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You answered a private message with a public crying jag rather than conversing with whoever it was who pm'd you?

 

I have doubts as to whether this story about being ordered to "cease and desist" is entirely truthful. If the person who messaged you comes forward, it'll be interesting to hear what the other side of this has to say.

 

W. T. F.  I have my thoughts on who this might be.

 

Lawrence, just stick around.  You have many fans here.

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Again, thanks to those of you who either messaged me or posted their support on here. I appreciate it, really. But this isn't worth the hassle.

 

Enjoy your thread.

 

Lawrence,

 

I hope you take some time .. however much is needed but please don't make up your mind to take such an action because of one person.  I've enjoyed your reviews and comments.  I hope you read all the postive comments posted and decide to ignore whoever told you that and continue on with your informative reviews and maybe start your own thread and make your own rules :)

 

P.S.  I clicked the "like this" on your comments but not because you said you are leaving but because of your explanation of your reason for being here, for you writing your reviews, and your intent to talk about classic movies and share with like minded passionate people who love classic moves ... great place to do it.  But again don't let one or two people spoil that for you or rob us of your commentary and posts.

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Lawrence--judging by the response here, you have more fans than detractors--don't let one person drive you away from this site.  You have the support of Moderator1 and most members who have posted.

 

We all have the support of moderator1.

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As the astute reader of my reviews may have noticed, most of the films I've written about lately were from 1979. Since the last review I wrote, I finished watching the last 8 titles I had from that year. Now I'll take a break from movie watching for awhile to catch up on other things and deal with the holidays. Because of my OCD way of watching things, when I eventually do start watching films again, it will be titles from the 1980's to now, and so I won't bother writing about them. This isn't really the crowd for those. Plus, I won't antagonize the sensibilities of the more prickly or, let's say, traditionalist amongst you. I'll stick to the Games section for the time being.

 

Postscript: what's past is past. It doesn't matter who sent me the PM. I won't divulge the name, nor should anyone care. After all, in the end, they got what they wanted: I'm done writing those offensive reviews.

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Because of my OCD way of watching things, when I eventually do start watching films again, it will be titles from the 1980's to now, and so I won't bother writing about them. This isn't really the crowd for those. 

Some of my favorite films are from the 1980s -- Reds; The Dead; A Passage to India; Enemies: A Love Story, to name four. And thanks to TCM, I was finally able to see The Age of Innocence (1993) a year or two ago. It has become one of my ten favorite movies of all time. So when you're ready, please don't deprive us of your commentaries!

 

And on a trashier note, I also enjoyed films like Pieces and Mortuary from the 1980s.

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"Unconquered" (1947)--American History 101, as told by director Cecil B. DeMille.  A remarkably good copy on YT, considering it had over 100,000 views--looked more like 10,000.   Film is generally a fun watch, although some of the lines had me rolling my eyes in disbelief (Paulette Goddard as Abby , to Gary Coopers character, who is intent on killing a foe to stop an Indian war: "You haven't blood in your veins--you've gunpowder!!").  Enjoyably silly movie requires Major suspension of disbelief, & an enjoyment of the ridiculous is a big help (Boris Karloff as a British-accented Seneca chieftain, Paulette Goddards' lack of any English accent, although she's playing a native of London, England are just two examples of the films silliness.  Minus the unbearably pompous 3-4 minutes of narration at films' beginning, 7/10 stars.

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As the astute reader of my reviews may have noticed, most of the films I've written about lately were from 1979. Since the last review I wrote, I finished watching the last 8 titles I had from that year. Now I'll take a break from movie watching for awhile to catch up on other things and deal with the holidays. Because of my OCD way of watching things, when I eventually do start watching films again, it will be titles from the 1980's to now, and so I won't bother writing about them. This isn't really the crowd for those. Plus, I won't antagonize the sensibilities of the more prickly or, let's say, traditionalist amongst you. I'll stick to the Games section for the time being.

 

Postscript: what's past is past. It doesn't matter who sent me the PM. I won't divulge the name, nor should anyone care. After all, in the end, they got what they wanted: I'm done writing those offensive reviews.

I really enjoyed the reviews, especially on films I forgot about or never heard of. I myself have been delving into Noirs and  Neo Noir's post 1960, but I usually put the reviews over in the Film Noir/Gangster board.

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"Unconquered" (1947)--American History 101, as told by director Cecil B. DeMille.  A remarkably good copy on YT, considering it had over 100,000 views--looked more like 10,000.   Film is generally a fun watch, although some of the lines had me rolling my eyes in disbelief (Paulette Goddard as Abby , to Gary Coopers character, who is intent on killing a foe to stop an Indian war: "You haven't blood in your veins--you've gunpowder!!").  Enjoyably silly movie requires Major suspension of disbelief, & an enjoyment of the ridiculous is a big help (Boris Karloff as a British-accented Seneca chieftain, Paulette Goddards' lack of any English accent, although she's playing a native of London, England are just two examples of the films silliness.  Minus the unbearably pompous 3-4 minutes of narration at films' beginning, 7/10 stars.

It's not a bad flick, for what it is, it may be the only film ever made about Pontiac's Rebellion, although, Pontiac is never mentioned.

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"Unconquered" (1947)--American History 101, as told by director Cecil B. DeMille.  A remarkably good copy on YT, considering it had over 100,000 views--looked more like 10,000.   Film is generally a fun watch, although some of the lines had me rolling my eyes in disbelief (Paulette Goddard as Abby , to Gary Coopers character, who is intent on killing a foe to stop an Indian war: "You haven't blood in your veins--you've gunpowder!!").  Enjoyably silly movie requires Major suspension of disbelief, & an enjoyment of the ridiculous is a big help (Boris Karloff as a British-accented Seneca chieftain, Paulette Goddards' lack of any English accent, although she's playing a native of London, England are just two examples of the films silliness.  Minus the unbearably pompous 3-4 minutes of narration at films' beginning, 7/10 stars.

 

I love Unconquered, unsophisticated as it may be. It's Saturday Afternoon at the Bijou time, courtesy the over-the-top presentation of Cecil B. DeMille. The film is rich in atmosphere and with an eye for detail in capturing colonial America, no matter what the ridiculousness of the situations may be at times. Yes, the casting of Boris Karloff as an Indian chief is a camp enthusiast's delight but, if taken in the right spirit, only adds to the delight of the fun.

 

The film is highlighted by a action set piece involving an escape from the Indians and plunge over a waterfalls. No credibility what's so ever as far as the real world is concerned. But who says this is the real world? It's the movies where the impossible can happen and we are along for the ride. Great fun, and a film with wonderful Technicolor enhancing its many visual pleasures.

 

I can't recommend Unconquered enough for those adventure seekers fully prepared to suspend their sense of disbelief in advance. The extremely handsome Universal DVD release of this film, by the way, has an introduction by Robert Osborne.

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Lawrence--judging by the response here, you have more fans than detractors--don't let one person drive you away from this site.  You have the support of Moderator1 and most members who have posted.

Truer words were never spoken, Lawrence. Think it over before leaving. You're obviously a passionate movie lover and you express yourself extremely well. Your contributions would be more than welcomed by most of us here, based on the comments on this thread.

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"Unconquered" (1947)--American History 101, as told by director Cecil B. DeMille.  A remarkably good copy on YT, considering it had over 100,000 views--looked more like 10,000.   Film is generally a fun watch, although some of the lines had me rolling my eyes in disbelief (Paulette Goddard as Abby , to Gary Coopers character, who is intent on killing a foe to stop an Indian war: "You haven't blood in your veins--you've gunpowder!!").  Enjoyably silly movie requires Major suspension of disbelief, & an enjoyment of the ridiculous is a big help (Boris Karloff as a British-accented Seneca chieftain, Paulette Goddards' lack of any English accent, although she's playing a native of London, England are just two examples of the films silliness.  Minus the unbearably pompous 3-4 minutes of narration at films' beginning, 7/10 stars.

 

just an FYI, UNCONQUERED was one of the top five box office hits of the year it was released- 1947- and that was a time when a huge percentage of the population went to movies weekly.

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Hammett (1982) A Noir Lovers Wet Dream

 

Director: Wim Wenders and based on Joe Gores (novel) with gorgeous, magic/poetic realism, cinematography by Joseph F. Biroc, and a haunting score by John Barry. 

 

Hammett is sort of an alcoholic stupor/dream of a PI flick, fully enforced by the storybook poetic/magic realism quality of the Zoetrope Studio sets and enhanced by a melancholy soundtrack. The story revolves around Dashiell "Sam" Hammett post his Pinkerton years, late 1920s, during his Pulp Fiction/Black Mask penny a word hack writer days, and the accounting of one last case or is it just another hard boiled tale? 8/10.

 

Trench%2BCoat%2BSam01.jpg

 

A fuller review in Film Noir/Gangster Board in the Recently Watched Noir thread with an additional link to the Noirsville review, enjoy!

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I just watched a great Made for TV 70's film called The Other Man  ('70) starring Roy Thinnes and Joan Hackett.  For anyone who has not seen the film I won't give anything away, but wanted to mention the lovely scenery and pathos and haunting background music to what could be termed a Film Noir.  This movie has it all; love, pathos, murder and unusual plot twists. 

 

I had first seen the movie when it was aired on TV in the early 70's and was quite entranced.  For several years I tried to acquire a copy without success, but finally found one through a message board for the film.

 

This film will keep you guessing right through to the end and stays with the viewer for years.  It was wonderful re-watching and seeing the beautiful scenery and hearing the haunting music again.  Joan Hackett gives a marvelous performance as the heroine of the film and Roy Thinnes is perfect as the person who is key to the story.  Tragically, Joan died all too soon, but was an important actress to the post-Golden Age.  Her fine performances and sensitive acting actually motivated me to really enjoy the film, though I usually prefer older Film Noirs,

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 Tragically, Joan died all too soon, but was an important actress to the post-Golden Age.  Her fine performances and sensitive acting actually motivated me to really enjoy the film, though I usually prefer older Film Noirs,

 

I'm a Joan Hackett fan also. Another TV movie I remember in which she was excellent was 'Class of '63' (1973). She looked great in that, too! Of 'The Group' (1966), she was definitely the one I had eyes for.

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I'm a Joan Hackett fan also. Another TV movie I remember in which she was excellent was 'Class of '63' (1973). She looked great in that, too! Of 'The Group' (1966), she was definitely the one I had eyes for.

Yes. I do think Joan was great in Class of '63 and The Group.  Her lovely, sensitive voice and diction enhanced the credence of whatever story she portrayed.  I recently saw some of her Alfred Hitchcock performances for the early 60's and was really impressed by her performances in them.   ALso, she was good in Five Desperate Women, another Film Noir of the Made for TV films of the 70's.  Though I had seen it some years ago I remembered the good acting and the story.

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"That's Entertainment  Part II" (1976)--Another nostalgia-fest from MGM.  This time lesser known musicals & performers are celebrated ("The Great Waltz" (1938) with Miliza Korjus--lady wasn't much of an actress, but had a sweet soprano that was on-key; Bobby Van as a human pogo stick in "Small Town Girl"(1953),to name just two).

 

 Film also celebrates Broadway performers before they became Stars ( Gwen Verdon in the Can-Can from 1952's "The Merry Widow"; TMW star Lana Turner can be glimpsed during cutaways from Verdon's number:  Bob Fosse and Carol Haney are shown in "From This Moment On", from 1953's "Kiss Me Kate".

 

 Some of Gene Kelly & Fred Astaires' more memorable numbers are also shown. Kelly or Astaire says in TE II "performances on film are preserved forever (I'm paraphrasing)  Unfortunately, we know film doesn't last forever.   A visual primer on why films should be preserved, and a fine introduction to MGM musicals--really, musicals in general, IMHO.  8/10 stars.

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I also watched That's Entertainment II.  I agree it was fun to see more of MGM's best musical numbers, though it seemed that this segment seemed to focus a lot on MGM's stars in general and not specifically musical numbers.  I love seeing Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire together.  Many try to portray Kelly and Astaire as competitors with the inevitable comparisons, however, from what I've read about Kelly and Astaire and seen of them together, this couldn't be farther from the truth.  They seem like great friends and the two men's dancing styles are so different and innovative in different ways, that there is room for both performers in the upper echelons of the dancing world.

 

I'm not a big fan of Esther Williams (mainly because she strikes me as dull), but I will say that her water skiing routine from Easy to Love was pretty impressive and I wouldn't mind seeing that film if only to see how the elaborate routine fit in within the context of the plot.  (I keep getting Easy to Love mixed up with Easy to Wed, both star Esther Williams, but the latter film costars Lucille Ball).  

 

Right now I'm watching National Velvet.  I've never seen this film before.  I love seeing a young Angela Lansbury.  Mickey Rooney (whom I'm usually not into) is pretty good in this movie as the jaded jockey trying to help 12-year old Elizabeth Taylor groom a horse into a competitor.  While Taylor is good in this film, I much prefer her adult siren roles over her child roles.  She is a bit over dramatic for my tastes.  From the title, I always assumed that the horse's name was "Velvet."  It's interesting that it's Taylor's character's name.  Anne Revere and Donald Crisp are excellent as Taylor's parents.  I missed the beginning of this film because I was busy assembling a soup in my crockpot for dinner later tonight and missed the set up of the film.  I may need to watch later on Watch TCM or get the film via Netflix. 

 

TCM's programming today is on a roll.  Next up is The Clock, which I love.  After that is Suspicion, one of my favorite Hitchcock films and The Essential at 5pm is Here Comes Mr. Jordan featuring one of my favorites, Claude Rains.  Afterward is the hilarious Heaven Can Wait with Don Ameche and Gene Tierney.  I'm trying to decide if I'm going to watch all these and watch something off the DVR at the conclusion of Heaven Can Wait or whether I'll watch something else when The Clock starts since I own that film and Suspicion.  I also have Heaven Can Wait.  But I love all the films being aired--except Here Comes Mr. Jordan.  I've never seen that film, so I don't have an opinion on it yet.  I have 200+ films to get through on the DVR too.  So many films. So little time.  Lol. 

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I also watched That's Entertainment II.  I agree it was fun to see more of MGM's best musical numbers, though it seemed that this segment seemed to focus a lot on MGM's stars in general and not specifically musical numbers.  I love seeing Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire together.  Many try to portray Kelly and Astaire as competitors with the inevitable comparisons, however, from what I've read about Kelly and Astaire and seen of them together, this couldn't be farther from the truth.  They seem like great friends and the two men's dancing styles are so different and innovative in different ways, that there is room for both performers in the upper echelons of the dancing world.

 

I'm not a big fan of Esther Williams (mainly because she strikes me as dull), but I will say that her water skiing routine from Easy to Love was pretty impressive and I wouldn't mind seeing that film if only to see how the elaborate routine fit in within the context of the plot.  (I keep getting Easy to Love mixed up with Easy to Wed, both star Esther Williams, but the latter film costars Lucille Ball).  

 

Right now I'm watching National Velvet.  I've never seen this film before.  I love seeing a young Angela Lansbury.  Mickey Rooney (whom I'm usually not into) is pretty good in this movie as the jaded jockey trying to help 12-year old Elizabeth Taylor groom a horse into a competitor.  While Taylor is good in this film, I much prefer her adult siren roles over her child roles.  She is a bit over dramatic for my tastes.  From the title, I always assumed that the horse's name was "Velvet."  It's interesting that it's Taylor's character's name.  Anne Revere and Donald Crisp are excellent as Taylor's parents.  I missed the beginning of this film because I was busy assembling a soup in my crockpot for dinner later tonight and missed the set up of the film.  I may need to watch later on Watch TCM or get the film via Netflix. 

 

TCM's programming today is on a roll.  Next up is The Clock, which I love.  After that is Suspicion, one of my favorite Hitchcock films and The Essential at 5pm is Here Comes Mr. Jordan featuring one of my favorites, Claude Rains.  Afterward is the hilarious Heaven Can Wait with Don Ameche and Gene Tierney.  I'm trying to decide if I'm going to watch all these and watch something off the DVR at the conclusion of Heaven Can Wait or whether I'll watch something else when The Clock starts since I own that film and Suspicion.  I also have Heaven Can Wait.  But I love all the films being aired--except Here Comes Mr. Jordan.  I've never seen that film, so I don't have an opinion on it yet.  I have 200+ films to get through on the DVR too.  So many films. So little time.  Lol. 

Everything well said here.  I was not a good fan of Esther WIlliams until I saw a Film Noir she was very good in as a schoolteacher stalked by a killer in The Unguarded Moment.   Though the swimming scenes are well done in other films and often artistic, I prefer a Film Noir or Comedy instead. 

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"That's Entertainment Part II" (1976)--Another nostalgia-fest from MGM. This time lesser known musicals & performers are celebrated ("The Great Waltz" (1938) with Miliza Korjus--lady wasn't much of an actress, but had a sweet soprano that was on-key; Bobby Van as a human pogo stick in "Small Town Girl"(1953),to name just two).

 

Film also celebrates Broadway performers before they became Stars ( Gwen Verdon in the Can-Can from 1952's "The Merry Widow"; TMW star Lana Turner can be glimpsed during cutaways from Verdon's number

 

Miliza Korjus was nominated for an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress for THE GREAT WALTZ the very first year the category was created in 1936. I don't think she had much of a follow-up career though.

 

Enter I also enjoyed the wonderfully shot scene featuring the pogo stick dancing from SMALL TOWN GIRL, a scene from which was featured prominently in the Uptown funk video I posted some weeks ago. You can also see Lana Turner in "the Merry Widow" on a billboard in the background of that number as well.

 

I was a little sad watching it though, because the small town backlot on which it was filmed was very likely sold off and auctioned by MGM in the 1960s.

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I saw Joseph Strick's film of James Joyce's Ulysses (1967) when it was released and again recently on YouTube. I think it's a fine film, a noble attempt to film a novel that has been called "unfilmable." The movie has a very special, evocative feel to it, conveyed partly by the black-and-white cinematography and the performances of Milo O'Shea, Barbara Jefford, Maurice Roeves, and T.P. McKenna. You can experience the feel of Dublin; and smell the flowers of Gibralter. It's a beautiful film.

 

Although The New York Times gave it a pretty good review when it was released (see below the image), Ulysses has been underrated in recent years. I think it's time that it was reevaluated and appreciated for what it is: an excellent movie and a noble attempt to film one of the most complex novels ever written.

 

ulysses_2180765k.jpg

 

http://www.nytimes.com/movie/review?res=9E07E5DD1F3BE63ABC4C52DFB566838C679EDE

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