a dramatic role. He's very good. Kazan deliberately cast an actress Mostel didn't like as his wife to increase the tension between the characters.

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11 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Eric, you might check out Panic in the Streets to see Zero Mostel in a dramatic role. He's very good. Kazan deliberately cast an actress Mostel didn't like as his wife to increase the tension between the characters.

And don't forget Mostel's strong performance as a scared would-be hood in THE ENFORCER (1951), (an uncredited) Raoul Walsh-directed Murder Inc. crime drama, with Bogart and one of my favourite Ted De Corsia performances.

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

And don't forget Mostel's strong performance as a scared would-be hood in THE ENFORCER (1951), (an uncredited) Raoul Walsh-directed Murder Inc. crime drama, with Bogart and one of my favourite Ted De Corsia performances.

And, of course, Disney's Chip & Dale "Rescue Rangers" foe Fat Cat, whose voice and design was patterned after a 60's Zero Mostel parody, right down to the balding cowlicks:  :lol:

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The Fallen Sparrow (1943) - Flim noir/mystery/wartime spy movie from RKO and director Richard Wallace. John McKittrick (John Garfield) has just arrived back in town after a lengthy stay at a country sanitarium to deal with his PTSD, an after effect of being a tortured P.O.W. in the Spanish Civil War. John is investigating the death of his best friend, and the trail leads to an assortment of characters with secret motives. Also featuring Maureen O'Hara, Walter Slezak, Martha O'Driscoll, Patricia Morison, Hugh Beaumont, Bruce Edwards, John Miljan, John Banner, and Nestor Paiva.

Garfield is terrific as the mentally unsteady McKittrick, determined to avenge his friend but walking a tightrope of emotional turmoil. It's a very nuanced performance, and much more naturalistic than many of his peers of the day. O'Hara is gorgeous as a woman of mysterious motives. I didn't even recognize Leave It to Beaver dad Hugh Beaumont until halfway through the film, as he's using a European accent and is naturally much younger. The cinematography is very good, with much of the film taking place at night and in nightclubs and darkened rooms. The movie earned an Oscar nomination for Best Score.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

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False Colors (1943) - Overly familiar B western from United Artists and director George Archainbaud. Hopalong Cassidy (William Boyd), along with pals California (Andy Clyde) and Jimmy Rogers (Jimmy Rogers), have just completed their cattle drive for the season. Another cowpoke named Bud Lawton (Tom Seidel) receives a letter telling him that his father has died and that he's inherited his large ranch. Not long after, Bud is killed and replaced by a lookalike in the employ of crooked businessman Foster (Douglass Dumbrille) in an effort to steal the ranch's water rights. Hoppy and the gang try to help Bud's sister Faith (Claudia Drake) keep control of the ranch and the water. Also featuring Roy Barcroft, Glenn Strange, Pierce Lyden, Sam Flint, and Robert Mitchum as Rip Austin.

The plot is pretty ridiculous, as there are many ways to tell that the false brother is an impostor, but instead characters seem to seek out the more implausible courses of action in order to pad the running time. As with the other Cassidy westerns, I watched this for Mitchum, who has little to do as one of the minor heavies, even if he has a fun character name. Jimmy Rogers, who plays new sidekick Jimmy Rogers, is a son of Will Rogers.   (5/10)

Source: YouTube.

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Hoppy checks to see if a sleepy Robert Mitchum has had a shave.

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