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I saw Joseph Strick's film of James Joyce's Ulysses (1967) when it was released and again recently on YouTube. I think it's a fine film, a noble attempt to film a novel that has been called "unfilmable." The movie has a very special, evocative feel to it, conveyed partly by the black-and-white cinematography and the performances of Milo O'Shea, Barbara Jefford, Maurice Roeves, and T.P. McKenna. You can experience the feel of Dublin; and smell the flowers of Gibralter. It's a beautiful film.

 

Although The New York Times gave it a pretty good review when it was released (see below the image), Ulysses has been underrated in recent years. I think it's time that it was reevaluated and appreciated for what it is: an excellent movie and a noble attempt to film one of the most complex novels ever written.

 

ulysses_2180765k.jpg

 

http://www.nytimes.com/movie/review?res=9E07E5DD1F3BE63ABC4C52DFB566838C679EDE

That photo looks like it could be on the Dingle Peninsula on the west coast not far from Tralee.

The rocky island looks like a woman reclining.

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That photo looks like it could be on the Dingle Peninsula on the west coast not far from Tralee.

The rocky island looks like a woman reclining.

The film was shot on a very small budget, mostly around Dublin. I wonder if they did get to the country to film the seaside scenes. Here's a great piece about the film:

 

http://thequietus.com/articles/06434-bloomsday-special-joseph-strick-s-1967-adaptation-of-ulysses-19

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I saw Joseph Strick's film of James Joyce's Ulysses (1967) when it was released and again recently on YouTube. I think it's a fine film, a noble attempt to film a novel that has been called "unfilmable." The movie has a very special, evocative feel to it, conveyed partly by the black-and-white cinematography and the performances of Milo O'Shea, Barbara Jefford, Maurice Roeves, and T.P. McKenna. You can experience the feel of Dublin; and smell the flowers of Gibralter. It's a beautiful film.

 

Although The New York Times gave it a pretty good review when it was released (see below the image), Ulysses has been underrated in recent years. I think it's time that it was reevaluated and appreciated for what it is: an excellent movie and a noble attempt to film one of the most complex novels ever written.

 

 

 

They should try and air it on June 16th, eh , Swithin?

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After many years I finally caught up with Die! Die! My Darling! (1965) and was pleasantly surprised by how good it was.  Tallulah Bankhead, looking slightly like Trevor Howard in drag follows in the Joan/Bette Baby Jane tradition in this Hammer thriller.

The acting is top notch.  Stephanie Powers, Peter Vaughn and Yootha Joyce are all in keeping with the genre.  Tallulah is grand and she makes you wish she had made a few more films.

Donald Sutherland appears in one of his 'mentally challenged' roles.  Thank goodness he was able to break free of those.

I'd be interested to hear what other people thought of DDMD.  It exceeded my expectations.

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That 1970 Tv movie 'THE OTHER MAN' with Joan Hackett and Roy Thinnes sounds like an interesting movie.  With all of the made-for-television films that have been released on VHS or DVD or both there's still so many of them languishing unreleased to home video in any form you wonder if some of these tele-films have simply disintegrated.  

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--except Here Comes Mr. Jordan.  I've never seen that film, so I don't have an opinion on it yet.  

 

It's one of my very favorite movies, definitely my favorite Robert Montgomery role. I really like that Raines repeats, "everything's going to be all right". 

The remake HEAVEN CAN WAIT (do not confuse with the Ameche flick of same name) with Warren Beatty is surprisingly good except for Julie Christie in Evelyn Keyes role. You really see Keyes superiority as an actress when comparing the two.

 

I'd be interested to hear what other people thought of DDMD.  It exceeded my expectations.

 

OK Bogie, you've never steered me wrong-looking forward to seeing this!

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I'm watching In the Good Old Summertime

 

https://youtu.be/7lyv0k6hNxY?t=85

 

I like it and really enjoy Judy's singing and the scene at 1:25 in the above trailer but I really like the Jimmy Stewart version a bit more, The Shop Around the Corner

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xr3nsHRKZJA

 

The wife and I watched Suspicion and Here Comes Mr Jordan last night ... we wanted to back up Mr Jordan with Heaven Can Wait, the Beatty version, but I couldn't locate I'll find it and watch today though I think.

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Inside Out. 

 

Maybe a bit newer than the usual offerings here, and maybe a bit too much of a formula in plot development (especially the 2nd act), but the climax and ending were very satisfying.  It is good one for getting kids talking about brain function as well. 

 

I loved this movie.  My husband and I saw it in the theater on my birthday.  I thought it was a fun way to show how the mind works.  I thought that the emotions controlling the little girl's thoughts and emotions was very clever and how the memories made that day were short term, until they became longer lasting and were moved out to long term memory storage.  I also liked how the memories were color coded and how some memories were multiple colors, which is realistic seeing how a memory could be happy but sad as well.  My favorite emotion was disgust. The end when the little girl met the boy was funny.  

 

I'm looking forward to seeing the next Pixar offering, The Good Dinosaur.  

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Here Comes Mr. Jordan. I saw last night's "Essential."  I mostly watched it because I love Claude Rains.  He wasn't in this film as much as I had hoped, however, his role was very important to the plot.  I thought Robert Montgomery was excellent as Joe Pendleton.  I liked him better in this film than I did in Lady in the Lake.  Granted, they're two very different types of films, but I still preferred him in 'Mr. Jordan.' I also thought James Gleason provided excellent support as Mr. Corkle.  I don't know much about Evelyn Keyes only that she was in Gone with the Wind and was married to John Huston.  I thought she was very good as the woman who Montgomery has his eye on.  All in all, I thought this was an entertaining film.  I haven't seen the Warren Beatty or Chris Rock remakes, but I will have to imagine that some of the sparkle will be lost in the "new" versions.  3.5/4 stars.

 

A Hole in the Head.  I recorded this movie during the first Frank Sinatra night.  I mostly recorded it because of the cast: Sinatra, Edward G. Robinson, Eleanor Parker and Thelma Ritter.  Sinatra's role was typical, the single playboy type, except this time he has a child that he's responsible for.  I liked his crazy girlfriend, played by Carolyn "Morticia Addams"  Jones.  She's played Sinatra's girlfriend in a couple movies that I've seen.  I thought with Parker's third billing that she would have had a bigger role, but she was really only a supporting player.  Ritter's role was larger than Parker's.  I really like Parker and I'm happy that her films seem to air often on TCM.  Robinson was excellent per usual.  I loved the banter between him and Ritter. I love Ritter's portrayals.  Her characters are tough, but have a sensitive side.  She deserves more credit than she receives. I was surprised that this was a Frank Capra film, it had a different vibe than his prior efforts I've seen: It Happened One Night, Meet John Doe, and Arsenic and Old Lace.  Perhaps that is just a result of this film being from the late 1950s.  The ending of the film was a little schmaltzy but also bittersweet.  None of the characters are better off at the end of the film than they were at the beginning.  2.5/4 stars.

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Union City (1980) Jersey Noir
 
unioncity.jpg
 
Director: Marcus Reichert, based on a Cornell Woolrich (short story "The Corpse Next Door"), screenplay by Marcus Reichert. Cinematography is by Edward Lachman (The Limey 1999). The film stars Dennis Lipscomb, Debbie Harry, Sam McMurray, Irina Maleeva, Everett McGill (Twin Peaks), Tony Azito, and Pat Benatar.
 
This low budget film beautifully captures the darkness, obsession and overbearing despair, of Cornell Woolrich's depression era story updated to 1953.  The stylistically Noir cinematography, with chiaroscuro lighting, reflections, deep shadows and clashing color schemes enhance the foreboding atmosphere. 
 
The DVD from Fox Lorber is a poor indicator of the original film supposedly the Tartan DVD  is the superior release. None of the actors really stand out aside from Dennis Lipscomb who gives off a demented Jack Lemmon vibe. This is a must for Cornell Woolrich fans, entertaining but a 6/10. A fuller review in Film Noir/Gangster board under Recently Watched Noir

 

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Here Comes Mr. Jordan. I saw last night's "Essential."  I mostly watched it because I love Claude Rains.  He wasn't in this film as much as I had hoped, however, his role was very important to the plot.  I thought Robert Montgomery was excellent as Joe Pendleton.  I liked him better in this film than I did in Lady in the Lake.  Granted, they're two very different types of films, but I still preferred him in 'Mr. Jordan.' I also thought James Gleason provided excellent support as Mr. Corkle.  I don't know much about Evelyn Keyes only that she was in Gone with the Wind and was married to John Huston.  I thought she was very good as the woman who Montgomery has his eye on.  All in all, I thought this was an entertaining film.  I haven't seen the Warren Beatty or Chris Rock remakes, but I will have to imagine that some of the sparkle will be lost in the "new" versions.  3.5/4 stars.

 

A Hole in the Head.  I recorded this movie during the first Frank Sinatra night.  I mostly recorded it because of the cast: Sinatra, Edward G. Robinson, Eleanor Parker and Thelma Ritter.  Sinatra's role was typical, the single playboy type, except this time he has a child that he's responsible for.  I liked his crazy girlfriend, played by Carolyn "Morticia Addams"  Jones.  She's played Sinatra's girlfriend in a couple movies that I've seen.  I thought with Parker's third billing that she would have had a bigger role, but she was really only a supporting player.  Ritter's role was larger than Parker's.  I really like Parker and I'm happy that her films seem to air often on TCM.  Robinson was excellent per usual.  I loved the banter between him and Ritter. I love Ritter's portrayals.  Her characters are tough, but have a sensitive side.  She deserves more credit than she receives. I was surprised that this was a Frank Capra film, it had a different vibe than his prior efforts I've seen: It Happened One Night, Meet John Doe, and Arsenic and Old Lace.  Perhaps that is just a result of this film being from the late 1950s.  The ending of the film was a little schmaltzy but also bittersweet.  None of the characters are better off at the end of the film than they were at the beginning.  2.5/4 stars.

 

Evelyn Keyes did some fine work but since she spend much of her career as a Columbia contract player TCM doesn't show many of her films.    GET-TV has been featuring her the last few months and I was able to see many of her 40's Columbia films (2 with fellow Columbia star Glenn Ford).

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Cracked Nuts (1931)

 

This was my fourth Wheeler & Woolsey film, after becoming an instant fan with Rio Rita, then The Rainmakers and Half Shot at Sunrise. I've liked all their films so far. Their jokey, hokey vaudeville style somehow makes me laugh even (or maybe especially?) when the jokes are lame. The groaning is part of the enjoyment. As always, the happenings are extremely silly- this time with with W&W competing to be king of a small nation that is not so desirable to lead, and hilarity takes no prompting to ensue. Many old jokes that have been re-used mercilessly and no doubt pre-date Edwardian times; many dumb jokes that no one dared to use again; and sometimes even a good one, (my fave, "He's the most absent-minded man in the kingdom. Last week he put a cigarette to bed and threw himself out the window.") Dorothy Lee, who was great in Half Shot, is also in this one, to a lesser extent. She and Wheeler form the ultimate sticky-and-sweet-as-molasses couple. Edna May Oliver is the perfect foil to, well, just about everyone. Thoroughly enjoyed- especially when things turn violent, (Ah! Vaudeville violence- classic!)

 

(One question of credibility: Am I supposed to believe that, after Wheeler comes into a half million bucks, Woolsey would just part ways with him and wish him luck? Integral to the set-up, maybe, but highly unlikely.)

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Evelyn Keyes did some fine work but since she spend much of her career as a Columbia contract player TCM doesn't show many of her films.    GET-TV has been featuring her the last few months and I was able to see many of her 40's Columbia films (2 with fellow Columbia star Glenn Ford).

 

I thought she was very good in The Prowler (1951), which was on fairly recently. She does a fine impression of Al Jolson, too.

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I thought she was very good in The Prowler (1951), which was on fairly recently. She does a fine impression of Al Jolson, too.

 

Yea,  The Prowler is a nice noir film with a fine performance from Keyes as well as Van Heflin in a leading man role.

 

Keyes was in the some solid noir \ crime films like 99 River Street with John Payne, Johnny O'clock with Dick Powell and The Killer that Stalked New York with Dorothy Malone.

 

The two Ford \ Keyes films Mr. Soft Touch, and the Matting of Millie are worth seeing (Keyes does well at comedy in Millie).

 

She was also fine in the Ida Lupino gothic "light noir" drama Ladies in Retirement.  

 

TCM recently showed Ladies in Retirement as well as her noir films but the United Artist low budget films she was in TCM tends not to showcase.

 

 

 

,

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Everything well said here. I was not a good fan of Esther WIlliams until I saw a Film Noir she was very good in as a schoolteacher stalked by a killer in The Unguarded Moment. Though the swimming scenes are well done in other films and often artistic, I prefer a Film Noir or Comedy instead.

I'd really like to see THE UNGUARDED MOMENT. The synopsis sounds very interesting, and did you know it was based on a short story Rosalind Russell wrote for herself while at Warner Brothers?

 

By the time the story was ready to be produced Roz was considered too old for the part and it went to Esther Williams.

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Oh yeah, and I watched The House by The Cemetery (1984) last night. That must have been the worst bat attack scene I ever saw.

 

Oh yeah, and I watched The House by The Cemetery (1984) last night. That must have been the worst bat attack scene I ever saw.

been disappointed with last 2 Italian horror flicks on UNDERGROUND :(

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been disappointed with last 2 Italian horror flicks on UNDERGROUND :(

If you mean SHOCK and HOUSE BY THE CEMETERY, yeah, neither are classics. I'd recommend them for completists only, even though they both have their moments. As far as late 70's/early 80's italo-horror, DEEP RED, SUSPIRIA, TENEBRAE, ZOMBI 2, THE BEYOND, CITY OF THE LIVING DEAD, and to a lesser extent, INFERNO and NEW YORK RIPPER, are your best bets. They can be an acquired taste, with outrageous violence, sometimes nauseating gore effects, bizarre storylines that lurch dangerously close to incoherence, and distinctive music that is dated but intrinsic to the films' unique charms. I enjoy the titles I listed a great deal while acknowledging their deep flaws, which for some viewers are dealbreakers. Proceed at your own risk!

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Apartment for Peggy (1948).  About the postwar housing crisis affecting the US Veteran students and their brides, also a painful look at the post-retirement of a man alone.  Filming took place around the University of Nevada at Reno; that location was to be a stand-in for movie's story locale of U of Illinois or Wisconsin. U of Nevada-Reno also the location for another fictional Midwestern college movie, Margie.

 

Very interesting, and such a fascinating time.

 

Attic+apartment+for+peggy.JPG

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Apartment for Peggy (1948).  About the postwar housing crisis affecting the US Veteran students and their brides, also a painful look at the post-retirement of a man alone.  Filming took place around the University of Nevada at Reno; that location was to be a stand-in for movie's story locale of U of Illinois or Wisconsin. U of Nevada-Reno also the location for another fictional Midwestern college movie, Margie.

 

Very interesting, and such a fascinating time.

 

Attic+apartment+for+peggy.JPG

Very good film.  I like this one too.  Jeanne Crain and the others were really good in this film.

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I'd really like to see THE UNGUARDED MOMENT. The synopsis sounds very interesting, and did you know it was based on a short story Rosalind Russell wrote for herself while at Warner Brothers?

 

By the time the story was ready to be produced Roz was considered too old for the part and it went to Esther Williams.

You will like Unguarded Moment with such a shocking plot twist!  That is very interesting about Rosalind Russell writing the story.  A few years earlier she would have been very good in it too.

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