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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

SWEET SMELL...However, is a film that I have seen a handful of times and I just absolutely can’t stand it. I think Tony Curtis is completely brilliant, probably should’ve gotten an Oscar nomination for it. But outside of that I can’t stand it.

If you don't tune to it, you don't tune to it.

What it has (Sweet Smell...) for me is also a nostalgia ingredient in the formula, I as a small kid imprinted on that New York, I crossed that bridge many times, the street with Bogard's was on 59th Street just a couple of storefronts up from where a friends brother had a waterbed store in the 60s. That whole New York is not there now but it was on it's last crumbling legs in 1957 and some of the ruins are still around today, if you know where to look. If you don't tune strongly to that particular ingredient it may not click. That NYC was on TV, Toots Shor's and 21 Club were talked about on The Ed Sullivan Show, or later Johnny Carson. Add that to the of the slimy tabloid journalism/promotion business and it's accompanying Zeitgeist, and the great acting of Curtis and Lancaster.

For me the Noir films have to have a good story, good locations, great characters, good cinematography, good sound/music and good actors. Some time the shear weight of one of those parts can buoy up where a film is lacking in others. The Crooked Way has great cinematography good locations/sets, OK actors, good story, and I don't remember much about the sound or music. Which maybe back then wasn't the point on a "B" picture, mostly studio mill music, but then somebody figured a soundtrack tie in. now the music is a more potent ingredient. Just think if they could have used say Chuck Berry's "Maybellene" (1955) as diegetic music blaring over a car radio during a chase scene in any late fifties Noir, or just real popular music playing in the background.

Some Noirs actually have great enough sound design that you actually notice it as an extra dimension.

Some times the actors and the script are so good that the whole film can take place in a few rather uninteresting sets. like say the you've seen it a billion times Hollywood Hotel Room in The Maltese Falcon.  

Some you tune to some you don't

 

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

That was an exceptional review of SWEET SWEETBACK, Joe.

The only thing I can think to add is that if you haven’t read them all already, youd probably really dig the novels of CHESTER HIMES.

SWEET SMELL...However, is a film that I have seen a handful of times and I just absolutely can’t stand it. I think Tony Curtis is completely brilliant, probably should’ve gotten an Oscar nomination for it. But outside of that I can’t stand it.

I liked Sweet Smell of Success, I agree re: Tony Curtis.  One of my favorite things about the film is the overall aesthetic of it and the music!

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Tiger Bay (1959) - British crime drama from the Rank Organization and director J. Lee Thompson. Hayley Mills stars as Gillie, a lonely little girl being raised by her maiden aunt (Megs Jenkins). Gillie witnesses a murder in her apartment building, but her pathological lying makes her a dubious resource for police Superintendent Graham (John Mills), and Gillie would rather befriend the murderer (Horst Buchholz) than turn him in. Also featuring Anthony Dawson, George Selway, Shari, Kenneth Griffith, and Yvonne Mitchell.

This was young Mills' first major role and she's outstanding as a complicated child looking to make an emotional connection with anyone that will allow her. Her scenes with Buchholz are especially well-played. An excellent production all around.   (7/10)

Source: FilmStruck

tiger_bay_poster.jpg

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36 minutes ago, scsu1975 said:

But apparently he wanted Jack Buetel to wear it.

Jane Russell wrote in her autobiography that the Hughes bra was very uncomfortable. So she took it off, put on her own bra with some extra padding and Hughes, thinking it was his own designed bra for her, was satisfied with the result.

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The Trap (1959) - Crime thriller from Paramount Pictures and director Norman Panama. Attorney Ralph Anderson (Richard Widmark) is forced by wanted gangster Victor Massonetti (Lee J. Cobb) to secure an escape route at an aircraft runway in Ralph's small hometown out in the desert. Ralph's father is the sheriff, and Ralph's brother Tippy (Earl Holliman) is an alcoholic deputy married to Linda (Tina Louise), Ralph's former girlfriend who's still holding a torch for him. When these volatile characters meet up, things go south quickly, and many find themselves on the run and struggling to stay alive. Also featuring Carl Benton Reid, Peter Baldwin, Chuck Wassil, Richard Shannon, James Bell, and Lorne Greene.

This sun-baked color thriller was entertaining if not terribly original. The performances are fine, and Cobb manages to play it a little lower than usual. A lot of Louise's dialogue sounds looped.    (7/10)

Source: Amazon video

8ee9876b8da0731e108c2259d46e39f0--classi

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5 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

If you don't tune to it, you don't tune to it.

What it has (Sweet Smell...) for me is also a nostalgia ingredient in the formula, I as a small kid imprinted on that New York, I crossed that bridge many times, the street with Bogard's was on 59th Street just a couple of storefronts up from where a friends brother had a waterbed store in the 60s. That whole New York is not there now but it was on it's last crumbling legs in 1957 and some of the ruins are still around today, if you know where to look. If you don't tune strongly to that particular ingredient it may not click. That NYC was on TV, Toots Shor's and 21 Club were talked about on The Ed Sullivan Show, or later Johnny Carson. Add that to the of the slimy tabloid journalism/promotion business and it's accompanying Zeitgeist, and the great acting of Curtis and Lancaster.

For me the Noir films have to have a good story, good locations, great characters, good cinematography, good sound/music and good actors. Some time the shear weight of one of those parts can buoy up where a film is lacking in others. The Crooked Way has great cinematography good locations/sets, OK actors, good story, and I don't remember much about the sound or music. Which maybe back then wasn't the point on a "B" picture, mostly studio mill music, but then somebody figured a soundtrack tie in. now the music is a more potent ingredient. Just think if they could have used say Chuck Berry's "Maybellene" (1955) as diegetic music blaring over a car radio during a chase scene in any late fifties Noir, or just real popular music playing in the background.

Some Noirs actually have great enough sound design that you actually notice it as an extra dimension.

Some times the actors and the script are so good that the whole film can take place in a few rather uninteresting sets. like say the you've seen it a billion times Hollywood Hotel Room in The Maltese Falcon.  

Some you tune to some you don't

 

I think what makes this film more compelling to some, is if they are cognescent of the cutthroat areas of entertainment that existed back then with people like Walter Winchell controlling certain areas of the industry and then it makes a lot more sense, with its dour and most snide and sordid aspects. I can see why it might turn off some people but for me, Lancaster was never more brilliant and Curtis is great too. 

I think the films of Alexander MacKendrick [spelling this without looking it up!] are a sophisticated bunch and very impressive.

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

Jane Russell wrote in her autobiography that the Hughes bra was very uncomfortable. So she took it off, put on her own bra with some extra padding and Hughes, thinking it was his own designed bra for her, was satisfied with the result.

Apropos of nothing, here is a shot of a screen test with Beutel. The young lady is Leatrice Joy Gilbert, daughter of Leatrice Joy and John Gilbert. I wonder if that is Howard Hughes standing directly in front of the camera, thinking  "you're gonna need a bigger bra."

FPjLNJu.png

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28 minutes ago, scsu1975 said:

Apropos of nothing, here is a shot of a screen test with Beutel. The young lady is Leatrice Joy Gilbert, daughter of Leatrice Joy and John Gilbert. I wonder if that is Howard Hughes standing directly in front of the camera, thinking  "you're gonna need a bigger bra."

FPjLNJu.png

That man is Howard Hawks.

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2 hours ago, Hibi said:

LOL. I dont know who was the worst actor in this. Buetel or Russell.

Let's face it, it couldn't have been easy for a young actor being directed by a "madman" like his lover, Howard Hughes.

Hughes micro-managed everything in Buetel's life, even his daily diet.

Hughes was convinced that Buetel's "precious fluids" would turn him into a powerful lover.

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Two Men in Manhattan (1959) - French noir mystery from Gaumont and writer-director Jean-Pierre Melville. Melville also stars as Moreau, a French reporter in NYC who is tasked one night with finding a missing French United Nations diplomat. Moreau enlists the aid of Delmas (Pierre Grasset), a fellow Frenchman and news photographer with a knowledge of Manhattan's seedier nightspots. Also featuring Christiane Eudes, Ginger Hall, Colette Fleury, Monique Hennessy, Glenda Leigh, Jean Darcante, and Michele Bailly.

This low budget effort has cool, jazzy atmosphere to spare. The characters move about the city from Broadway to a cheap stripclub to a smoky jazz bar to Times Square in all of its neon glory. There's quite a bit of NYC location cinematography, and a loose, cynical story that more than makes up for the occasional amateurish performance or cheap set. Melville reminded me a bit of a cleaned up Paul Giamatti.   (7/10)

Source: FilmStruck

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"Love, Cheat and Steal" - William Curran - 1993 - John Lithgow, Eric Roberts and Madchen Amick -

It's a noir film - neo-noir, I guess - of the darkest, deadliest hue -

It's the story of a "mad man" - Eric Roberts in a magnificent performance - who busts out of jail with a friend in order to get even with the woman who done him wrong -

the plot is full of twists and turns -

SO, it would be unfair to give any of it away -

Eric Roberts has to be on his toes, so does the woman who done him wrong, Madchen Amick and so does the man that she has married, John Lithgow - 

suffice it to say, the ending will knock your socks off -

but why, oh, WHY, isn't this film better-known?

MV5BYTA4YTdkZTUtMmIyNC00NzMwLTg1MDEtYzBm

third+day01.jpg

 

 

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THE EDGE (1997) Score: 1/5 

Starring: Alec Baldwin, Anthony Hopkins, Elle Macpherson, Harold Perrineau. 

After my dad recommended this one to me, I decided to give it a try. Let's just say: I'm going to be screening his future recommendations more carefully. It honestly wasn't that good. I thought it was rather dull. It wasn't even all that interesting when the bear showed up, to be honest. I only watched this for Alec Baldwin, since I'm slightly in love with him. 

Image result for the edge 1997

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A SIMPLE FAVOR (2018) Score: 3/5 

Starring: Anna Kendrick, Blake Lively, Andrew Rannells, Henry Golding, Ian Ho, Joshua Satine, Kelly McCormack. 

This is a modern murder mystery story that I quickly figured out (You don't read every Agatha Christie book and come away with nothing). There was a surprising amount of humor in this one. I am a fan of Anna Kendrick's; she was quite funny in this (the audience kept laughing at a lot of the things she said). Side note: Anna was also nominated for a Supporting Tony award for the Broadway musical, "High Society" back in the late 1990s, at the age of like, 12. Little bit of trivia for you all. 

Essentially, Stephanie (Kendrick)'s friend, Emily, disappears and no one has any clue where she is (she's a very private person who no one really knows much about, not even her husband). 

Image result for a simple favor

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Up Periscope (1959) - WW2 submarine action from Warner Brothers and director Gordon Douglas. James Garner stars as US Navy Lt. Kenneth Braden, a demolitions expert assigned to join a submarine crew led by the ill-tempered Commander Stevenson (Edmond O'Brien). Braden and the crew bond as they make the treacherous journey to the island where Braden's demolition mission is located. Also featuring Alan Hale Jr., Carleton Carpenter, Andra Martin, Frank Gifford, William Leslie, Richard Bakalyan, Edd Byrnes, and Warren Oates in his film debut.

Most submarine films follow the same formula and this one isn't any different. There's a lot of sweaty fear and cramped quarters, a couple of comic relief characters, and a minor personality conflict between the two leads to overcome. The acting is adequate, and fans of Garner will like seeing him traipsing around in a swimsuit. I watched this for Warren Oates' debut, and while his uncredited bit as one of the sailors is very minor, he still makes an impression as he's either eating or drinking in every scene that he's in.   (6/10)

Source: TCM

31852_1_front.jpg

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12 hours ago, rayban said:

"Love, Cheat and Steal" - William Curran - 1993 - John Lithgow, Eric Roberts and Madchen Amick -

It's a noir film - neo-noir, I guess - of the darkest, deadliest hue -

It's the story of a "mad man" - Eric Roberts in a magnificent performance - who busts out of jail with a friend in order to get even with the woman who done him wrong -

the plot is full of twists and turns -

SO, it would be unfair to give any of it away -

Eric Roberts has to be on his toes, so does the woman who done him wrong, Madchen Amick and so does the man that she has married, John Lithgow - 

suffice it to say, the ending will knock your socks off -

but why, oh, WHY, isn't this film better-known?

MV5BYTA4YTdkZTUtMmIyNC00NzMwLTg1MDEtYzBm

third+day01.jpg

 

Good question, I've never heard of it. But I see I can watch it, thanks for the rec.

And speaking of "WHY, isn't this film better-known?" check out from the same year The Wrong Man another great Neo Noir also with Lithgow, Rosanna Arquette, and Kevin Anderson, it's one of my top ten Neo Noirs of the 1990s and also little known.

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14 hours ago, rayban said:

Let's face it, it couldn't have been easy for a young actor being directed by a "madman" like his lover, Howard Hughes.

Hughes micro-managed everything in Buetel's life, even his daily diet.

Hughes was convinced that Buetel's "precious fluids" would turn him into a powerful lover.

LOL. Where do you get all this info?

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15 hours ago, rayban said:

"Love, Cheat and Steal" - William Curran - 1993 - John Lithgow, Eric Roberts and Madchen Amick -

It's a noir film - neo-noir, I guess - of the darkest, deadliest hue -

It's the story of a "mad man" - Eric Roberts in a magnificent performance - who busts out of jail with a friend in order to get even with the woman who done him wrong -

the plot is full of twists and turns -

SO, it would be unfair to give any of it away -

Eric Roberts has to be on his toes, so does the woman who done him wrong, Madchen Amick and so does the man that she has married, John Lithgow - 

suffice it to say, the ending will knock your socks off -

but why, oh, WHY, isn't this film better-known?

MV5BYTA4YTdkZTUtMmIyNC00NzMwLTg1MDEtYzBm

third+day01.jpg

 

 

Yea it was good but it had a up ending. Check out The Wrong Man (1993), everybody loses.

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Hillsborough - British documentary from Daniel Gordon about the Hillsborough Disaster where 90 Liverpool sports fans were crushed to death inside of a soccer stadium. It follows how the police tried to deflect blame by painting the victims as all drunken hooligans while the survivors blame lack of effective monitoring from the police who allowed fans to swarm in through the gates and crush the people in front against the fence. This documentary includes many interviews from survivors, policemen and relatives of victims who died of asphyxiation that day. This was a very sad documentary and hearing the mother talk about her dead child was the saddest part. I give this one an 8/10 for good production values and interesting interviews that help go over the incident and the government corruption that followed afterward.

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The World of Apu aka Apur Sansar (1959) - Indian drama, the third part of a trilogy, from writer-producer-director Satyajit Ray. Apu is now a grown man (Soumitra Chatterjee), an aspiring novelist struggling to pay his rent but enjoying life nonetheless. He gets invited to a wedding by his friend Pulu (Swapan Mukherjee), and they travel to Pulu's small countryside hometown, leading to Apu's life changing forever in very unexpected ways. Also featuring Sharmila Tagore and Alok Chakravarty.

Ray manages to close out his trilogy with another outstanding film that runs the emotional gamut from joy to tragedy. The two leads (Chatterjee and Tagore) are both very good, and Tagore's performance is even more noteworthy when you learn that she was only 14 at the time. There are some beautiful, scenic shots, and the dichotomy of urban and rural Indian life is well depicted. Recommended.   (8/10)

Source: Criterion Blu-ray

worldofapu1959_96277_678x380_06302014015

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