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7 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

The parachute jumper in the poster looks like he's going to land on Bette's forehead.

Remember those fireworks you got as a kid that had a little green army man in them that dropped down with a parachute after they went off?

those were awesome.

sorry, that's all I got.

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12 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Remember those fireworks you got as a kid that had a little green army man in them that dropped down with a parachute after they went off?

those were awesome.

sorry, that's all I got.

Lol.  We never had fireworks that had toys drop out of them, but I know of the parachute men of which you speak.

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

Does anyone do any parachute jumping in the film??

Yeah, a couple of times. Fairbanks does a dangerous parachute jump for an air show to earn a quick buck, and later on, when he and McHugh are running from border patrol agents in fighter planes, they have to jump.

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Scarlet River (1933) - Unusual B-Western from RKO and director Otto Brower. Tom Keene stars as Tom Baxter, a B-western movie star. His latest picture is looking for a shooting location, and they settle on the ranch of Judy Blake (Dorothy Wilson). When Tom discovers that Judy's ranch foreman (Lon Chaney Jr.) is stealing from her, the movie hero becomes a real hero. Also featuring Edgar Kennedy, Roscoe Ates, Betty Furness, Billy Butts, Hooper Atchley, Jack Raymond, Jim Mason, Yakima Canutt, and cameos by Joel McRae, Bruce Cabot, Julie Haydon, Rochelle Hudson, and Myrna Loy as themselves.

I thought this was entertaining, even if I was disappointed to learn that Loy appears for a couple of seconds only. The movie's plot was meta long before meta was a thing, and it's fun to see the genre conventions skewered a bit.   (6/10)

Source: TCM

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Secret of the Blue Room (1933) - Mystery from Universal and director Kurt Neumann. In a large forbidding castle, three men attempt to win the hand of Irene (Gloria Stuart) by spending the night in a supposedly haunted room where 3 murders took place decades earlier. When one of the suitors is killed, police commissioner Forster (Edward Arnold) is determined to learn the secret of the Blue Room. Also featuring Lionel Atwill, Paul Lukas, Onslow Stevens, William Janney, Robert Barrat, Russell Hopton, Muriel Kirkland, and Elizabeth Patterson.

This is fairly indistinguishable from dozens of other "old dark house" style mystery thrillers released from the late 20's through the 40's. The cast is a little bit more noteworthy, and I liked Arnold as the dogged police investigator. A passable if unexceptional mystery.   (6/10)

Source: TCM

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Voltaire (1933) - Dull biopic from Warner Brothers and director John G. Adolfi. The film focuses on the last years of French writer Voltaire (George Arliss) circa the 1760's under the reign of King Louis XV (Reginald Owen). Voltaire's writings, both in direct calls to action and in bitingly satirical works, fostered the growing revolutionary spirit in the country, making him a target for Royalist agents such as Count De Sarnac (Alan Mowbray). Also featuring Margaret Lindsay, Doris Kenyon, Theodore Newton, Gordon Westcott, David Torrence, Murray Kinnell, Doris Lloyd, Gino Corrado, and Douglass Dumbrille.

The production design is nice, with suitably elaborate costumes and sets, and there are moments of zest and wit, with an energetic performance from Arliss in the lead, but I still found myself bored with much of it. I never really clicked with any of the supporting players, and the subjects addressed in the film (either the life of the writer, or the subject of 18th century French Revolutionary sentiment) are too big for this meager production to adequately delve into with any depth.    (6/10)

Source: TCM

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When Ladies Meet (1933) - Romantic comedy/drama from MGM and director Harry Beaumont. Novelist Mary Howard (Myrna Loy) has eyes for her sophisticated, older publisher Rogers Woodruf (Frank Morgan), which annoys newspaperman Jimmie Lee (Robert Montgomery), who loves Mary. So Jimmie conspires to have Mary meet Woodruf's wife Clare (Ann Harding) without the two women knowing who the other is. Also featuring Alice Brady, Martin Burton, Luis Alberni, and Sterling Holloway.

I watched the 1941 remake of this, featuring Joan Crawford, Robert Taylor, Greer Garson, and Herbert Marshall, earlier this year, so I was familiar with the story beats, which were little changed. This older version seems a bit less playful, although Montgomery brings his usual smirking wit. Loy gets away from her usual vamp villain roles in something a little more like her later parts, classy and cultured, something at which Harding was already a pro. Frank Morgan in a romantic role was unusual. The movie earned an Oscar nomination for Best Art Direction.   (6/10)

Source: TCM

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40 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

When Ladies Meet (1933) - Romantic comedy/drama from MGM and director Harry Beaumont. Novelist Mary Howard (Myrna Loy) has eyes for her sophisticated, older publisher Rogers Woodruf (Frank Morgan), which annoys newspaperman Jimmie Lee (Robert Montgomery), who loves Mary. So Jimmie conspires to have Mary meet Woodruf's wife Clare (Ann Harding) without the two women knowing who the other is. Also featuring Alice Brady, Martin Burton, Luis Alberni, and Sterling Holloway.

I watched the 1941 remake of this, featuring Joan Crawford, Robert Taylor, Greer Garson, and Herbert Marshall, earlier this year, so I was familiar with the story beats, which were little changed. This older version seems a bit less playful, although Montgomery brings his usual smirking wit. Loy gets away from her usual vamp villain roles in something a little more like her later parts, classy and cultured, something at which Harding was already a pro. Frank Morgan in a romantic role was unusual. The movie earned an Oscar nomination for Best Art Direction.   (6/10)

Source: TCM

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I enjoy the 41 version more for a few reasons with one being that I just don't see Morgan being such a romantic draw to the two ladies.   I.e. more like when ladies run.    Morgan was a fine actor but this role just doesn't work for me.    

PS:  so will you be reviewing Cleoparta soon?  (wink - now that I know why you change avatars).   If you do please ensure you post the bath scene picture from the film!

 

 

 

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26 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

PS:  so will you be reviewing Cleoparta soon?  (wink - now that I know why you change avatars).   If you do please ensure you post the bath scene picture from the film!

No, I saw Cleopatra many a year ago, so I won't be reviewing it this go 'round. My Colbert avatar is in honor of It Happened One Night (the "Hitchhiker" title above the pic was a clue!), my current favorite movie of 1934. I'm trying to choose an actress from my favorite film of whichever year I'm watching, or one of my favorites if the #1 choice doesn't have any major female roles in it. 

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"The Silencers" - Phil Karlson - 1967 -

"Murderers' Row" - Henry Levin - 1967 -

These movies are parodies of the James Bond flicks - they're rather weak, bloodless imitations - and the villains (Victor Buono and Karl Malden) aren't very good - the women are both fake and cartoonish (Stella Stevens and Ann-Margret) - the humor which hinges on a secret agent (Dean Martin) with a perpetual "****" is very persuasive - if all of this is your idea of "a good time", then, please, go right ahead - to me, these movies are Kleenix - use once and then throw away - 

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5 minutes ago, rayban said:

"The Ambushers" - Phil Karlson - 1967 -

"Murderers' Row" - Henry Levin - 1967 -

These movies are parodies of the James Bond flicks - they're rather weak, bloodless imitations - and the villains (Victor Buono and Karl Malden) aren't very good - the women are both fake and cartoonish (Stella Stevens and Ann-Margret) - the humor which hinges on a secret agent (Dean Martin) with a perpetual "****" is very persuasive - if all of this is your idea of "a good time", then, please, go right ahead - to me, these movies are Kleenix - use once and then throw away - 

Someone gifted me the DVD box set of the Matt Helm movies many years ago. They knew that I liked the James Bond movies, and they thought, after looking at the description on the box, that the Matt Helm movies would be up my alley. I watched them all...once. They've collected dust ever since!

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9 minutes ago, rayban said:

"The Ambushers" - Phil Karlson - 1967 -

"Murderers' Row" - Henry Levin - 1967 -

These movies are parodies of the James Bond flicks - they're rather weak, bloodless imitations - and the villains (Victor Buono and Karl Malden) aren't very good - the women are both fake and cartoonish (Stella Stevens and Ann-Margret) - the humor which hinges on a secret agent (Dean Martin) with a perpetual "****" is very persuasive - if all of this is your idea of "a good time", then, please, go right ahead - to me, these movies are Kleenix - use once and then throw away - 

More corny then a field in Iowa.     One thing I did notice was that in the one with Malden,  at the end when the nice looking blonde is hit by an arrow,  Malden ends his sentence with "Doctor",  and the blonde says "NO".

I assume this was in reference to the 1962 Bond film.

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Andrei Rublev (1966).  Story of famed 15th century Russian icon painter told in seven vignettes, although it's really the story of an artists suffering as well as the suffering of a country going through turbulent times.

There's a lot of violence, notably in the vignette regarding the sacking of Vladimir, which includes lots of people being killed, a cow set on fire, and a horse falling down a flight of stairs to its doom.

This one, along with some of director Andrei Tarkovsky's other work, is often put on those lists of greatest movies of all time.  I have to say that although it's competently made, I didn't see why it should show up on any "greatest of all time" list.  6/10

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6 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

More corny then a field in Iowa.     One thing I did notice was that in the one with Malden,  at the end when the nice looking blonde is hit by an arrow,  Malden ends his sentence with "Doctor",  and the blonde says "NO".

I assume this was in reference to the 1962 Bond film.

True story--I remember when kids' shows aired in the morning before the network housewife shows, and at preschool age, somebody not only had to turn the channel for me, but tell me when the show ended.

I remember watching some morning babysitting fare, and the station moved into the morning housewife network fare, so I didn't really know where the show ended when the network showed a promo for that night's Matt Helm movie.  (Think it was "Murderers' Row", with the Helm girls holding their "funeral" for presumed-dead Matt.)

Umm......okay??  ?

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14 minutes ago, rayban said:

"The Silencers" - Phil Karlson - 1967 -

"Murderers' Row" - Henry Levin - 1967 -

These movies are parodies of the James Bond flicks - they're rather weak, bloodless imitations - and the villains (Victor Buono and Karl Malden) aren't very good - the women are both fake and cartoonish (Stella Stevens and Ann-Margret) - the humor which hinges on a secret agent (Dean Martin) with a perpetual "****" is very persuasive - if all of this is your idea of "a good time", then, please, go right ahead - to me, these movies are Kleenix - use once and then throw away - 

maxresdefault.jpg

I can't believe in Dean Martin as a secret agent who thrives on sex - morning, noon and night.

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5 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Secret of the Blue Room (1933) - Mystery from Universal and director Kurt Neumann. In a large forbidding castle, three men attempt to win the hand of Irene (Gloria Stuart) by spending the night in a supposedly haunted room where 3 murders took place decades earlier. When one of the suitors is killed, police commissioner Forster (Edward Arnold) is determined to learn the secret of the Blue Room. Also featuring Lionel Atwill, Paul Lukas, Onslow Stevens, William Janney, Robert Barrat, Russell Hopton, Muriel Kirkland, and Elizabeth Patterson.

This is fairly indistinguishable from dozens of other "old dark house" style mystery thrillers released from the late 20's through the 40's. The cast is a little bit more noteworthy, and I liked Arnold as the dogged police investigator. A passable if unexceptional mystery.   (6/10)

Source: TCM

220px-Poster_of_the_movie_Secret_of_the_

I thought that "the secret" turned out to be rather ingenious.

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Bulldog Drummond Strikes Back (1934) - Fun mystery thriller from 20th Century Pictures and director Roy Del Ruth. Gentleman detective Hugh "Bulldog" Drummond (Ronald Colman) is heading home through the foggy London night after attending the wedding of his friend Algy (Charles Butterworth), when Drummond stumbles upon a dead body and a twisting mystery involving the emotionally fragile Lola (Loretta Young) and devious nobleman Prince Achmed (Warner Oland). Also featuring C. Aubrey Smith, Una Merkel, Kathleen Burke, Arthur Hohl, E.E. Clive, Halliwell Hobbes, George Regas, Ethel Griffies, Mischa Auer, and Lucille Ball.

Colman returns as Drummond 5 years after the hit original film. The cast this time around is fantastic, with interesting character actors, funny comic relief from Butterworth and Merkel, and lovely ladies Young and Burke. Colman and Oland look like they're having a blast, and their amusement is infectious. There are some rough edges due to the film limitations of the time, but those are easily overlooked.    (7/10)

MV5BMzI2M2IzNzUtY2I5ZC00NGYyLTg2MGUtMDNj

 

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Death Takes a Holiday (1934) - Romantic fantasy from Paramount Pictures and director Mitchell Leisen. The Grim Reaper, the (un)living embodiment of death itself, takes the human form of European Count Sirki (Fredric March) in order to learn the mysteries of human life and love from a group of wealthy aristocrats. Featuring Sir Guy Standing, Evelyn Venable, Katharine Alexander, Gail Patrick, Helen Westley, Kathleen Howard, Kent Taylor, and Henry Travers.

This atmospheric diversion is lightly witty and easy going despite the potentially heavy subject matter. March is amusing with his vague accent and deadpan delivery, while Venable is darkly appealing; one believes that she'd fall in love with death. The movie was notably remade and expanded to a three hour running time in 1998 with the title Meet Joe Black, featuring Brad Pitt, Anthony Hopkins and Claire Forlani. I didn't hate that one as much as many, but I'd stick to this one.    (7/10)

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3 hours ago, EricJ said:

True story--I remember when kids' shows aired in the morning before the network housewife shows, and at preschool age, somebody not only had to turn the channel for me, but tell me when the show ended.

I remember watching some morning babysitting fare, and the station moved into the morning housewife network fare, so I didn't really know where the show ended when the network showed a promo for that night's Matt Helm movie.  (Think it was "Murderers' Row", with the Helm girls holding their "funeral" for presumed-dead Matt.)

Umm......okay??  ?

Yes, that was "Murderers' Row" with the effable Ann-Margret.

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Watched and recorded "Solo" (2018) on Directv pay per view.  Alden Ehrenreich seems to be a good actor I can get use to but he simply don't have the chemistry as Harrison Ford.  Movie is a bit "cluttered" at times, hard to make out what is what.

The Maelstrom? Whatever.

Was surprise to see Darth Maul.  Can still hear "I Fall To Pieces" at his memorial services. :P

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