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"The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone" - Jose Quintero - 1961 -

When her wealthy, older husband dies, an aging actress (Vivien Leigh) decides to retire and move to Rome.

For some strange reason, she finds herself at a loss.

She seems to have no interests - no hobbies.

She becomes "fixated" on having sex with young men.

She is introduced to a "candidate" (Warren Beatty) by a procurer, Lotte Lenya.

But Mrs. Stone (Vivien Leigh) is somewhat reluctant to begin a "liasion".

Eventually, she succumbes to his obvious charms.

But their relationship is skin-deep - she provides the money, he provides the sex.

Meanwhile, a filthy street urchin (Jeremy Spenser) has been following her.

He is hoping to capture her attentions.

"What do you want?", she cries out.

Eventually, Mrs. Stone loses her "boy-toy" - he becomes attracted to a much younger woman.

And Mrs. Stone falls into the arms of the filthy street urchin.

The film, which has many fine and memorable moments, is dominated - and weakened - by the parched performamce of Vivien Leigh, who seems to be struggling for air.

When she falls into the arms of Jeremy Spenser, you just know that the end is not far off.

The film is basically a hard-hitting testimony to the inescapable fact that love for sale is not an beneficial enterprise for anyone - the buyer or the seller

Lotte Lenya's formidable, terrifying performance captures the forbidding soul of this movie.3546832719_53af4ea7c0_o.png

082bcc38e1d4d9e0ce68002c9a6d09e9.jpg

 


 

 

 

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For All Mankind (1989) - Documentary from director Al Reinert. The film is a compilation of footage shot during the various Apollo space missions, with narrated comments from the astronauts themselves. The movie shows the pre-flight preparation, the takeoff, Earth orbit (including a spacewalk), the final approach, and the moon landings, including surface exploration. The footage is extraordinary, and the music from Brian Eno, among others, adds to the atmosphere. I was a wannabe-astronaut as a kid like so many others around here (I live just a few hours drive from Cape Canaveral), and I still find the imagery breathtaking. The movie was nominated for the Best Documentary Feature Oscar. Recommended.   (8/10)

Source: FilmStruck

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1 hour ago, rayban said:

"The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone" - Jose Quintero - 1961 -

When her wealthy, older husband dies, an aging actress (Vivien Leigh) decides to retire and move to Rome.

For some strange reason, she finds herself at a loss.

She seems to have no interests - no hobbies.

She becomes "fixated" on having sex with young men.

She is introduced to a "candidate" (Warren Beatty) by a procurer, Lotte Lenya.

But Mrs. Stone (Vivien Leigh) is somewhat reluctant to begin a "liasion".

Eventually, she succumbes to his obvious charms.

But their relationship is skin-deep - she provides the money, he provides the sex.

Meanwhile, a filthy street urchin (Jeremy Spenser) has been following her.

He is hoping to capture her attentions.

"What do you want?", she cries out.

Eventually, Mrs. Stone loses her "boy-toy" - he becomes attracted to a much younger woman.

And Mrs. Stone falls into the arms of the filthy street urchin.

The film, which has many fine and memorable moments, is dominated - and weakened - by the parched performamce of Vivien Leigh, who seems to be struggling for air.

When she falls into the arms of Jeremy Spenser, you just know that the end is not far off.

The film is basically a hard-hitting testimony to the inescapable fact that love for sale is not an beneficial enterprise for anyone - the buyer or the seller

Lotte Lenya's formidable, terrifying performance captures the forbidding soul of this movie.3546832719_53af4ea7c0_o.png

082bcc38e1d4d9e0ce68002c9a6d09e9.jpg

 


 

 

 

Love this movie and you are right, Lotte Lenya steals the show.
 

Fabulous exegesis, Rayban!

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59 minutes ago, CaveGirl said:

Love this movie and you are right, Lotte Lenya steals the show.
 

Fabulous exegesis, Rayban!

I just wish that the film had a better reputation.

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1 hour ago, rayban said:

"The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone" - Jose Quintero - 1961 -

When her wealthy, older husband dies, an aging actress (Vivien Leigh) decides to retire and move to Rome.

For some strange reason, she finds herself at a loss.

She seems to have no interests - no hobbies.

She becomes "fixated" on having sex with young men.

She is introduced to a "candidate" (Warren Beatty) by a procurer, Lotte Lenya.

But Mrs. Stone (Vivien Leigh) is somewhat reluctant to begin a "liasion".

Eventually, she succumbes to his obvious charms.

But their relationship is skin-deep - she provides the money, he provides the sex.

Meanwhile, a filthy street urchin (Jeremy Spenser) has been following her.

He is hoping to capture her attentions.

"What do you want?", she cries out.

Eventually, Mrs. Stone loses her "boy-toy" - he becomes attracted to a much younger woman.

And Mrs. Stone falls into the arms of the filthy street urchin.

The film, which has many fine and memorable moments, is dominated - and weakened - by the parched performamce of Vivien Leigh, who seems to be struggling for air.

When she falls into the arms of Jeremy Spenser, you just know that the end is not far off.

The film is basically a hard-hitting testimony to the inescapable fact that love for sale is not an beneficial enterprise for anyone - the buyer or the seller

Lotte Lenya's formidable, terrifying performance captures the forbidding soul of this movi
 

 

 

Sorry to repost your entire review here, I tried to selectively edit it but I am posting with my phone and that is friggin impossible. Great review, I especially like the lyrical style – if I may differ at one point though, I think Vivien Leigh is absolutely fantastic in the part. She’s a member of the very small club of performers who won two Oscars and were nominated only twice, but it’s a shame that a lot of her great performances came in terrific years for women. If 1961 had not been such an outstanding year for the actresses in leading roles, I think she absolutely should and would have gotten a best actress nomination for this. She made so few films, I kind of wish she had been nominated more, it might’ve actually encouraged her to work more often

Sorry this is an awkwardly worded post, I super hate posting with my phone

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There was a cable TV presentation of "The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone" with Helen Mirren.

It was far more explicit than the film.

We saw Helen Mirren in action with Oliver Martinez.

And we saw in explicit detail what the street urchin was offering Mrs. Stone.

But I am not sure that it was any better.

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11 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Sorry to repost your entire review here, I tried to selectively edit it but I am posting with my phone and that is friggin impossible. Great review, I especially like the lyrical style – if I may differ at one point though, I think Vivien Leigh is absolutely fantastic in the part. She’s a member of the very small club of performers who won two Oscars and were nominated only twice, but it’s a shame that a lot of her great performances came in terrific years for women. If 1961 had not been such an outstanding year for the actresses in leading roles, I think she absolutely should and would have gotten a best actress nomination for this. She made so few films, I kind of wish she had been nominated more, it might’ve actually encouraged her to work more often

Sorry this is an awkwardly worded post, I super hate posting with my phone

Vivien Leigh's performance perplexes me.

She's obviously a woman at the end of - her rope, her life?

She might've intended every minute of it.

She seems very "contained", very "correct".

Maybe she was trying to escape the dire effects of what her character was going through.

She had to realize that life with Paolo (Beatty) would demean and degrade her.

   
 

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10 minutes ago, rayban said:

Vivien Leigh's performance perplexes me.

She's obviously a woman at the end of - her rope, her life?

She might've intended every minute of it.

She seems very "contained", very "correct".

Maybe she was trying to escape the dire effects of what her character was going through.

She had to realize that life with Paolo (Beatty) would demean and degrade her.

   
 

I remember reading somewhere that Vivien Leigh and Warren Beatty actually got on extremely well during filming, which was unusual because Beatty had a reputation for being very difficult and aloof. 

She actually was rather maternal towards him.

Apparently he brought his then girlfriend Joan Collins to the set and on meeting her Viv turned to Warren  and said “oh no darling, too common.”

 

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4 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I think it was within six or seven years of making MRS STONE that Vivien Leigh died.

Vivien Leigh was 47 years old at the time of filming.

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20 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I remember reading somewhere that Vivien Leigh and Warren Beatty actually got on extremely well during filming, which was unusual because Beatty had a reputation for being very difficult and aloof. 

She actually was rather maternal towards him.

Apparently he brought his then girlfriend Joan Collins to the set and on meeting her Viv turned to Warren  and said “oh no darling, too common.”

 

Viv certainly had taste!

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21 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I think it was within six or seven years of making MRS STONE that Vivien Leigh died.

edit- Joan Collins was probably delighted

I think Vivien Leigh had tuberculosis and was in complete denial and refused to have it treated, thus her early death.

P.S. What is it about Tennessee Williams and his material that are just so depressing you want to hang yourself after watching filmed versions? Or am I alone in this sentiment?

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3 minutes ago, calvinnme said:

I think Vivien Leigh had tuberculosis and was in complete denial and refused to have it treated, thus her early death.

Yes, She also smoked like a chimney – you can tell it from her voice in her later films.She also suffered from what I think we would now called bipolar disorder, which I can personally testify adds enough stress to your life to shorten it.

Some people were not meant to be on this earth for long, and I think Vivien was one of them- But oh did she ever make an impression in the earthly time she had.

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Sherlock Holmes (1916) - Silent adaptation of the mystery play based on Arthur Conan Doyle's works, from Essanay Films and director Arthur Berthelet. William Gillette stars as Holmes, who, along with Dr. Watson (Edward Fielding), gets involved in a case concerning some love letters between a crown prince and a girl who committed suicide. The girl's sister Alice (Marjorie Kay) is in possession of the letters, and she has to contend with agents of the prince, as well as a gang of blackmailers, including Holmes' arch-nemesis Moriarty (Ernest Maupain). Also featuring Stewart Robbins, Hugh Thompson, Ludwig Kreiss, Mario Majeroni, Grace Reals, and Fred Malatesta as "Lightfoot McTague".

Gillette also wrote the play upon which the film was based. In fact, Gillette had been playing Holmes on stage since 1899, and was considered the definitive Holmes by a generation who saw him. This early film isn't much more than a filmed record of the play, although there are a few attempts to "open up" the action. This was a lengthy movie for its time, and was also released in serial format. It drags more than a bit, and most modern audiences won't be able to stay awake through it, but I thought it was marginally adequate for its time.   (6/10)

Source: TCM

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1 hour ago, CaveGirl said:

Love this movie and you are right, Lotte Lenya steals the show.
 

Fabulous exegesis, Rayban!

I've never seen the whole film just bits and pieces, but you can see how much cinema was changing and quickly in the 60s. No wonder you have a large contingent here that wants to stay safely in the 40 and 50s. They were starting to push that bubble.

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59 minutes ago, rayban said:

There was a cable TV presentation of "The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone" with Helen Mirren.

It must have been cable, no?

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40 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

I've never seen the whole film just bits and pieces, but you can see how much cinema was changing and quickly in the 60s. No wonder you have a large contingent here that wants to stay safely in the 40 and 50s. They were starting to push that bubble.

I particularly like that movie as it has Ernest Thesinger in it, and I so enjoy seeing him in his later vestiges. Of course, he looked ancient even back in the 1930's, but that skeletal facial look, is always in fashion, just like Tom Petty.

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46 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Sherlock Holmes (1916) -

It drags more than a bit, and most modern audiences won't be able to stay awake through it, 

 

Probably an understatement :)

Aside from the novelty of seeing Gillette in his only film appearance, this movie is pretty dull. There are also some odd scenes where the cast members appear to "freeze," then we get a closeup and the "action" continues. This was very off-putting.

Maude Fealy, a beautiful actress of the silent era, was in the play. It's unfortunate she wasn't cast in the film, as very little of her work exists.

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Pretty Ladies (1925) - Silent romance from MGM and director Monta Bell. Zasu Pitts stars as Maggey Keenan, a comedy star in a Follies revue show. She leaves the audiences in stitches, but she's totally alone off-stage, forced to watch as all of the "pretty ladies" in the chorus leave with rich and handsome men each night. She eventually begins a romance with musician (Tom Moore) in the orchestra, but jealous stage diva Selma (Lilyan Tashman) sets out to break them up. Also featuring Ann Pennington, Bernard Randall, Helena D'Algy, George K. Arthur, Roy D'Arcy, Conrad Nagel, Norma Shearer, and Joan Crawford in her official movie debut.

I liked this silent comedy-drama, despite some drawbacks to the presentation I watched. Pitts is funny, appealing and sympathetic in the lead, and even pulls off wearing a fly costume. Crawford is noticeable in several scenes as one of the showgirls. Nagel's brief role is amusing, playing Pitts' imaginary "Dream Man". There's a lot of racy stuff in this, too. Just check out these lyrics to Pitts' opening song, which she sings while sitting on a block of ice:

"It's awful cold, awful cold

in the regions where I sit.

I'm wearing fur-lined BVD's,

Lest my terminal get frost-bit!

I want a man,

Anyone at all!

To kiss me, and miss me -

To beat me, and cheat me -

I WANT A MAN!"

For some inexplicable reason, this has a 2.5/10 IMDb score, with over 60 people rating it a 1/10. It must be an instance of "troll voting", because I found the movie enjoyable.    (7/10)

Source: Rarefilmm.com. The copy available appears to have been recorded off of a private projection screening, with attendant flickering of the backlight. There is also no music or score of any kind, and in fact, the ambient background noise of the room where this was recorded is clearly heard, including a chair moving, and someone knocking on a door. 

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

I've never seen the whole film just bits and pieces, but you can see how much cinema was changing and quickly in the 60s. No wonder you have a large contingent here that wants to stay safely in the 40 and 50s. They were starting to push that bubble.

In my case, I like everything up to the 50s, but I would just as soon skip the 60s and go straight to the 70s where you are completely past the production code era. The 60s tried to have it both ways. Take "Sunday in New York" for example.

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The Ape (1940) 5/10

I'm not sure what I would have named this film, but I think that ultimately "The Ape" is somewhat misleading. It was probably named as it was to bring in crowds - thoughts of an ape gone rogue and Boris Karloff would do so in 1940. Dr. Bernard Adrian (Karloff) is introduced immediately. He is visiting a girl who is paralyzed, Frances, on what would have been Adrian's daughter's 18th birthday. Both his daughter and wife were lost in an epidemic of what is called "paralysis". It is probably polio, but the disease is never named. The girl is like a second daughter to Adrian, and she has a beau, the rather simple but kindly Danny.

A local circus goes up in flames and an ape belonging to the circus is on the loose. The ape badly injures his cruel trainer/keeper in the process of escaping and the trainer is brought to Dr. Adrian. Adrian figures the man is going to die anyways, and uses his spinal fluid in a serum he is concocting to help Frances and other paralytics walk again.

There are several mysteries going on here. The ape only seems to kill people who are evil - you are given a scene in which each of his victims does something awful. How does the ape know? Plus the ape is hanging around the doctor's house. Why?? Also, in one scene the ape is said to be killed but is shown walking about later, still on a mad spree. How?

Is this all just bad editing? Why are chronically ill young people always shown as so patient and kind in these B films? Will the doctor push the boundaries of medicine too far and have Frances remove the blanket on her legs to reveal hairy ape legs? If so will Danny make a run for it? Watch and find out the ridiculous ending.

This film is five out of ten just because of Karloff. He creeps up the atmosphere and adds depth to just about any character he plays. Everybody else in the cast is just a cardboard cutout next to him. It makes me wonder why he even did this film. Probably for Karloff completists only.

Source: An old recording from a viewing on TCM

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16 minutes ago, calvinnme said:

In my case, I like everything up to the 50s, but I would just as soon skip the 60s and go straight to the 70s where you are completely past the production code era. The 60s tried to have it both ways. Take "Sunday in New York" for example.

For the 60s you have to check out the so called "Exploitation" films they were out there on the cutting edge of it. The studio stuff is as you say conflicted.

Like I mentioned in another thread, if you were a horse living in a fenced pasture and finally someone removed the fence rails you likely are going to exploit that freedom.

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