Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

Well, I didn't really "just watch" anything( as it's about 8:00 am EDT as I'm typing this.  ;)  ), but last  night I watched my DVD of THE SILENT PARTNER('78) with ELLIOTT GOULD and cHRISTOPHER PLUMMER.

Hadn't seen it in quite a while, and as there was nothing worthwile on the tube at the time, I brought it out and gave it a look.  I always thought it a cleverly written and well executed film, and after finally traking down the book it was adapted from("Think Of A Number" by ANDERS BODELSEN) I did see fit to put it on my short list of "Movies that were BETTER than the book!"  ;)

Sepiatone

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, rayban said:

"Eye of the Devil" - J. Lee Thompson - 1966 -

"Spoiler Alert" -

with a terrific cast - Deborah Kerr, David Niven, Donald Pleasance, Emlyn Williams, Flora Robson, Sharon Tate, David Hemmings, Robert Duncan and Suky Appleby, etc. -

This forgotten film is an extremely atmospheric and extremely errie "thriller" about a woman (Kerr) who gradually discovers that her husband (Niven) whose vineyards have been failing for years must return home to fulfill a family ritual (his death) to replenish the vineyards -

the vineyards and the people who work there are stopped in time and eagerly anticipate the ritual -

as the owner who must save "his people", Philippe (Niven) does not and will not fight the family tradition -

as his wife , Catherine (Kerr) does all that she can to prevent his death -

as the murderous youngsters, Odile and Christian De Caray, Sharon Tate and David Hemmings will chill you to the bone - they are there to execute Philippe -

as the couple's children, Jacques and Antoinette, Robert Duncan and Suky Appleby are very fine young actors -

it's a great film about a most unpleasant subject - ritual sacrifice -

a ritual sacrifice that cannot be denied -

Philippe realizes that what he is doing is "divine" -

in the end, little Jacques, in the presence of the priest (Pleasance), will agree to carry on "the family traditon" -

this is a film that is so well-done that it will knock your socks off -

eye-of-the-devil-year-1966-uk-director-j

Devil-07.jpg

 

    

I caught the last two thirds of this and was really impressed with what I did see. I was reminded of Dark Shadows (the original TV 66-71 soap) it had that type of ambiance, but a thousand times the production values. 

Too bad the original Dark Shadows didn't get this kind of treatment.

Glad you cleared up what the purpose of the human sacrifice was all about, even without knowing that the images were riveting enough to watch the film to the end.

P.S. I didn't even know what the title was, thanks

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

"The Fox" - Mark Rydell - 1967 -

"Spoiler Alert" -

with Sandy Dennis, Keir Dullea and Anne Heywood -

the screenplay is credited to Lewis John Carlino and Howard Koch -

but everything that was subtext in D.H. Lawrence's novella is brought to the surface here -

it makes for an explosive movie in its' time -

it did have an "x" rating -

a young man (Paul) intrudes on the life of two lesbians (Jill and Ellen) and, in the process, he destroys their relationship -

this drama is intense and claustrophobic and needs three fine actors to succeed -

Mark Rydell found them in Sandy Dennis (Jill), Keir Dullea (Paul) and Anne Heywood (Ellen) -

their interplay is both subtle and gripping -

Paul wants Ellen to marry him -

and, of course, Jill is horrified -

the screenplay takes an unexpected turn when Ellen decides against Paul -

but Paul is a very persistent young man -

again, the story takes an expected turn -

and the ending is "problematic", to say the least -

did Jill invite her death? -

and does Ellen get what she wants - Paul? -

Mark Rydell directs the principals very knowingly-

and William Fraker's photography realizes the cold and forbidding climate -

you don't always get what you think you want, but, if you do, it may be too late -

can Ellen survive what Paul has done to her? -

fox1967.75551_110820161105.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

I caught the last two thirds of this and was really impressed with what I did see. I was reminded of Dark Shadows (the original TV 66-71 soap) it had that type of ambiance, but a thousand times the production values. 

Too bad the original Dark Shadows didn't get this kind of treatment.

Glad you cleared up what the purpose of the human sacrifice was all about, even without known that the images were riveting enough to watch the film to the end.

P.S. I didn't even know what the title was, thanks

Cigarjoe, I hope that you get to see the whole film someday.

Did you manage to record it?

How did this film fall by the wayside?

It probably failed at the box office.

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, rayban said:

Cigarjoe, I hope that you get to see the whole film someday.

Did you manage to record it?

How did this film fall by the wayside?

It probably failed at the box office.

I had a long day. Got up at 5:30 AM had to stick around until a couple came by to pick up some used furniture. They were running late, didn't show up until 11:30. Then I had to drive down to Long Island to get 4WD beach driving permits had to hit both State Park offices and Fire Island National Seashore offices, so I was pretty beat by the time I got to my cousins place, we had a few drinks and i fell asleep early about 9:00 PM but woke up when Eye Of The Devil was on and just watched it to the end. I'm sure it's probably on TCM on Demand but I haven't checked.

I'll watch it all the way through if its on.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

I had a long day. Got up at 5:30 AM had to stick around until a couple came by to pick up some used furniture. They were running late, didn't show up until 11:30. Then I had to drive down to Long Island to get 4WD beach driving permits had to hit both State Park offices and Fire Island National Seashore offices, so I was pretty beat by the time I got to my cousins place, we had a few drinks and i fell asleep early about 9:00 PM but woke up when Eye Of The Devil was on and just watched it to the end. I'm sure it's probably on TCM on Demand but I haven't checked.

I'll watch it all the way through if its on.

You did more than enough that day.

But, yeah, I could see "Eye of the Devil" waking you up.

Link to post
Share on other sites

THE CELLULOID CLOSET (1995) includes a moment from THE FOX in their montage of "gay characters killed in freakish ways as de facto punishment for their gayness," which was the highlight of the film for me....it takes a really offensive series of images and reduces them marvelously to camp, and what- quite frankly- could be gayer than that?

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

okay- so- NONE SHALL ESCAPE (1944):

this was an incredibly powerful, imaginative, relentless and eye-opening film, one that would technically make a great companion piece to Douglas Sirk's HITLER'S MADMAN (1943)- although you'd probably have to undergo extensive lithium treatments if you watched them back to back.

and like HITLER'S MADMAN, I don't think I'll ever watch another film by the same director (in this case ANDRE DE TOTH) in the same way again- because it was so masterfully put together, so relentlessly uncompromising and constructed. it reminded me a trifle of WUTHERING HEIGHTS (the novel) in that it had a symmetrical structure- showing the mistakes of one generation being repeated by another.

it's the story of a Nazi on trial for war crimes in Poland, set in the future after WWII had ended (a bold move by the screenwriters)

there was an exceptional scene 2/3 of the way through where the local Polish Jews are being loaded onto a train for a Concentration Camp and revolt, only to be massacred. the camera movements and editing were incredible, I sat up and cried in horror when- quite clearly- a German officer's staff car runs over several bodies lying in the mud. how that got past the censors I don't know, but it was very effective.

the acting was superlative, MARSHA HUNT, who I knew as the dorky sister from PRIDE AND PREJUDICE (1940) ages so believably (the make-up was great!) in a vanity-free performance; HENRY TRAVERS was also good, but the real revelation for me was ALEXANDER KNOX- who I knew only from THE SEA WOLF and the WILSON (where I was not impressed by his Oscar-nominated role as an inexplicably British-accented Woodrow Wilson)- his German accent is perfect here. apparently they wanted PAUL LUKAS for the role, and thank God he didn't get it, because- as an actor- he was incapable of conveying what Knox did, the whole film hangs on his shoulders and he holds nothing back; it's a nuanced look into the banality of evil that doesn't resort to mustache twirling, a MOVIE STAR in the same role would have demanded rewrites to make the part sympathetic.

i was also stunned at how this film dealt openly with r a p e throughout.

highly recommended, especially for anyone who is conflicted about the current state of the world.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Constant Nymph (1943).  I apparently recorded this film a long time ago as there as a TCM Shop ad preceding it telling me that Christmas was coming soon.  This was a strange film that I think I liked, but probably wouldn't watch again.  I recorded it mainly for the cast: Joan Fontaine, Charles Boyer, Alexis Smith, Peter Lorre and Charles Coburn--all people that I like.  

The Constant Nymph told the story of a composer (Boyer) who travels to Switzerland to reconnect with a family friend and his daughters.  One daughter in particular, Tessa (Fontaine), has had a lifetime crush on Boyer, but due to the fact that she's a child (I believe she's supposed to be 14-ish in the beginning of the film) and he's an adult, nothing is happening obviously.  Boyer is blind to Tessa's affection for him (as well he should be, imo).  Later, after their father dies, Tessa and her sister are sent to England to live with their wealthy uncle and cousin (Coburn and Smith, respectively).  This is after Coburn and Smith have visited Boyer and the girls in Switzerland to help get them ready to travel back to England.  Despite being a few years younger than Fontaine, Smith is cast as the sophisticated 20-something cousin of Fontaine.  Smith's height and wardrobe lends greatly to the illusion that she's much older than Fontaine and is her guardian.  Alexis Smith can wear a long "drapey" gown like nobody's business.

Fontaine was semi-believable as a teenager.  Despite being in her mid-20s when this was filmed, I bought her as a teenager, most of the time.  In the beginning of the movie, with her wet hair and simple dress, I bought her as a child. There were other scenes however, where her facial features most definitely didn't say kid and she just looked like a tiny adult. Her constant heart issues throughout the film provided foreshadowing too.

The Fontaine/Boyer relationship was odd.  It started out fairly innocent then devolved into something else that just seemed uncomfortable.  Smith's character was painted as a bit of a villain, but I fully sympathize with her.  Here she thought she was marrying the love of her life, who by the way can't even answer why he married her, and here's some kid trying to steal her husband.  Smith tried to brush it off as puppy love, but she begins to have her doubts (rightfully so).  I kept laughing when Smith, affecting an English accent, kept saying A-GAIN instead of A-Geyn.  Perhaps that is how some British speaking people pronounce that word, but Smith's pronunciation of "again" didn't match the rest of her speech.

I liked parts of this film but as a whole, I thought it was strange.  I loved Charles Coburn, he was funny.  I like how he kept calling one of the hired hands "Robert-O" instead of "Roberto."  I also liked Alexis Smith and Peter Lorre.  I liked Joan Fontaine most of the time in this film. 

I don't think I'll need to see this film again.

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

The Constant Nymph (1943). 

Fontaine was semi-believable as a teenager.  Despite being in her mid-20s when this was filmed, I bought her as a teenager, most of the time.  In the beginning of the movie, with her wet hair and simple dress, I bought her as a child. There were other scenes however, where her facial features most definitely didn't say kid and she just looked like a tiny adult.

oddly enough, LETTER FROM AN UNKNOWN WOMAN, which came out 5 years after THE CONSTANT NYMPH, has La Fontaine playing a teenaged character more believably. it was directed by MAX OPHULS and costars LOUIS JORDAN and it is an exquisite film that should have garnered Fontaine a Best Actress nomination, but sadly did not.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

oddly enough, LETTER FROM AN UNKNOWN WOMAN, which came out 5 years after THE CONSTANT NYMPH, has La Fontaine playing a teenaged character more believably. it was directed by MAX OPHULS and costars LOUIS JORDAN and it is an exquisite film that should have garnered Fontaine a Best Actress nomination, but sadly did not.

I looked for years for a copy of "Letter from an Unknown Woman" being a major Ophuls fan. When I finally located a copy, I was mesmerized. It's a movie that deserves more recognition and yes, Fontaine was quite believable in all the ages she played from youth to maturity. Jourdan was never better and Ophuls moving camera, worked tremendously in this film. Supposedly used to counter his perhaps dyslexic tendencies, the sweeping shots are admirably framed and give a thrilling scope to each set piece. Thanks for mentioning this film, Lorna!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

The Constant Nymph (1943).  I apparently recorded this film a long time ago as there as a TCM Shop ad preceding it telling me that Christmas was coming soon.  This was a strange film that I think I liked, but probably wouldn't watch again.  I recorded it mainly for the cast: Joan Fontaine, Charles Boyer, Alexis Smith, Peter Lorre and Charles Coburn--all people that I like.  

The Constant Nymph told the story of a composer (Boyer) who travels to Switzerland to reconnect with a family friend and his daughters.  One daughter in particular, Tessa (Fontaine), has had a lifetime crush on Boyer, ...

 

....The Fontaine/Boyer relationship was odd.  It started out fairly innocent then devolved into something else that just seemed uncomfortable.  Smith's character was painted as a bit of a villain, but I fully sympathize with her.  Here she thought she was marrying the love of her life, who by the way can't even answer why he married her, and here's some kid trying to steal her husband.  Smith tried to brush it off as puppy love, but she begins to have her doubts (rightfully so).  ...

 I don't think I'll need to see this film again.

I feel the same way about The Constant Nymph: I'm glad I saw it, mainly because I'd heard of it, and also for the cast; but I have no real interest in seeing it again.  Full disclosure: I did not see it in its recent airing on TCM, it was a few years ago I watched it. So my memory might be inaccurate in some parts about the film.

The only thing I might argue with in speedy's excellent write-up of The Constant Nymph is her sympathy for the Alexis Smith character ("Florence".)  Yes, true, she married Lewis ( Boyer) in good faith and all that. But what the film makes clear is that she has little regard, really, for his music. Right from the first moment we see Boyer, he talks about his music and his composing career. It's clear he loves music, it's the most important thing in his life. He has ambitions to be a famous composer, not so much for the success it might bring, but for recognition of his musical ideas. As I remember the film, his wife is mainly interested and supportive of that aspect of his character because it will mean social success for them both.

Tessa (Fontaine), on the other hand, is completely sympatico with Lewis and his musical dreams. She knows how much it means to him, and it is she, not Florence, who supports and truly understands his passion for music and composition.

I forget the details ( as I said, it was a while ago I saw it), but I do remember that about it. Also,  - SPOILER - I think there's something near the end about how Lewis finally gets a chance to have his music performed by some respected symphony orchestra, a big concert, an event that's broadcast on the radio. But due to her health issue, Joan/Tessa cannot attend it, and listens with tears in her eyes to the broadcast of her beloved Lewis' music being performed, joyful in the knowledge that the one she loves is finally having his dream come true. And then of course she dies. But happy.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, CaveGirl said:

I looked for years for a copy of "Letter from an Unknown Woman" being a major Ophuls fan. When I finally located a copy, I was mesmerized. It's a movie that deserves more recognition and yes, Fontaine was quite believable in all the ages she played from youth to maturity. Jourdan was never better and Ophuls moving camera, worked tremendously in this film. Supposedly used to counter his perhaps dyslexic tendencies, the sweeping shots are admirably framed and give a thrilling scope to each set piece. Thanks for mentioning this film, Lorna!

And thank you for also loving it, I’m kind of surprised but every time I mention LETTER FROM AN UNKNOWN WOMAN someone usually chimes in with the fact that it’s not one of their favorites, and while I (try to) respect the opinions of others, it’s hard for me to wrap their mind around anyone not liking it. It is a completely brilliant film.

Thank you also for reminding me that Louis Jourdan spelled his name with a “u”. My oopsie on that.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, LornaHansonForbes said:

And thank you for also loving it, I’m kind of surprised but every time I mention LETTER FROM AN UNKNOWN WOMAN someone usually chimes in with the fact that it’s not one of their favorites, and while I respect the opinions of others, it’s hard for me to wrap their mind around anyone not liking it. It is a completely brilliant film.

Thank you also for reminding me that Louis Jourdan spelled his name with a “u”. My oopsie on that.

Didn't notice your lack of a necessary "u", Lorna due to the constant complaining of Dargo about too many superfluous "u"s at the TCM site, so let's blame him!

I am simply amazed that anyone would not appreciate LFAUW! Why I might just have to take them off my speed dial for such an infraction. It is simply a divine movie, and besides being gorgeous to view has deeply profound meanings as it weaves its tale. 

Some folks just got no couth, ya know what I mean?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, CaveGirl said:

Didn't notice your lack of a necessary "u", Lorna due to the constant complaining of Dargo about too many superfluous "u"s at the TCM site, so let's blame him!

I am simply amazed that anyone would not appreciate LFAUW! Why I might just have to take them off my speed dial for such an infraction. It is simply a divine movie, and besides being gorgeous to view has deeply profound meanings as it weaves its tale. 

Some folks just got no couth, ya know what I mean?

Well, to be fair, I’m a person with strong opinions and the good Lord knows there’s plenty of films that everyone else on earth loves, but I don’t.

For example, I always root for Edward Arnold in MR SMITH and MEET JOHN DOE.  

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

And thank you for also loving it, I’m kind of surprised but every time I mention LETTER FROM AN UNKNOWN WOMAN someone usually chimes in with the fact that it’s not one of their favorites, and while I (try to) respect the opinions of others, it’s hard for me to wrap their mind around anyone not liking it. It is a completely brilliant film.

Thank you also for reminding me that Louis Jourdan spelled his name with a “u”. My oopsie on that.

Lorna, I liked Letter From an Unknown Woman.  But  !  SPOILER   Something I found implausible was  that Joan's lover (Louis Jourdan) would not  remember her.  I know the whole point was that for  Joan's character , this was the love of her life, a passionate affair that changed her forever, etc. etc.  (and doesn't she have his baby???can't remember for sure, it was a long time ago I saw it)  so, given that, how ironic etc. etc. that Stefan (Jourdan) wouldn't remember her at all. Showing what a user of women he was, how shallow and dishonest he was, and so force*.  And while I can believe that he was all those things, I just cannot believe that he would not recall Joan at all. That's a sticking point for me with the film.

edit: Typing too fast. I meant "so forth".

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Well, to be fair, I’m a person with strong opinions and the good Lord knows there’s plenty of films that everyone else on earth loves, but I don’t.

For example, I always root for Edward Arnold in MR SMITH and MEET JOHN DOE.  

Yeah, ya gotta love him even when he is dastardly!

I was just teasing. Wouldn't take them off my speed dial.

I would refuse to let them pick what movie we are going to at the multi-plex though, Lorna.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Lorna, I liked Letter From an Unknown Woman.  But  !  SPOILER   Something I found implausible was  that Joan's lover (Louis Jourdan) would not  remember her.  I know the whole point was that for  Joan's character , this was the love of her life, a passionate affair that changed her forever, etc. etc.  (and doesn't she have his baby???can't remember for sure, it was a long time ago I saw it)  so, given that, how ironic etc. etc. that Stefan (Jourdan) wouldn't remember her at all. Showing what a user of women he was, how shallow and dishonest he was, and so force.  And while I can believe that he was all those things, I just cannot believe that he would not recall Joan at all. That's a sticking point for me with the film.

Well...

one *kinda* got the impression that Joan’s character was but one in a veritable “cast of thousands” for Louis. 

True story, I had a great uncle who was married six times and he ran into one of his ex-wives at a funeral and did not remember who she was. 

Oh, she was also one of his grade school teachers.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

THE CELLULOID CLOSET (1995) includes a moment from THE FOX in their montage of "gay characters killed in freakish ways as de facto punishment for their gayness," which was the highlight of the film for me....it takes a really offensive series of images and reduces them marvelously to camp, and what- quite frankly- could be gayer than that?

My take on her "death" was that she actually wanted it - because her lover, Ellen, had been unfaithful to her.

Yes, Ellen finally rejected Paul - but nothing quite stings like a lover's infidelity.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

okay- so- NONE SHALL ESCAPE (1944):

this was an incredibly powerful, imaginative, relentless and eye-opening film, one that would technically make a great companion piece to Douglas Sirk's HITLER'S MADMAN (1943)- although you'd probably have to undergo extensive lithium treatments if you watched them back to back.

and like HITLER'S MADMAN, I don't think I'll ever watch another film by the same director (in this case ANDRE DE TOTH) in the same way again- because it was so masterfully put together, so relentlessly uncompromising and constructed. it reminded me a trifle of WUTHERING HEIGHTS (the novel) in that it had a symmetrical structure- showing the mistakes of one generation being repeated by another.

it's the story of a Nazi on trial for war crimes in Poland, set in the future after WWII had ended (a bold move by the screenwriters)

there was an exceptional scene 2/3 of the way through where the local Polish Jews are being loaded onto a train for a Concentration Camp and revolt, only to be massacred. the camera movements and editing were incredible, I sat up and cried in horror when- quite clearly- a German officer's staff car runs over several bodies lying in the mud. how that got past the censors I don't know, but it was very effective.

the acting was superlative, MARSHA HUNT, who I knew as the dorky sister from PRIDE AND PREJUDICE (1940) ages so believably (the make-up was great!) in a vanity-free performance; HENRY TRAVERS was also good, but the real revelation for me was ALEXANDER KNOX- who I knew only from THE SEA WOLF and the WILSON (where I was not impressed by his Oscar-nominated role as an inexplicably British-accented Woodrow Wilson)- his German accent is perfect here. apparently they wanted PAUL LUKAS for the role, and thank God he didn't get it, because- as an actor- he was incapable of conveying what Knox did, the whole film hangs on his shoulders and he holds nothing back; it's a nuanced look into the banality of evil that doesn't resort to mustache twirling, a MOVIE STAR in the same role would have demanded rewrites to make the part sympathetic.

i was also stunned at how this film dealt openly with r a p e throughout.

highly recommended, especially for anyone who is conflicted about the current state of the world.

Have you ever seen "Kapo" with Susan Strasberg?

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

The Constant Nymph (1943).  I apparently recorded this film a long time ago as there as a TCM Shop ad preceding it telling me that Christmas was coming soon.  This was a strange film that I think I liked, but probably wouldn't watch again.  I recorded it mainly for the cast: Joan Fontaine, Charles Boyer, Alexis Smith, Peter Lorre and Charles Coburn--all people that I like.  

The Constant Nymph told the story of a composer (Boyer) who travels to Switzerland to reconnect with a family friend and his daughters.  One daughter in particular, Tessa (Fontaine), has had a lifetime crush on Boyer, but due to the fact that she's a child (I believe she's supposed to be 14-ish in the beginning of the film) and he's an adult, nothing is happening obviously.  Boyer is blind to Tessa's affection for him (as well he should be, imo).  Later, after their father dies, Tessa and her sister are sent to England to live with their wealthy uncle and cousin (Coburn and Smith, respectively).  This is after Coburn and Smith have visited Boyer and the girls in Switzerland to help get them ready to travel back to England.  Despite being a few years younger than Fontaine, Smith is cast as the sophisticated 20-something cousin of Fontaine.  Smith's height and wardrobe lends greatly to the illusion that she's much older than Fontaine and is her guardian.  Alexis Smith can wear a long "drapey" gown like nobody's business.

Fontaine was semi-believable as a teenager.  Despite being in her mid-20s when this was filmed, I bought her as a teenager, most of the time.  In the beginning of the movie, with her wet hair and simple dress, I bought her as a child. There were other scenes however, where her facial features most definitely didn't say kid and she just looked like a tiny adult. Her constant heart issues throughout the film provided foreshadowing too.

The Fontaine/Boyer relationship was odd.  It started out fairly innocent then devolved into something else that just seemed uncomfortable.  Smith's character was painted as a bit of a villain, but I fully sympathize with her.  Here she thought she was marrying the love of her life, who by the way can't even answer why he married her, and here's some kid trying to steal her husband.  Smith tried to brush it off as puppy love, but she begins to have her doubts (rightfully so).  I kept laughing when Smith, affecting an English accent, kept saying A-GAIN instead of A-Geyn.  Perhaps that is how some British speaking people pronounce that word, but Smith's pronunciation of "again" didn't match the rest of her speech.

I liked parts of this film but as a whole, I thought it was strange.  I loved Charles Coburn, he was funny.  I like how he kept calling one of the hired hands "Robert-O" instead of "Roberto."  I also liked Alexis Smith and Peter Lorre.  I liked Joan Fontaine most of the time in this film. 

I don't think I'll need to see this film again.

This film has a peculiar fascination for me.

It's due to the nature of the Joan Fontaine-Charles Boyer relationship.

Wasn't it Joan Fontaine's favorite film?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...