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The Breaking Point (1950) - Compact, emotional, gritty, and sensitive, this film is apparently more faithful to Hemingway's original conception of To Have and Have Not.  One of Garfield's finest performances, and I'd rate it among Michael Curtiz's top five.  The ending is powerful and haunting.  It's hard to believe this little masterpiece came from the same man who directed Casablanca and The Adventures of Robin Hood.  I also ended up catching The Proud Rebel and Young Man with a Horn.  It's as if Curtiz learned how to work within a more intimate landscape in his later years.  These are the films that are true classics of the director's later years, not the over-rated White Christmas  which is just a technicolor rehash of Holiday Inn.

 

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SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS (1937)

It's been a long time since I've seen this one, so decided to watch it again, which prompted me to challenge myself to go back and watch/re-watch every animated and live action Disney movie in chronological order (by release year). I might start a thread for this extensive challenge, who knows. 

Image result for snow white and the seven dwarfs

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53 minutes ago, rosebette said:

The Breaking Point (1950) - Compact, emotional, gritty, and sensitive, this film is apparently more faithful to Hemingway's original conception of To Have and Have Not.  One of Garfield's finest performances, and I'd rate it among Michael Curtiz's top five.  The ending is powerful and haunting.  It's hard to believe this little masterpiece came from the same man who directed Casablanca and The Adventures of Robin Hood.  I also ended up catching The Proud Rebel and Young Man with a Horn.  It's as if Curtiz learned how to work within a more intimate landscape in his later years.  These are the films that are true classics of the director's later years, not the over-rated White Christmas  which is just a technicolor rehash of Holiday Inn.

 

Wonderful film. I wrote about here a few months back. I think I gave it a 4/4. Fave Garfield.

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Hitler's Madman (1943) - WW2 resistance drama from MGM and director Douglas Sirk. In the occupied Czech city of Lidice, Karel (Alan Curtis), a native son who has been trained by the British, sneaks back into town to organize a resistance movement against the Nazis. Reinhardt Heydrich (John Carradine), the highest ranking Nazi official in Czechoslovakia, becomes their prime target. Also featuring Patricia Morison, Ralph Morgan, Howard Freeman, Edgar Kennedy, Ludwig Stossel, Al Shean, Elizabeth Russell, Jimmy Conlin, Peter van Eyck, Natalie Draper, Tully Marshall, Blanche Yurka, and Ava Gardner.

Based on the same true story as Fritz Lang's Hangmen Also Die from this same year, this is powerful stuff, if produced on the cheap. Alan Curtis is an awful actor and the weakest aspect of the film. Carradine, with a distracting putty nose, is good as the detestable Heydrich. Edgar Kennedy is amusing as a drunken slob who lives in a cave. This was independently produced and set to be released by poverty row outfit PRC, but when Louis B. Mayer saw it, he was impressed enough to buy it and have it released as an MGM film.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

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4 minutes ago, laffite said:

Wonderful film. I wrote about here a few months back. I think I gave it a 4/4. Fave Garfield.

The Breaking Point is indeed a wonderful film.    Great acting by Garfield.    I really like his acting in the being-drunk scene.   It is these type of scenes where Garfield shines; so natural - he comes off as someone that is drunk without coming off as someone ACTING like they are drunk.

 

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31 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Hitler's Madman (1943) -

82219-hitler-s-madman-0-230-0-345-crop.j

Patricia Morison turned 102 last month. Among other things she is, I believe, the only actor still living that appeared in any of the Johnny Weissmuller Tarzan films or the Sherlock Holmes series, with Basil Rathbone. And I suspect that that statement also applies to the cast of Hitler's Madman, as well.

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1 hour ago, rosebette said:

The Breaking Point (1950) - Compact, emotional, gritty, and sensitive, this film is apparently more faithful to Hemingway's original conception of To Have and Have Not.  One of Garfield's finest performances, and I'd rate it among Michael Curtiz's top five.  The ending is powerful and haunting.  It's hard to believe this little masterpiece came from the same man who directed Casablanca and The Adventures of Robin Hood.  I also ended up catching The Proud Rebel and Young Man with a Horn.  It's as if Curtiz learned how to work within a more intimate landscape in his later years.  These are the films that are true classics of the director's later years, not the over-rated White Christmas  which is just a technicolor rehash of Holiday Inn.

 

Curtiz is one of my favourite directors, the master of the large scale epic, film noirs, and high powered melodramas. But I found a sensitivity in some of his later work, in particular The Breaking Point and The Proud Rebel, that made them most affecting as small intimate human dramas.

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1 hour ago, NickAndNora34 said:

SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS (1937)

It's been a long time since I've seen this one, so decided to watch it again, which prompted me to challenge myself to go back and watch/re-watch every animated and live action Disney movie in chronological order (by release year). I might start a thread for this extensive challenge, who knows. 

 

That is quite a challenge you've set for yourself.  

I've seen Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs multiple times, and I'll admit that it's probably my least favorite of the "Disney Princess" films.  Snow White with her Betty Boop voice is so irritating.  Her prince isn't cute, he looks like he's wearing lipstick.  My favorite part of this movie is the Evil Queen/Witch.  I wish the Witch however, would have poisoned Snow White the right way and put her out of her misery. 

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27 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

That is quite a challenge you've set for yourself.  

I've seen Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs multiple times, and I'll admit that it's probably my least favorite of the "Disney Princess" films.  Snow White with her Betty Boop voice is so irritating.  Her prince isn't cute, he looks like he's wearing lipstick.  My favorite part of this movie is the Evil Queen/Witch.  I wish the Witch however, would have poisoned Snow White the right way and put her out of her misery. 

I guess it's because I've changed over the years that my tastes in the dwarfs has changed, too. When I was a kid the one I most liked was the child-like Dopey, but now the one I most seem to identify with is someone else.

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Hoppy Serves a Writ (1943) - B western from United Artists and director George Archainbaud. Hopalong Cassidy (William Boyd), along with pals California (Andy Clyde) and Johnny (Jay Kirby), are Texas lawmen after bandits who keep slipping across the border into Oklahoma to avoid arrest. Hoppy is forced to go undercover to catch his quarry. Also featuring Victor Jory, George Reeves, Jan Christy, Hal Taliaferro, Roy Barcroft, Forbes Murray, Byron Foulger, and Robert Mitchum.

This was the first of the Hopalong Cassidy films to feature Robert Mitchum, here playing an unshaven minor bad guy. This was only his second speaking role in films, but he received enough fan mail that Boyd kept Mitchum around as part of the repertory company for several more entries in the series. Otherwise, the only memorable thing about this movie is the dopey title.   (5/10)

Source: YouTube.

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

That is quite a challenge you've set for yourself.  

I've seen Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs multiple times, and I'll admit that it's probably my least favorite of the "Disney Princess" films.  Snow White with her Betty Boop voice is so irritating.  Her prince isn't cute, he looks like he's wearing lipstick.  My favorite part of this movie is the Evil Queen/Witch.  I wish the Witch however, would have poisoned Snow White the right way and put her out of her misery. 

She isn't my favorite either. I like her because she was the first ever Disney animated full length feature film, and I appreciate all the history that surrounds the making of this movie. However, I think I mainly enjoy the dwarfs and the forest animals. Most of the film is filler, too.

I also agree with you about the Prince. He looks highly effeminate. Not that there's anything wrong with that; I'm just sure that in 1937 Walt and his team weren't necessarily going for that. 

Another thing I noticed: if the Evil Queen had truly wanted Snow White dead, why didn't she just stab her to thoroughly do the trick? Why did she choose a potion in which there's a loophole? 

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

Curtiz is one of my favourite directors, the master of the large scale epic, film noirs, and high powered melodramas. But I found a sensitivity in some of his later work, in particular The Breaking Point and The Proud Rebel, that made them most affecting as small intimate human dramas.

Phyllis Thaxter was nicely cast as an "average housewife" type, but she had a prettiness to her and it was charmingly obvious when she had her hair done to imitate Patricia Neal's more glamorous image. In the "small intimate human" department, the admonishment to the young daughter was an effective domestic touch, something that would infuse more and more films in the 50's. Garfield's performance was more temperate that some of the earlier wild-eyed and angry personas (to my mind at least though subtle) and comes off as having matured a little from that, as an actor and in this particular role. Just a solid, damn good film.

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41 minutes ago, laffite said:

Phyllis Thaxter was nicely cast as an "average housewife" type, but she had a prettiness to her and it was charmingly obvious when she had her hair done to imitate Patricia Neal's more glamorous image. In the "small intimate human" department, the admonishment to the young daughter was an effective domestic touch, something that would infuse more and more films in the 50's. Garfield's performance was more temperate that some of the earlier wild-eyed and angry personas (to my mind at least though subtle) and comes off as having matured a little from that, as an actor and in this particular role. Just a solid, damn good film.

SPOILER ALERT: Arguably Phyllis Thaxter's strongest scene in The Breaking Point is her last scene, when she is pleading with her husband to agree to having an operation that will forever change him. Garfield is in the foreground, as he lies in a bunk, but the scene belongs to her with the camera fully on her face, capturing all of her emotion. It says much about John Garfield's selflessness as an actor that he "gave" this scene to his co-star, this being Garfield's final scene in the film, as well.

But Garfield is also allowed to further explore his character's vulnerability here, as well, a war hero and tough guy now telling his wife how much he will physically/emotionally need her in the future.

I completely agree that this film (as well as Force of Evil made two years before) show that as an actor Garfield was clearly maturing as a performer. Who knows what potentially memorable performance in the future we have all been denied because of the politics at the time and the tragedy that lay just ahead for the actor.

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How to Operate Behind Enemy Lines aka Undercover (1943) - Military training film from the US Government Office of Strategic Services and director John Ford. The film details the various aspects of undercover espionage work in hostile foreign lands, with emphasis on attention to detail and minutia that often trips up less diligent operatives. Local tunes to be hummed or whistled, the proper haircut, the way one ties knots or prepares food or even disposes of trash can all be giveaways as to their true identity. A mix of stock footage and original, fictionalized material is used, featuring Peter Lorre, Osa Massen, Tom Quinn, Cyril Ring, Victor Varconi, Pierre Watkin, and even Ford himself.

This is pretty dry material, and much of it is about as exciting as old instructional films one watched in school. However, it's occasionally interesting in its presentation. One memorable bit details why agents shouldn't use prostitutes or frequent brothels, since those kinds of ladies will always talk to the other side. Seeing John Ford in an acting role was also amusing, and he demonstrates why he was better off behind the camera.   (6/10)

Source: TCM.

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4 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS (1937)

It's been a long time since I've seen this one, so decided to watch it again, which prompted me to challenge myself to go back and watch/re-watch every animated and live action Disney movie in chronological order (by release year). I might start a thread for this extensive challenge, who knows. 

Not a bad idea, at that.  There are a few lesser-known in-between movies folks haven't seen.

And if it helps, by the time you get into the War years, Disney Movie Club--which has been playing Warner Archive and offering rare MOD titles of all the back catalog Blu titles they're afraid to sell on retail--recently Blu-uptweaked that double-feature disk of Saludos Amigos and The Three Caballeros.  (Walt & El Grupo documentary sold separately...Eh, it doesn't tell you much anyway.)

Darn, I read the title and thought we were in for some of the usual grownup-feminist issue-laden Disney-bashing "deconstruction" mistakes ("Snow is a male fantasy, who cleans total strangers' houses because she loves domesticity, and throws away her life sitting around to wait for strange princes to come and find her wherever she is!"), or the newly awakened discovery from actually watching the movie at close range, busting most of the pop myths, and seeing how good it was all along.  Oh, well, maybe by the time we get to Cinderella.  ?

Another thing I noticed: if the Evil Queen had truly wanted Snow White dead, why didn't she just stab her to thoroughly do the trick? Why did she choose a potion in which there's a loophole? 

"She'll be buried ALIVE!"  Oh yeah...She knows what she's doing.

Some young fans do still inquire about the Queen's motivations, though:

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

How to Operate Behind Enemy Lines aka Undercover (1943) - Military training film from the US Government Office of Strategic Services and director John Ford.

The one I really like is Resisting Enemy Interrogation.

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In Old Oklahoma aka War of the Wildcats (1943) - A-list western from Republic Pictures and director Albert S. Rogell. John Wayne stars as cowboy and ex-soldier Dan Somers, who meets up with romantic school teacher Catherine Allen (Martha Scott) and wealthy oil baron Jim Gardner (Albert Dekker). Dan soon finds himself a rival of Gardner's, both for the affections of Catherine and in the oil business. Also featuring George "Gabby" Hayes, Marjorie Rambeau, Grant Withers, Byron Foulger, Paul Fix, Dale Evans, Cecil Cunningham, Roy Barcroft, Yakima Canutt, Rhonda Fleming, Edward Gargan, Harry Shannon, Robert Warwick, and Sidney Blackmer as Teddy Roosevelt.

Republic spent a lot of money on this one, and it has A-movie production values. The cast are all good, with stand-out performances from Wayne, who has really settled into his screen persona at this point without being too overbearing, and Marjorie Rambeau as a saloon/brothel owner. This film also offers the rare chance to hear both Gabby Hayes and John Wayne sing. Perhaps that's why it earned an Oscar nomination for Best Sound, as well as for Best Score (Walter Scharf).   (6/10)

Source: YouTube.

warofwildcatsRhs.jpg

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7 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS (1937)

It's been a long time since I've seen this one, so decided to watch it again, which prompted me to challenge myself to go back and watch/re-watch every animated and live action Disney movie in chronological order (by release year). I might start a thread for this extensive challenge, who knows. 

Image result for snow white and the seven dwarfs

That scene in the forest is one of the most frightening ever.  I took my kids to see it when they were between 4 and 7 (I had 3 less than 2 years apart) because I had such fond memories, and that scene scared the bejesus out of them.  I also enjoy the parody of "Whistle While You Work" in Enchanted with Amy Adams.

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28 minutes ago, rosebette said:

That scene in the forest is one of the most frightening ever.  I took my kids to see it when they were between 4 and 7 (I had 3 less than 2 years apart) because I had such fond memories, and that scene scared the bejesus out of them.  I also enjoy the parody of "Whistle While You Work" in Enchanted with Amy Adams.

Right? I'm still slightly terrified of that scene. It's quite scary for its time. The "Happy Working Song" from Enchanted is quite catchy, and I enjoy it also :) 

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The Iron Major (1943) - Derivative war-hero/sports biopic from RKO and director Ray Enright. Pat O'Brien stars as Frank Cavanaugh, first a champ football player, later a highly-respected college football coach. He puts his career on hold to join the Army during WW1, where he exhibits valor. He returns home to coach more football, despite failing health. The End. Also featuring Ruth Warrick, Robert Ryan, Leon Ames, Russell Wade, Bruce Edwards, Richard Martin, Barbara Hale, Myron Healey, Louis Jean Heydt, Sam McDaniel, John Miljan, Marie Windsor, Joseph Crehan, and Kirk Alyn.

Combining elements of Knute Rockne All American and Sergeant York, this terrible propaganda misfire fails to capture anything of those previous films qualities. O'Brien comes across as too old (in the early scenes), bored, or just uninspired. For a film about a major figure in football history, there are no decent football scenes. Instead there's a lot of stock footage briefly glimpsed and endless montages of newspaper headlines blaring out another Cavanaugh victory. The film also fails to adequately illustrate what made his coaching so unique or praiseworthy, except for yet another newspaper headline declaring his invention of the "diving tackle". I watched this for Robert Ryan. He plays a football-playing student who later becomes a priest.   (4/10)

Source: TCM.

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Death In Small Doses (1957) Speed Freak Noir

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A late night trucker is hauling freight down a stretch of two lane blacktop. He's popping "bennies", "co-pilots", "speed", "zip", "uppers", i.e., Benzedrine pills, the first pharmaceutical drug that contained amphetamine.

Bennies had a euphoric stimulant effect, and it was widely used for recreational purposes. Benzedrine and other derived amphetamines were used as a stimulant for armed forces during World War II and the Korean War. It became a popular drug with the Beat Generation and long haul truckers who used 'bennies" to stay awake.

The trucker is wolfing down pills. Over dosing. Out of control. He's swerving all over the road and begins to hallucinate on coming headlights. He turns the wheel and goes over the embankment. Crash and Burn!

The rash of trucking accidents across the nation with amphetamine overdosed drivers, alerts the FDA they send undercover agents across the country to infiltrate the various trucking firms to get leads on dealers and suppliers. Tom Kaylor (Peter Graves) is sent winging it to Los Angeles.

Tom is assigned to Bodmer Freight Lines as a trainee. He gets accommodations at a rooming house run by Val Owens (Marla Powers), a widow of a trucker. One of the roomers is a "cowboy" trucker named Mink Reynolds (Chuck Connors). Mink is a real piece of work, and if your used to seeing Chuck Connors only in re-runs of The Rifleman, this performance is an eye opener. Instead of a Stoic and cool as ice rancher, here Connors is a juking, jitterbugging, wild eyed and a bit wound too tight truck driving man.

The film is a real hoot, mostly for the revelation that Chuck Connors has quite some range. He is the obviously the  highlight for me. Every time you see him he's upped the wattage on his drugged out performance. The rest of the cast plugs away adequately at their rolls. Tom and Val get some sparks going in the romance department.

Death In Small Doses was directed by Joseph M. Newman (Abandoned (1949) 711 Ocean Drive (1950), Dangerous Crossing (1953), The Human Jungle (1954)), The film was written by John McGreevey and was  based on an Saturday Evening Post article by Arthur L. Davis. The cinematography was by Carl E. Guthrie (eleven filn noir) and the music was by Robert Wiley Miller  and Emil Newman.  Screen caps in Film Noir ?Gangster pages. Source Youtube. Entertaining, 6-7/10. Full review on Noirsville

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The Strange Case of Dr. Rx (1942):  I thought this was going to be your basic mad scientist caper..and that probably would've been more entertaining.  Dr. Rx is a serial killer, who has strangled five men who have 'beaten the rap' using the same shady lawyer and walked free despite evidence that they've committed crimes.  Private detective Patric Knowles is asked by a police pal to help with the case, and agrees to keep an eye on a sixth potential victim..but he's murdered too and marked with the same little prescription pad note (hence the title).  Knowles' old flame Anne Gwynne, a writer, comes back into his life and they marry (this is all sort of vague..is it a day later? a week?) but she doesn't have a lot to do in the film, although they do argue a lot for newlyweds.  Shemp Howard is even cast as a policeman to pull off a little silliness..and then there's the gorilla: is it my imagination or did Universal roll out this gorilla suit for every B horror/thriller venture?  I never understood the 'terror' of it, I guess, and it's brief appearance makes little  sense here.  There are some talented actors in secondary roles..Mona Barrie, Samuel S. Hinds, Paul Cavanagh, Lionel Atwill..but I doubt even a "A" list roster could've helped this B film much. The plot is messy, sporadic, and fairly dull.  source: Classic Reel     

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17 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

 -

This was the first of the Hopalong Cassidy films to feature Robert Mitchum, here playing an unshaven minor bad guy. This was only his second speaking role in films, but he received enough fan mail that Boyd kept [him on]

ae6c5449fe4baf8a70318e50808a1768.jpg

damn, i can see why!

that profile! those eyes!

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