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Ship of Fools (1965) about the editing:

Lt. Huebner (Werner Klemperer): "I observe people... they travel on boats often always searching for something...."

 

Lee Marvin recounting Pedro Cerrano's Bats Are Afraid.... I mean- Curve Ball On The Outside Corner story to Michael Dunn plays out as all good midnight howls should - one swig at a time.

 

Characters contemplating their life or realizing the lies they have accepted, I think, calls for editing that breathes. Not everyone is reflecting but they all are 'off the grid with the wheels turning' approaching 1933 Germany.

The characters and the audience don't have the luxury of getting off the ship when things get uncomfortable and that's fine.

Its why I think Cast Away (2000) works and why I like Nicholson's performance in The Shining (1980).

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Last of the Mobile Hotshots

 

Did anyone else get up early this morning and turn on TCM?  I hope not.  It was a 1970 version of a little known Tennessee Williams play, starring James Coburn and Lynn Redgrave.  I usually like all three of those people, but this was one of the worst things I've ever seen.  Redgrave seems to think an American southern accent is achieved by throwing your voice into falsetto and screeching as loud as possible.

 

The whole thing seemed like a Carol Burnette Show parody of the  southern plays done by Joanne Woodward or Orson Welles.  I would have written a one star review to warn others but I couldn't bear to watch the whole thing.

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AndreaDoria--Yes, I was up to see "Ship of Fools" (one of the few Vivien Leigh films I hadn't seen) & decided to give this a try,  By the way--film Comcast in East TN showed was titled "Blood Kin"--an alternate title for "The Last of the Mobile Hot Shots"--so I don't know if we saw Exactly the same film or not.

 

Anyway--Atmospherically, Williams had the opening five minutes of the film caught: the Rural South in the 50's or 60's ; the camera takes you into what looks like a revival tent, but is instead a furniture store owner running a game show to publicize his furniture store.  Then the plot takes over, and--the only thing that kept me watching was Lynn Redgrave.  She had the part of a dimwit who Never shuts up down cold, and she was funny during the first forty minutes.  I'm Guessing she put her voice in falsetto so she would sound younger; she speaks incessantly of going to Hollywood in films' first fifteen minutes.

 

I gave up on "Blood Kin" when the whatever percentage brothers started yelling at each other, so I missed Redgraves' screeching.  "Blood Kin"  was a big disappointment.

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The Naked Road (1959) Tail Fin Noir

 

Naked%20Road%20Poster_zpseoexpzwi.jpg

 

Directed by William Martin, Writer: William Martin, Stars: Jeanne Rainer as Gay Andrews, Ronald Long as Wayne Jackson, Art Koulias as Mark Gallo and Paul Judson as Bob Walker.
 
Model Gay Andrews who kind of looks like a Shelly Fabres is a loner in NYC. She gets a come on from married add executive Bob Walker a Steve Cochran look-a-like, after a gig in New Jersey. He wants to continue their necking session at a hot sheet motel. She turns him down but on their way back to NYC they get pulled over by a cop who hauls them to a corrupt JP who is in cahoots with a local pimp Wayne Jackson played by big man Ronald Long ( Love of Life (1951), The Notorious Landlady (1962) and The List of Adrian Messenger (1963) who both resembles and sounds like an Alfred Hitchcock with hair. 
 
When  Walker leaves to get money so that he can pay his fine in cash, the JP detains Andrews as a hostage until his return. Long is on hand an hour later to rescue Andrews. He pays the $100 fine and the JP tells her she's free. Long offers to give her a ride.  At a cafe Long slips a drug into Gays drink and she wakes up at Longs house. A Classic tale of don't go home with strangers.
 
Koulias is good as Longs right hand man. The entire story is an instructional on white slavery, but it's poster decries the "Public Relations Racket", the girl is first offered $50,000 for one year of service with the guarantee that she can go free after the year is up, then threatened with getting forced hooked on horse if she wont cooperate voluntarily. 
 
It's all done very on the cheap and is a bit clunky in spots, but the film still manages to entertain mostly by what is suggested during all the descriptive dialog (supplied mostly by Long) rather than what actually happens. 6/10 Two out of two are OK. So far so good in Something Weird's "Six Weird Noirs"
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So far so good in Something Weird's "Six Weird Noirs"

 

Thank you for that review. I was given about 20 DVDs by Something Weird and am slogging through them deciding if they go on the shelf (keeper) or pass along (stinkers). With Something Weird, goes one way or the other & depends wholly on the viewer.

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So far so good in Something Weird's "Six Weird Noirs"

 

Thank you for that review. I was given about 20 DVDs by Something Weird and am slogging through them deciding if they go on the shelf (keeper) or pass along (stinkers). With Something Weird, goes one way or the other & depends wholly on the viewer.

I know what you mean that was the situation with Neo Noir Aroused (1967) it's shoehorned in with two barely plotted real sexploitation titles on another Something Weird DVD, and it's really worth re-discovery, the cinematography is great . I did a review with screen caps in the Film Noir /Gangster section under Recently watched Noir.

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I went to the Regent Street Cinema in London today to see The Astonished Heart (1950), which was shown as part of a Noel Coward on Film series. I had never seen the film -- it's a fascinating combination of period -- noir -- melodrama. Starred Mr. Coward, Celia Johnson, Margaret Leighton, Graham Payn, and Joyce Carey. 

 

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I went to the Regent Street Cinema in London today to see The Astonished Heart (1950), which was shown as part of a Noel Coward on Film series. I had never seen the film -- it's a fascinating combination of period -- noir -- melodrama. Starred Mr. Coward, Celia Johnson, Margaret Leighton, Graham Payn, and Joyce Carey. 

 

79047476-england-molyneux-designs-clothi

 

"The Astonished Heart" : what a great title !  I've neither seen this, nor even heard of it, but just by that title and the cast alone (Margaret Leighton ! ), I'd like to see it.

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"The Astonished Heart" : what a great title !  I've neither seen this, nor even heard of it, but just by that title and the cast alone (Margaret Leighton ! ), I'd like to see it.

It originated as a short play, part of Coward's Tonight at 8:30 series. Another short play in that series was Still Life, which became the film Brief Encounter.

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I went to the Regent Street Cinema in London today to see The Astonished Heart (1950), which was shown as part of a Noel Coward on Film series.

 

Jealous!

There is an excellent box set "Noél Coward & David Lean Collection" in which I enjoyed every movie. Seeing it in a theater with others must have been spectacular. 35mm?

 

Last night I was escorted by two handsome film buddies to see HOLIDAY INN, which I haven't seen in 10 years. It was a stunning 35mm print - so fun to watch Astaire dance on the big screen. A small group sitting behind us had never seen it before and gaffawed and laughed at every antic...shows me these old films aren't "corny". There were several kids & tweens in attendance. Lots of smiling faces at the exit.

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The Naked Road (1959) Tail Fin Noir

 

Naked%20Road%20Poster_zpseoexpzwi.jpg

 

Aside from whatever the quality of an often exploitational little "B" like this may be, I usually get a kick out of the poster artwork. This one is no exception. Thanks for the fun review, cigarjoe.

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Last of the Mobile Hotshots

 

Did anyone else get up early this morning and turn on TCM?  I hope not.  It was a 1970 version of a little known Tennessee Williams play, starring James Coburn and Lynn Redgrave.  I usually like all three of those people, but this was one of the worst things I've ever seen.  Redgrave seems to think an American southern accent is achieved by throwing your voice into falsetto and screeching as loud as possible.

 

The whole thing seemed like a Carol Burnette Show parody of the  southern plays done by Joanne Woodward or Orson Welles.  I would have written a one star review to warn others but I couldn't bear to watch the whole thing.

I didn't watch this one live, rather, I saw it On Demand, and watched probably about 5 minutes of it... And it was basically the worst film I've had the "pleasure" of watching.

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Christmas Eve (1947) 

 

Not on the upcoming TCM Christmas schedule, but I like the redemptive story of the three grown adoptive sons of the charming and eccentric Ann Harding, and their Christmas eve.  Nice character turns by George (no angles of the backside, please) Brent and Joan Blondell, Randolph Scott with Dolores Moran, Reginald Denny and Dennis Hoey.  

 

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Christmas Eve (1947) 

 

Not on the upcoming TCM Christmas schedule, but I like the redemptive story of the three grown adoptive sons of the charming and eccentric Ann Harding, and their Christmas eve.  Nice character turns by George (no angles of the backside, please) Brent and Joan Blondell, Randolph Scott with Dolores Moran, Reginald Denny and Dennis Hoey.  

 

uy3278hsmc2wx2.jpg

 

Yes,  this is a good later day role for the always enjoyable Ann Harding but Raft is stiffer than usual in this film. 

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...AND YOUR NAME IS JONAH (6/10)

 

Fairly routine problem-of-the-week tv movie. Sally Struthers and James Woods star as parents of a deaf child who was incorrectly diagnosed as mentally handicapped as a toddler and institutionalized. When the correct diagnosis is made, the child returns home, but severely developmentally delayed. The parents and educators must struggle to breakthrough to the boy,Jonah.

 

Future big and small screen heavy Robert Davi has an early role as a coworker of Woods.

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BEYOND THE POSEIDON ADVENTURE (4/10)

 

Belated, unwanted and unneeded sequel released 7 years after the hit original, the story is set immediately after. Michael Caine, Karl Malden and Sally Field star as a boat crew that comes across the capsized cruise ship Poseidon, and claims salvage rights. They are met by Telly Savalas and his team of sinister aid workers, and they join together to explore the wreck. They find various survivors, including a boorish Peter Boyle, ship's nurse Shirley Jones, femme fatale Veronica Hamel, drunken Slim Pickens, young couple Angela Cartwright & Mark Harmon, and Shirley Knight & Jack Warden as the older couple.

 

Slow-moving, dumb & irritating, the actors try their best, especially Field, but the script is beyond redemption. Final directorial effort from schlock tv and film maestro Irwin Allen.

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"Green Mansions" (1959)--It's easy to see why 1959 critics called it "muddled". The film, which is set in South America's jungles, manages to be an ecological statement (man should take care of his surroundings (film implies this very strongly), a love story, a tale of redemption (in films' first ten minutes, Abel (Anthony Perkins) sees his father killed & vows vengeance on the killers--I won't spoil GM by totally giving away the plot--Audrey Hepburn as Rima does her utmost in a near impossible part.  Lee J. Cobb overacts as Rima's protector.

 

MGM spent over one million getting shots of South America to mix in with the main filming done on MGM's back lot--the mixing in of the shots is well done, but it's still obvious what was shot at MGM & which are the South American jungle shots.  Perkins is the voice of sanity in the film--whenever film's plot threatens to get too wispy, he brings it back down to earth.  He has a scene where he serenades Rima--Perkins had a lovely tenor--he was never in a film musical--a pity.

 

If film has a "message"--it's that 'True love never dies."  I'd be delighted to have this become a "regular" on TCM--I'd much rather see this than "Mame" (1974).

 

 

He was in a musical on Broadway. I think it was Greenwillow? (Frank Loesser) I agree Green Mansions is a misfire, but for some reason I can watch it and still get into it. Audrey did it for her hubby (Mel Ferrer) who directed it. I'm sure her casting got the film made. I dont think Perkins and Audrey click too well in it.

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AndreaDoria--Yes, I was up to see "Ship of Fools" (one of the few Vivien Leigh films I hadn't seen) & decided to give this a try,  By the way--film Comcast in East TN showed was titled "Blood Kin"--an alternate title for "The Last of the Mobile Hot Shots"--so I don't know if we saw Exactly the same film or not.

 

Anyway--Atmospherically, Williams had the opening five minutes of the film caught: the Rural South in the 50's or 60's ; the camera takes you into what looks like a revival tent, but is instead a furniture store owner running a game show to publicize his furniture store.  Then the plot takes over, and--the only thing that kept me watching was Lynn Redgrave.  She had the part of a dimwit who Never shuts up down cold, and she was funny during the first forty minutes.  I'm Guessing she put her voice in falsetto so she would sound younger; she speaks incessantly of going to Hollywood in films' first fifteen minutes.

 

I gave up on "Blood Kin" when the whatever percentage brothers started yelling at each other, so I missed Redgraves' screeching.  "Blood Kin"  was a big disappointment.

 

 

Sorry I missed this. I'm sure it's bad, but even bad Tennessee Williams I'd still want to watch (once anyway) I never realized TCM ever showed this film. The play flopped on Broadway with Estelle Parsons after only a few performances.  (it was called the 7 Descents of Myrtle). Dunno why anyone thought a film version would do better, even with a name change. I remember it opening and closing in a week everywhere and it was gone.........

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I sat down and watched The Body Snatcher today. I've seen bits of it before over the years, but never the whole thing. I liked it. Karloff's character was so evil, so murderous. Didn't think twice about killing somebody and then humming a tune afterward. Great movie for Karloff's birthday.

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Last night I watched Juliet of the Spirits, a favorite movie, and my favorite Fellini film.  His movies are like entering a dreamworld, all fantasy and symbols.  Not to mention the stunning clothing!  Every time I watch I discover something new, a certain glance or phrase, even just a detail of the house, or the house of the neighbor.  (And what a neighbor!)  I'm mad about that house, with its Art Nouveau lines, beautiful glass, and plunging tunnel from a bedroom to a pool.

 

Each time I watch I vow to learn Italian.  One day!

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I sat down and watched The Body Snatcher today. I've seen bits of it before over the years, but never the whole thing. I liked it. Karloff's character was so evil, so murderous. Didn't think twice about killing somebody and then humming a tune afterward. Great movie for Karloff's birthday.

 

In his book ALTERNATE OSCARS, Danny Peary argues (quite well) that KARLOFF deserved the 1945 Best Actor Oscar for THE BODY SNATCHER. .

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He was in a musical on Broadway. I think it was Greenwillow? (Frank Loesser) I agree Green Mansions is a misfire, but for some reason I can watch it and still get into it. Audrey did it for her hubby (Mel Ferrer) who directed it. I'm sure her casting got the film made. I dont think Perkins and Audrey click too well in it.

 

No, they don't. But he's so pretty. And Henry Silva is surprisingly buff. Besides that and laughingly discerning the various houseplants they use as jungle foliage, I got enough in GREEN MANSIONS to keep me entertained.

 

The book SUCKS though.

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No, they don't. But he's so pretty. And Henry Silva is surprisingly buff. Besides that and laughingly discerning the various houseplants they use as jungle foliage, I got enough in GREEN MANSIONS to keep me entertained.

 

The book SUCKS though.

 

 

I read the classic comic version, about a century ago. I remember I was fascinated by it.

 

$_35.JPG

 

Ah yes, all the great literature I consumed through Classic Comics Illustrated...

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No, they don't. But he's so pretty. And Henry Silva is surprisingly buff. Besides that and laughingly discerning the various houseplants they use as jungle foliage, I got enough in GREEN MANSIONS to keep me entertained.

 

The book SUCKS though.

 

 

LOL. I never got aound to reading the book........I've heard its quite different than the movie version?

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