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speedracer5

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4 hours ago, hamradio said:

Forgot about last night.

:o:(

"Unspeakable Crime: The Killing of Jessica Chambers."

https://www.oxygen.com/unspeakable-crime-the-killing-of-jessica-chambers/videos

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You know I had the inkling that you spotlighted this on here because either the perpetrator was either an illegal immigrant or Black. 

Nice job.... You didn't disappoint....

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"Criminal Lawyer" - Christy Cabanne - 1937 -

This film is about the redemption of a man - he's a lawyer, he works for a racketeer, he gets appointed District Attorney (through his girlfriend's connections (?!) and he becomes a better human being - 

the film has a lot of wildness - Brandon, the lawyer, (Lee Tracy) gets a girl (Margot Grahame) freed from a streetwalking charge and then installs her in his apartment building and then hires her as his secretary and his cook -

another girl (Betty Lawford) gets him drunk and then marries him -

Brandon is such a hotshot as the District Attorney that he's in line to be Governor -

Erik Rhodes, that delicate dandy, is the man who wants to take that new wife off of Brandon's hands -

yes, the film, which is fast and furious, plays like a cartoon -

it's dizzy, addled, insane -

what pulls it all together is the extremely cocky performance of Lee Tracy -

if ever a man threatened to walk through the screeen, it is Lee Tracy -

many times, I really wanted to duck -

the man is a whirlwind -

and, oh, my God, the man is so, so cocky!

Criminal-Lawyer-1937-1.jpg

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5 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

You know I had the inkling that you spotlighted this on here because either the perpetrator was either an illegal immigrant or Black. 

Nice job.... You didn't disappoint....

As I only said,  watched it Saturday night, made no comment whatsoever on race, immigration or POLITICS!  The story and trial is in parts, haven't seen everything yet.  Saw the ad on another channel and thought it was interesting.  Although this being a well known event for many (Googled it), personally just learned about it.  My link only contain info on EPISODES!

Strange how you jumped the gun on this! :angry:

Edited by hamradio

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I personally like True Crime, so I'd be interested in hearing about this story.

Unless it pertains directly to film or even television (to an extent), please leave politics off this thread.

Politics belong in the off-topic thread.

Thank you.

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19 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I personally like True Crime, so I'd be interested in hearing about this story.

Unless it pertains directly to film or even television (to an extent), please leave politics off this thread.

Politics belong in the off-topic thread.

Thank you.

What does this have to do with politics??????  As you stated it's a True Crime documentary.  Goodness everyone's REACTIONS speaks volumes.

This crime will certainly have a movie in the works eventually. If a movie does come out guess I shouldn't WATCH IT so not to put some people's underwear in a bunch.

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1934-story-of-floating-weeds-takeshi-sak

A Story of Floating Weeds - Yasujiro Ozu silent film about an out of wedlock father who visits his real son every year with his theater troop. He doesn't want him to realize his father was an actor (a very low class job at the time) and secretly pays for him to go to school. His new actress in the troupe realizes he's secretly the father and tries to get another woman to spill the beans for the son and things go as no one had predicted. This one was a very touching movie and will make you cry. Takeshi Sakamoto is good in the role of the father who is just really unlucky. As the intertitle states the film is about dealing with the ups and downs that life gives. A very good film that will not disappoint. 

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A Notorious Affair (1930) - Very dated melodrama from First National and director Lloyd Bacon. Rich girl Patricia (Billie Dove) secretly weds struggling violinist Paul Gherardi (Basil Rathbone), against the wishes of her father Sir Thomas Hanley (Montagu Love). Their relationship is soon strained when man-hungry Countess Olga (Kay Francis) sets her sights on Paul. Also featuring Kennet Thomson, Philip Strange, Malcolm Waite, Blanche Friderici, and Gino Corrado.

Hammy acting and primitive sound recording hobble this hopelessly corny effort. I watched it for Rathbone, but he's not too good here. The real standout was Francis in one of her early vamp roles.   (5/10)

Source: TCM

a-notorious-affair.jpg

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Our Blushing Brides (1930) - More ensemble melodrama from MGM and director Harry Beaumont. Three department store co-workers, Jerry (Joan Crawford), Connie (Anita Page), and Franky (Dorothy Sebastian), deal with the ups and downs of life and love. Also featuring Robert Montgomery, Raymond Hackett, John Miljan, Hedda Hopper, Albert Conti, Robert Emmett O'Connor, Gwen Lee, Martha Sleeper, Ann Dvorak, Louise Beavers, and Edward Brophy.

MGM returned to the well once more, reteaming Crawford, Page and Sebastian from Our Dancing Daughters (Sebastian sat out Our Modern Maidens) as well as adding Crawford's Untamed co-star Montgomery. The results are less than spectacular. The balance between the three leads is very weak, with the lion's share of screentime going to Crawford, while Page and Sebastian merely act as cautionary tales to further the growth of Crawford's model character. The men are all two-dimensional bores.   (5/10)

Source: TCM

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9 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Our Blushing Brides (1930) - More ensemble melodrama from MGM and director Harry Beaumont. Three department store co-workers, Jerry (Joan Crawford), Connie (Anita Page), and Franky (Dorothy Sebastian), deal with the ups and downs of life and love. Also featuring Robert Montgomery, Raymond Hackett, John Miljan, Hedda Hopper, Albert Conti, Robert Emmett O'Connor, Gwen Lee, Martha Sleeper, Ann Dvorak, Louise Beavers, and Edward Brophy.

MGM returned to the well once more, reteaming Crawford, Page and Sebastian from Our Dancing Daughters (Sebastian sat out Our Modern Maidens) as well as adding Crawford's Untamed co-star Montgomery. The results are less than spectacular. The balance between the three leads is very weak, with the lion's share of screentime going to Crawford, while Page and Sebastian merely act as cautionary tales to further the growth of Crawford's model character. The men are all two-dimensional bores.   (5/10)

Source: TCM

20170703132306!Posterourbb.jpg

Joan Crawford was the breakout star of ODD, so for this follow-up it seems the studio decided to focus on her and her new-found popularity.   For nearly a half-century she remained a star.

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

A Notorious Affair (1930) - Very dated melodrama from First National and director Lloyd Bacon. Rich girl Patricia (Billie Dove) secretly weds struggling violinist Paul Gherardi (Basil Rathbone), against the wishes of her father Sir Thomas Hanley (Montagu Love). Their relationship is soon strained when man-hungry Countess Olga (Kay Francis) sets her sights on Paul. Also featuring Kennet Thomson, Philip Strange, Malcolm Waite, Blanche Friderici, and Gino Corrado.

Hammy acting and primitive sound recording hobble this hopelessly corny effort. I watched it for Rathbone, but he's not too good here. The real standout was Francis in one of her early vamp roles.   (5/10)

Source: TCM

a-notorious-affair.jpg

I find Rathbone's early talkie performances to be pretty stiff. He finally blossomed as a film actor when he played a Dickens villain, Mr. Murdstone in David Copperfield. He brought a coldness to this imperious character, as well as a sadistic relish at the thought of inflicting pain on poor David.

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Outward Bound (1930) - Fantasy drama from Warner Brothers and director Robert Milton. Passengers on an ocean liner begin to suspect something is amiss, as they can't recall how they got there or where they are headed. Featuring Leslie Howard, Douglas Fairbanks Jr., Helen Chandler, Beryl Mercer, Montagu Love, Alison Skipworth, Lyonel Watts, Alec B. Francis, and Dudley Digges.

This adaptation of the hit play marked Howard's first American film. It's dated, naturally, and has been redone and been copied from by dozens of films, TV shows and written works since, but I still enjoyed it. The slightly removed nature of early sound filmmaking adds to the otherworldly ambiance. I also liked the stylized shots of the ship at sea.   (7/10)

Source: TCM

240px-Outward-Bound-LC1.jpg

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Renegades (1930) - Tedious adventure film from Fox and director Victor Fleming. Four troublemaker Legionnaires, including Jean Deucalion (Warner Baxter), Machwurth (Noah Beery Sr.), Dmitri (Gregory Gaye), and Biloxi (George Cooper) are in and out of the brig, occasionally deserting, but returning to fight Arabs marauders. Also featuring Myrna Loy, C. Henry Gordon, Bela Lugosi, Noah Beery Jr., and Victor Jory in his movie debut.

This has to rank in the lower echelon of Legionnaire pictures, as its 90 minute running time seems to go on forever. The dialogue is alternately indecipherable or poorly-delivered, depending on the scene, and the performances are weak, with flubbed lines left in. Loy looks good as a spy who once betrayed Baxter's unlikable hero. Lugosi shows up in the last part of the film as a bearded Arab chieftain.   (5/10)

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The Illustrated Man (1969) Rod Steiger, Claire Bloom, and Robert Drivas. Unimpressive. I don't think I've seen a great Ray Bradbury adaptation yet other than The Martian Chronicles on TV. 

The Illustrated Man Poster

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27 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

The Illustrated Man (1969) Rod Steiger, Claire Bloom, and Robert Drivas. Unimpressive. I don't think I've seen a great Ray Bradbury adaptation yet other than The Martian Chronicles on TV. 

The Illustrated Man Poster

 

It's unimpressive because there are a lot of illustrated people today. :wacko:

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31 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

The Illustrated Man (1969) Rod Steiger, Claire Bloom, and Robert Drivas. Unimpressive. I don't think I've seen a great Ray Bradbury adaptation yet other than The Martian Chronicles on TV. 

The Illustrated Man Poster

Try Disney's adaptation of Something Wicked This Way Comes (1983), scripted and narrated by Bradbury, followed by a Warner Archive copy of Hanna-Barbera's 1993 animated-special of The Halloween Tree, ditto.   An early PBS adaptation of short story "Any Friend of Nicholas Nickelby is a Friend of Mine" also seems to have resurfaced on the public-domain backwaters of Amazon Prime. ?

Outside of those few exceptions, yeah:  You won't find good Bradbury on film, and that includes Francois Truffaut's mod-foreign Fahrenheit 451. There was a Canadian TZ-style anthology series of his short stories, and that was also a less-said-the-better example of why Bradbury is too abstract/poetic to film literally.  

Except for the ones he adapts himself, of course, like John Huston's 1956 Moby Dick, even if that wasn't his book.

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Broadminded (1931) - Awful comedy from First National and director Mervyn LeRoy. Rich guy Jack (William Collier Jr.) is ordered by his father to take a trip to the country to get away from "bad influences". The old man also assigns Jack's cousin Ossie (Joe E. Brown) to go along as a chaperone to keep the young man away from wine, women and song. Much mayhem ensues. Also featuring Ona Munson, Marjorie White, Thelma Todd, Holmes Herbert, Margaret Livingston, Grayce Hampton, and Bela Lugosi.

When people decry the infantile humor of today, longing for the "great wit" of yesteryear's comedies, I think of garbage like this as a rebuttal. It's every bit as stupid and moronic as a typical Adam Sandler flick. Brown is irritating, a squealing idiot man-child and non-stop doofus in search of a laugh who most times comes up empty. Bela Lugosi plays an angry South American named "Pancho Arango", because when you think South American, you naturally think Lugosi. At least the ladies look pleasant. Check out the film's opening sequence, a lavish "Baby Party" where all the adults are required to dress as "no older than 6 years of age", and Brown shows up as a baby in a big stroller. :(   (5/10)

hqdefault.jpg

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4 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Outward Bound (1930) - Fantasy drama from Warner Brothers and director Robert Milton. Passengers on an ocean liner begin to suspect something is amiss, as they can't recall how they got there or where they are headed. Featuring Leslie Howard, Douglas Fairbanks Jr., Helen Chandler, Beryl Mercer, Montagu Love, Alison Skipworth, Lyonel Watts, Alec B. Francis, and Dudley Digges.

 

I like this film too, which I saw on television as a kid. I also like Between Two Worlds, the best known remake. They led me to read Sutton Vane's play and write a report for school. A few of the original Broadway cast were in the early film: Leslie Howard, Dudley Digges, and Beryl Mercer. Others on Broadway were Alfred Lunt, Charlotte Granville, Margalo Gilmore, and J.M. Kerrigan.

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54 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Broadminded (1931) - Awful comedy from First National and director Mervyn LeRoy. Rich guy Jack (William Collier Jr.) is ordered by his father to take a trip to the country to get away from "bad influences". The old man also assigns Jack's cousin Ossie (Joe E. Brown) to go along as a chaperone to keep the young man away from wine, women and song. Much mayhem ensues. Also featuring Ona Munson, Marjorie White, Thelma Todd, Holmes Herbert, Margaret Livingston, Grayce Hampton, and Bela Lugosi.

When people decry the infantile humor of today, longing for the "great wit" of yesteryear's comedies, I think of garbage like this as a rebuttal. It's every bit as stupid and moronic as a typical Adam Sandler flick. Brown is irritating, a squealing idiot man-child and non-stop doofus in search of a laugh who most times comes up empty. Bela Lugosi plays an angry South American named "Pancho Arango", because when you think South American, you naturally think Lugosi. At least the ladies look pleasant. Check out the film's opening sequence, a lavish "Baby Party" where all the adults are required to dress as "no older than 6 years of age", and Brown shows up as a baby in a big stroller. :(   (5/10)

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This must be where Billy Barty got his inspiration for his baby character in The Gold Diggers of 1933.

 Gold-Diggers-of-1933-1933-00-37-59.jpg

But who knows? There are those that are into dressing and acting like adult babies.  It takes all kinds I guess.

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THE HOUSE WITH A CLOCK IN ITS WALLS (2018) Score: 3/5 (despite some poop jokes) 

Starring: Jack Black, Cate Blanchett (Huzzah!), Owen Vaccaro, Kyle MacLachlan, Renee Elise Goldsberry. Based on the 1973 novel by John Bellairs. 

Young orphan Lewis moves to New Zebedee to live with his eccentric Uncle Jonathan. Lewis learns that his uncle is a warlock, and Florence Zimmerman, the woman next door, is a witch, although they are both pure of heart. Jonathan and Florence realize that their deceased wizard friend, Isaac Izard, somehow left a huge clock inside the mansion, and it's only a matter of time before Isaac and his wife Selina come back from the dead and launch their doomsday device. The 3 will have to use all of their magical prowess to try to defeat the wicked pair. 

Much better than I had previously thought it would be. It was definitely a tad bit creepier than I had anticipated as well, but nothing too scary. The screenplay stayed fairly true to the original novel, so that was certainly a plus. Not to be weird or anything, but Cate Blanchett is pretty damn near perfect in anything she ever does on-screen. Her acting was entirely too good for this movie, but I'm not complaining. 

Image result for the house with a clock in its walls

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7 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

THE HOUSE WITH A CLOCK IN ITS WALLS (2018) Score: 3/5 (despite some poop jokes) 

Starring: Jack Black, Cate Blanchett (Huzzah!), Owen Vaccaro, Kyle MacLachlan, Renee Elise Goldsberry. Based on the 1973 novel by John Bellairs. 

Young orphan Lewis moves to New Zebedee to live with his eccentric Uncle Jonathan. Lewis learns that his uncle is a warlock, and Florence Zimmerman, the woman next door, is a witch, although they are both pure of heart. Jonathan and Florence realize that their deceased wizard friend, Isaac Izard, somehow left a huge clock inside the mansion, and it's only a matter of time before Isaac and his wife Selina come back from the dead and launch their doomsday device. The 3 will have to use all of their magical prowess to try to defeat the wicked pair. 

Much better than I had previously thought it would be. It was definitely a tad bit creepier than I had anticipated as well, but nothing too scary. The screenplay stayed fairly true to the original novel, so that was certainly a plus. Not to be weird or anything, but Cate Blanchett is pretty damn near perfect in anything she ever does on-screen. Her acting was entirely too good for this movie, but I'm not complaining. 

 

I've seen the preview for this movie a couple times now.  I didn't really have high hopes for it.  I think what turned me off the most about it is the title.  Granted, I see that the movie is based on a book, so the title probably comes from that; but it's so lame.  The House with a Clock in its Walls sounds like a working title that you'd use until you thought of something better.

I do like Cate Blanchett though and Jack Black has his moments.  I haven't read the book.  Sometimes I am turned off by movies featuring wizards and spells and such--I don't know why.  I think it's because so many of them just end up being dull. I'm not a big Harry Potter fan. 

Maybe Blanchett just wanted a chance of pace and decided to do something "fun." The woman has 2 Oscars, she doesn't really have any more to prove in the movie world--winning the Oscar is like winning the Super Bowl for an actor.  Unless Blanchett is going after her EGOT or something.  

This may be a RedBox or library film.

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19 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Maybe Blanchett just wanted a chance of pace and decided to do something "fun." The woman has 2 Oscars, she doesn't really have any more to prove in the movie world--winning the Oscar is like winning the Super Bowl for an actor.  Unless Blanchett is going after her EGOT or something.  

She has four children, ages 17 and younger, so she may have done this one for them. When big name performers start showing up in children's movies or family films, they usually have a kid or grand kid in the age range of the target audience. 

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The film short on TCM "Subject Narcotics".  The intro..

23lnw1w.jpg

...presented the problem to begin with, it should had been a public educational film! :angry:

What a riot at the very end the narrator said...The people must be made aware its a social as much a police problem. How can they when the producers made this film for law enforcement only? :wacko:

It's on Youtube.

Vintage Educational Film: Narcotic Educational Foundation of America

 

Question...What's the difference between the 1950's and if this was made exactly the same way today (remake)?

Answer...None, just the fashion wear and cars only changed!

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7 hours ago, EricJ said:

Try Disney's adaptation of Something Wicked This Way Comes (1983), scripted and narrated by Bradbury,

I have seen it but it must have been back in the 1980's, I didn't mention it because I don't remember it at all. like I remembered and enjoyed The Martian Chronicles.

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7 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

 Brown is irritating, a squealing idiot man-child and non-stop doofus in search of a laugh who most times comes up empty.

giphy.gif

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9 hours ago, EricJ said:

Try Disney's adaptation of Something Wicked This Way Comes (1983), scripted and narrated by Bradbury, followed by a Warner Archive copy of Hanna-Barbera's 1993 animated-special of The Halloween Tree, ditto.   An early PBS adaptation of short story "Any Friend of Nicholas Nickelby is a Friend of Mine" also seems to have resurfaced on the public-domain backwaters of Amazon Prime. ?

Outside of those few exceptions, yeah:  You won't find good Bradbury on film, and that includes Francois Truffaut's mod-foreign Fahrenheit 451. There was a Canadian TZ-style anthology series of his short stories, and that was also a less-said-the-better example of why Bradbury is too abstract/poetic to film literally.  

Except for the ones he adapts himself, of course, like John Huston's 1956 Moby Dick, even if that wasn't his book.

I MAY catch a well-deserved Hell for this, but...

SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES used to show on HBO all the time when I was growing up and I liked it, so i read the "book" years later and was underwhelmed to say the least. It's a 60 page story outline bloated into 120 by being double spaced in size 14 font and every new chapter (of which there are several)  begins on a page with two lines of type- a profound waste of paper.

I have not read THE MARTIAN CHRONICLES, so I might ought to keep my yap shut til' then, but between SOMETHING WICKED, FAHRENHEIT 451 (which really did not impress me) and some of his radio scripts, I am of the very strong opinion that BRADBURY was an idea man who was able to come up with some intriguing story outlines, but when it comes to the actual execution of said ideas: YAWNSVILLE.

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