Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

Watched 'The Shawshank Redemption' (1994) Sunday evening.

 

It's only the 2nd time I've watched it, and as is often the case with movies, had more appreciation for it the 2nd time.

 

It is the highest rated movie of all-time on IMDb, I believe. A score of 9.4. Personally, I don't think it's THAT good, but it is very compelling.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Watched 'The Shawshank Redemption' (1994) Sunday evening.

 

It's only the 2nd time I've watched it, and as is often the case with movies, had more appreciation for it the 2nd time.

 

It is the highest rated movie of all-time on IMDb, I believe. A score of 9.4. Personally, I don't think it's THAT good, but it is very compelling.

Did you like the ending?  The bit when Morgan Freeman joins him on the beach?

I sort of had mixed feelings about it.  I don't read Stephen King so I would't know if that was in the book, or not.

But it kind of had the feeling of an ending that was tacked on after a test-audience screening.  It certainly wasn't a 60's ending.  Too happy and neat.

I'm not trying to second-guess the imdb's most popular movie in history for that ending did the trick for many people.  Left them happy going home.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I didn't actually just watch, but I did begin watching Long Day's Journey Into Night. I've always wanted to see it and checked it out of the library. I have to return it today.  It looks to be a monumental film experience, with an amazing cast (Hepburn, Richardson, Robards, Stockwell) and looks brilliant in black and white. Unlike many films, I think it should be watched straight through -- and it's 170 minutes. But I think you just have to be in the mood to watch it. Maybe later in the summer.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I didn't actually just watch, but I did begin watching Long Day's Journey Into Night. I've always wanted to see it and checked it out of the library. I have to return it today.  It looks to be a monumental film experience, with an amazing cast (Hepburn, Richardson, Robards, Stockwell) and looks brilliant in black and white. Unlike many films, I think it should be watched straight through -- and it's 170 minutes. But I think you just have to be in the mood to watch it. Maybe later in the summer.

It's nice to see Ralph Richardson with such a meaty film role.

I skipped the David Suchet stage version in London last year because I didn't know if I could sit in my chair that long.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I didn't actually just watch, but I did begin watching Long Day's Journey Into Night. I've always wanted to see it and checked it out of the library. I have to return it today.  It looks to be a monumental film experience, with an amazing cast (Hepburn, Richardson, Robards, Stockwell) and looks brilliant in black and white. Unlike many films, I think it should be watched straight through -- and it's 170 minutes. But I think you just have to be in the mood to watch it. Maybe later in the summer.

This quote made me chuckle a bit:

 

Joseph E. Levine bought the film for distribution but said he lost money on it. "You cannot stay in business by making O'Neill pictures," he said.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's nice to see Ralph Richardson with such a meaty film role.

I skipped the David Suchet stage version in London last year because I didn't know if I could sit in my chair that long.

I'm embarrassed to admit I have never seen it, either on stage or film! I've programmed many O'Neill scenes, but I don't think from that play. There's going to be a production in NY next year, with Jessica Lange and Gabriel Byrne -- I might try to see that.

 

In his book Stage Blood, Michael Blakemore gives a fascinating account of directing Olivier in the play.

 

I did see Strange Interlude in London (NT) a couple of years ago. Good production, although the hairdo of the mother-in-law bothered me for some strange reason. There was an excellent production of Desire Under the Elms at the Lyric Hammersmith three years ago.

 

This fall, there's going to be a production of The Hairy Ape at the Old Vic.

Link to post
Share on other sites

(Very minor spoilers here, ok to read IMO)

 

Blast of Silence is a late noir (i.e. 1961) and a pretty, pretty, pretty, good flick and maybe somewhat of a sleeper since I have not heard tell of it no how on these boards. It is the story of a hit man. The circumstances which comprise the plight of the average noir hero (or anti-hero) are probably many and varied. A guy might be living an ordinary life and suddenly be hurled into the mire by fate. Or another maybe a guy who has a dangerous life style but finally makes the mistake that begins the nightmare. In this case, however, the hero has apparently and seemingly been so afflicted since the womb. This is wonderfully depicted in an opening sequence that should go down as a classic, in my view. I shall not reveal it but it is immensely satisfying and an excellent way to begin the show.

 

This movie made me appreciate the professionalism of what it might be like to be hit man. Not that it would appeal to me, personally, but this guy knows what he's doing. We follow the planning leading up to thing itself but the movie is less about the situation and much more the man, his mental state. To that degree that he is good at what he does, to that same degree perhaps, he is not so good at feeling good and being happy. This is dramatized by a rare second-person narration, which (as a reminder) goes something like this:

 

You open your eyes and it's a new day and the same feeling comes over you just like yesterday, that clammy feeling, and that feeling of hatred, for your old man, for yesterday, for today, for tomorrow, for Christmas, for just about everything, and you wonder will this ever end ...

 

...a voice-over that work quites well and is mercifully not overdone or too overbearing. It works because it tells the viewer what's going through the guy's head and how he is experiencing it, an economical way time-wise of letting us know this guy.

 

I had never heard of any of the players, a bunch of no-namers (to me at least) and I found that refreshing, no hearkening back to any prior roles. The lead is not a veteran actor (I don't believe) and his performance perhaps shows as he comes off rather stiff, even a little dull. The good news is that it works for the character, who is a loner and socially inept (with women as well as with prior male buddy acquaintances he comes across), all serving to accentuate his obvious isolation. Some of his lines seem awkward, but as I say, it works. That's just the way Frankie Bono is.

 

There is a greasy gun dealer that is played by a soft-spoken fat man, a small but juicy role. There is also a sweet girl who is sympathetic to Frankie but to only to a point, she is way to far on the right side of the tracks. I really liked  her, both the character and the actress. There are no femmes fatales. Frankie is messed up enough, he doesn't need one of those to do him in. (Noir experts here can inform me whether or not she qualifies or not as being one, a sort of virtual femme fatale. I wouldn't mind some feedback on that.)

 

There is a neo-realistic element. The camera takes to the street of NYC, mostly Manhattan; Rockefeller Center at Christmas time (where everyone seems happy except Frankie), Staten Island (the Ferry) and elsewhere. Some of you NYers would probably recognize more that I could.

 

I won't say much about the story except that given Frankie Bono's character, the norm for him would probably entail going the job site (if you will, whatever city) and carry out his dastardly task in the time allotted, spending most of his time in a hotel alone. But here, a chance encounter with a old friend (from the orphanage) leads to involvement with still others (including the girl) and this drives the story. New conflicts arise in the already troubled mind of Frankie Bono and he considers the possibility of change. Can he do it?

 

I don't know if this has ever been shown on TCM, no idea. It's available on Netflix. Noir fans who haven't seen this definitely should. It probably doesn't rise to highest level of the genre (or maybe I'm not giving enough credit) but it's certainly a good watch, and again, the opening sequence is superb.

 

--

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I don't know if this has ever been shown on TCM, no idea. It's available on Netflix. Noir fans who haven't seen this definitely should. It probably doesn't rise to highest level of the genre (or maybe I'm not giving enough credit) but it's certainly a good watch, and again, the opening sequence is superb.

 

--

It has, and I remember seeing it.  There is probably a thread on it somewhere.

Link to post
Share on other sites

laffite; just did a little searching in TCM reviews. Best as I can tell, last time Blast of Silence was shown was in 2012.  It is also one of the best reviewed films in TCM reviews I've run across; 5 out of 5 stars in almost every category.  Cast are no-namers to me also (I'm definitely not an expert), but I can help you with one name.  The credited narrator is Lionel Stander, best known for his stint as a rough-voiced good guy on the television series Hart to Hart (1979-1985?).  You can see an early performance of Standers' in Fritz Langs' "Hangmen Also Die" (1943) which is scheduled to be shown June 8th.  Am unsure of what time it will be shown--I'm in a different Time Zone than you.  Good find--TCMs' article on the film says it's hard to find.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you like James Whale movies where everybody acts like they're in a movie by James Whale, then a James Whale movie like this is a movie by James Whale you will like.

 

5GMDIbZ.jpg

 

 

 

Riding high after Bride of Frankenstein (a film mentioned in the dialogue) James Whale chose to make this bizarre mating of The Thin Man with The Old Dark House, partly so he could get out of directing Dracula's Daughter (also mentioned here -- did any other director so love in-jokes?). Rich, spoiled, and zany socialites Robert Young and Constance Cummings attend a drinking party with their equally alcoholic Long Island friends (Whale lovingly shows them cavorting amidst some mind-bogglingly art-deco sets) and perform such charming antics as destroying expensive furniture, driving drunk, and firing a cannon at a passing ship (and as for the blackface business, I'm an enemy of PC but even I was bit nonplussed by it). The next morning the partygoers wake up to find one of them has been murdered, but they were so drunk they can't remember what happened (the film is based on a novel called The Hangover Murders, but the Hays Office would not permit that title to be used).

 

Cummings and Young remind me as much of Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald as Nick and Nora Charles, and the wild party seems like a nostalgic holdover from the 1920s. It's hard to be believe depression audiences would be entertained by such aimless and destructive shenanigans. Perhaps Whale identified with the characters' self indulgence.

 

Cummings and Young aren't even the main sleuths -- that role belongs to Edward Arnold, who storms into the film after the party section and proceeds to bellow and bark his way through the role. Arnold could show charm even as a heavy in films like Diamond Jim and The Toast Of New York, so I choose to blame his misjudged performance on Whale.

 

Aside from Whale, RLN's main interest comes from its sets, its alcoholism, and the presence of the underappreciated Constance Cummings, who might have been a major star if she had not left the US for the UK with her British husband, screenwriter Benn Levy. This and Harold Lloyd's Movie Crazy were her best Hollywood roles.

 

 

ge2qU8S.jpg

 

Mswxjkm.jpg

 

GOc5ApA.jpg

 

 

0naZC05.jpg

 

 

Y0RlK9K.jpg

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched 3 movies recorded from last month:

HONEYMOON FOR THREE & ONE MORE TOMORROW, two with Ann Sheridan. I never "got" Sheridan, why she was so popular. She seemed kind of contrived and not all THAT pretty judging from movies I had seen previously.

 

Well, TCM's spotlight on Sheridan worked, because after watching these 2 movies, I finally "got" what made her so popular. 

 

Both movies were kind of silly fluff, but very enjoyable. (I sometimes don't need more than that to be entertained) Sheridan was beautiful and modern looking, she could have walked off the screen into today, she looked so modern. Pretty, and natural.

Finally got to see George Brent, I don't know WHAT anyone sees in him. (Sheridan was married to Brent)

 

I also watched ROUGHLY SPEAKING, although I couldn't recall why I recorded it. It was a power performance by Roz Russell who played an independent woman seeking a career. She played a sort of Candide charactor, that just kept a positive attitude no matter what befell her. Roz just sparkled in that one (Mank said "breakout role") and it was great to see Jack Carson in a larger than usual sidekick role.

 

Priceless the first view of Carson he's in top hat & tux with a candle lit Christmas tree attached to his hat! I really liked their pairing-two strong charactors. Also interesting Roz's kids contract polio reminding me of her role as Sister Kenny.

Russell isn't for everyone, but I like her larger-than-life persona, bossy nature and joy of life she brings to the screen.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I also watched ROUGHLY SPEAKING, although I couldn't recall why I recorded it. It was a power performance by Roz Russell who played an independent woman seeking a career. She played a sort of Candide charactor, that just kept a positive attitude no matter what befell her. Roz just sparkled in that one (Mank said "breakout role") and it was great to see Jack Carson in a larger than usual sidekick role.

 

Priceless the first view of Carson he's in top hat & tux with a candle lit Christmas tree attached to his hat! I really liked their pairing-two strong charactors. Also interesting Roz's kids contract polio reminding me of her role as Sister Kenny.

Russell isn't for everyone, but I like her larger-than-life persona, bossy nature and joy of life she brings to the screen.

I've posted this before but wanted to mention it again, in the context of your Roughly Speaking comment. The movie is based on a true story, written by Louise Randall Pierson, the woman portrayed by Russell, who also wrote the screenplay, so one assumes Russell the actress was also right for the character (I love Russell). In addition, one of Pierson's kids, who is portrayed in the movie, grew up to be screenwriter Frank Pierson, who won an Oscar for writing Dog Day Afternoon. He also served as President of the Writers Guild and of AMPAS.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I didn't actually just watch, but I did begin watching Long Day's Journey Into Night. I've always wanted to see it and checked it out of the library. I have to return it today. It looks to be a monumental film experience, with an amazing cast (Hepburn, Richardson, Robards, Stockwell) and looks brilliant in black and white. Unlike many films, I think it should be watched straight through -- and it's 170 minutes. But I think you just have to be in the mood to watch it. Maybe later in the summer.

Swithin, I think your right, you definitely must be in the mood to watch it. Granted it is long and yes, watch it all through, if you can. The first time I saw it I thought it was just okay. I think every cast member did an outstanding job. Hepburn breaks my heart when she says to her husband "I tried so hard"(to overcome her morphine addiction.) They all have their own issues. I think it's an undervalued movie. Not everyone will like it but try to see it.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for that trivia tidbit, Swithin. Inneresting!

 

And I too have A LONG DAYS JOURNEY INTO NIGHT. Couldn't get through it, glad I'm not alone. I'll try next time I'm snowed in and have a cold. That's how I got through (& loved) LAWRENCE OF ARABIA. It's like a 3 hour Bollywood film, you have to commit to watching and it's always worth it.

 

Last night we all watched GOING IN STYLE since seeing on the schedule for TCM. We all enjoyed it. It was great seeing scenes of NYC and LasVegas from the 70's. Mr Teek did not realize Art Carney was Ed Norton on the Honeymooners!  He only knew Carney from his second career as an elderly man. Oy.

 

So now we're going to watch all the "old people" movies they've not seen like, OH GOD, THE SUNSHINE BOYS and COCOON. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

a Long Day's Journey Into Night is one of those films that anyone who likes great acting should watch. I think everyone is really good in the film and the story is compelling.

I could tell that I would really like it, just that I have to be in the right mood.  It's 170 minutes, but I do feel it should be watched straight through. I can watch some long films in segments (Fanny and Alexander was one that worked very well that way), but Long Day's Journey is different.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just went to see The Voice of the Moon (1990) Federico Fellini's last film which I just at TIFF, the Toronto Cinematheque.

 

It was just dreadful.  No wonder it was never released in North America.  Very much a bad 8 1/2 with all of the same themes and types of set pieces.  Hundreds of crazy extras and lots and lots of bit actors with something to say before we are wisked to the next bit.  It is a Fellini dream without the story anchor that 8 1/2 had.  Very draining to watch.

 

The afternoon's saving grace was that Roberto Benigni introduced the film and he was in top form.  And I must say that he has hardly changed one bit in 25 years.  (Damn him)

He talks enthusiastically a mile a minute.  And while I once suspected that his mangled English Oscar speech was a routine I discovered that he really does talk like that.  He even had an interpreter beside him for the words that eluded him.

 

One anecdote was great.  He related that every word in a Fellini film is replaced in post sync.  So, while on other films sets there is a buzz of activity and then dead silence when the director yells action it is the exact opposite on a Fellini film.

 

There is dead silence and when action comes, Benigni and others are supposed to act while Fellini yells instructions non-stop.  And the cinematographer yells.  And the grip yells and so does everyone else.  He says it is complete chaos and bedlam when the cameras are rolling.

 

Benigni also mentioned that a Toronto University has given him a doctorate.  So he is now Dr. Benigni.  The audience loved that.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

laffite; just did a little searching in TCM reviews. Best as I can tell, last time Blast of Silence was shown was in 2012.  It is also one of the best reviewed films in TCM reviews I've run across; 5 out of 5 stars in almost every category.  Cast are no-namers to me also (I'm definitely not an expert), but I can help you with one name.  The credited narrator is Lionel Stander, best known for his stint as a rough-voiced good guy on the television series Hart to Hart (1979-1985?).  You can see an early performance of Standers' in Fritz Langs' "Hangmen Also Die" (1943) which is scheduled to be shown June 8th.  Am unsure of what time it will be shown--I'm in a different Time Zone than you.  Good find--TCMs' article on the film says it's hard to find.

 

Thanks for the info, nice work. That narrator was excellent, I had the feeling I had heard that voice before. I can't imagine anyone doing better. I forgot to mention that Blast of Silence is very low budget though it was no liability. Sometimes low-budget is good because it make you keep it simple.

 

Another great narrating voice is Alexander Scourby. I should have looked him up before posting but just to say he has an outstanding voice. When i was a kid there this television program called Panic! a very suspenseful half-hour show which I don't think was a big headliner, but it scared me, i was utterly fascinated with it. The show always began with a voice over and I believe it was Scourby.

Link to post
Share on other sites

lafitte-Glad to know the information I found was useful.  Didi you see Hangmen Also Die (1943) last night?  Film was grimmer than I remembered; had forgotten it was based on a true incident.  Stander made his appearance early in film--as cabman/Resistance/Underground fighter Nazis picked up.  His performance lasted maybe 10 minutes.  He threw himself out plate glass window rather than give any information to Nazis.

 

About Scourby--Yes, he had an arresting voice.  He also made some films--never attained stardom, but made some interesting ones.  I've seen 2:

 

The Devil at Four O' Clock (1961)--Spencer Tracy & Frank Sinatra film about a volcanic island in the Pacific.  Scourby plays the panicked governor.  Film is scheduled for a July 2015 airing, so I won't comment further.

 

The Shaggy Dog (1959)--One of Disneys' live action efforts, and one of his less gooey efforts (the opposite of The Original, All Time, something something Family Band (1968), where one minute of Goldie Hawn dancing (in her debut film) doesn't save 119 minutes of mucus and bad acting).  I've forgotten Scourbys' role in TSD.

Link to post
Share on other sites

lafitte-Glad to know the information I found was useful.  Didi you see Hangmen Also Die (1943) last night?  Film was grimmer than I remembered; had forgotten it was based on a true incident.  Stander made his appearance early in film--as cabman/Resistance/Underground fighter Nazis picked up.  His performance lasted maybe 10 minutes.  He threw himself out plate glass window rather than give any information to Nazis.

 

About Scourby--Yes, he had an arresting voice.  He also made some films--never attained stardom, but made some interesting ones.  I've seen 2:

 

The Devil at Four O' Clock (1961)--Spencer Tracy & Frank Sinatra film about a volcanic island in the Pacific.  Scourby plays the panicked governor.  Film is scheduled for a July 2015 airing, so I won't comment further.

 

The Shaggy Dog (1959)--One of Disneys' live action efforts, and one of his less gooey efforts (the opposite of The Original, All Time, something something Family Band (1968), where one minute of Goldie Hawn dancing (in her debut film) doesn't save 119 minutes of mucus and bad acting).  I've forgotten Scourbys' role in TSD.

Poor Hangmen Must Die. Experts are declaring it unwatchable.

Link to post
Share on other sites

... Robinson Crusoe on Mars.  I haven't seen this in about 40 years or so, but it still holds up well. Just three actors:  Adam West (who departs quickly), Paul Mantee, and Vic Lundin.  Also, one monkey. Mantee, as the spaceshipwrecked survivor, is in virtually every scene and carries the film, with good support from Lundin as an alien "Friday." The special effects are decent, and kept to a minimum. The photography is great; much of this was filmed in Death Valley. If you can stick with its 1 hr 50 minute running time, it's a good survival story.

Link to post
Share on other sites

... Robinson Crusoe on Mars.  I haven't seen this in about 40 years or so, but it still holds up well. Just three actors:  Adam West (who departs quickly), Paul Mantee, and Vic Lundin.  Also, one monkey. Mantee, as the spaceshipwrecked survivor, is in virtually every scene and carries the film, with good support from Lundin as an alien "Friday." The special effects are decent, and kept to a minimum. The photography is great; much of this was filmed in Death Valley. If you can stick with its 1 hr 50 minute running time, it's a good survival story.

 

Did Tor Johnson make an appearance? He might have fit in somewhere. He could have been cast as Mars.

 

You didn't mention Tor in this post at all. I am fairly reeling in amazement.

;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Did Tor Johnson make an appearance? He might have fit in somewhere. He could have been cast as Mars.

 

You didn't mention Tor in this post at all. I am fairly reeling in amazement.

;)

Sorry. Tor played a meatyor.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...