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5 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Was C. AUBREY SMITH ever not 104 years old?

LOL. He was ageless........

 

What was his first name anyway? Anyone know?

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37 minutes ago, Hibi said:

LOL. He was ageless........

 

What was his first name anyway? Anyone know?

Chthulhu. 

(Named after his great-uncle, the ancient beast of the depths)

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The Bishop Murder Case (1930) - Murder mystery from MGM and directors David Burton and Nick Grinde. When a man is found murdered with an arrow in his chest, the police enlist the aid of detective Philo Vance (Basil Rathbone) to crack the case.  His suspect pool is large, and the motives many and myriad, but he's the man for the job. Also featuring Leila Hyams, Roland Young, Alec B. Francis, George F. Marion, Zelda Sears, Delmer Daves, and Bodil Rosing.

Rathbone tries on the detective role and wears it with aplomb. Naturally it's hard to see him now and not think of him as Sherlock Holmes, and he displays many of the same traits in this earlier character. I've seen William Powell in the role of Philo Vance, but didn't invest a lot in it to care too much about the change in casting here. The mystery itself is interesting, although the sound is still sketchy due to the infancy of the technology. Overall, I enjoyed the film, and it should please mystery fans.   (7/10)

Source: TCM

bishopmurdercase1930_678x380_12052012020

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18 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

The Bishop Murder Case (1930) - Murder mystery from MGM and directors David Burton and Nick Grinde. When a man is found murdered with an arrow in his chest, the police enlist the aid of detective Philo Vance (Basil Rathbone) to crack the case.  His suspect pool is large, and the motives many and myriad, but he's the man for the job. Also featuring Leila Hyams, Roland Young, Alec B. Francis, George F. Marion, Zelda Sears, Delmer Daves, and Bodil Rosing.

Rathbone tries on the detective role and wears it with aplomb. Naturally it's hard to see him now and not think of him as Sherlock Holmes, and he displays many of the same traits in this earlier character. I've seen William Powell in the role of Philo Vance, but didn't invest a lot in it to care too much about the change in casting here. The mystery itself is interesting, although the sound is still sketchy due to the infancy of the technology. Overall, I enjoyed the film, and it should please mystery fans.   (7/10)

bishopmurdercase1930_678x380_12052012020

Is Rathbone charming in the role,  having any flair?   Now I'm not expecting the Powell type persona,  but I do wonder if Rathbone comes off as being a little too serious   (of course my question is influenced by the photo).

 

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11 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Is Rathbone charming in the role,  having any flair?   Now I'm not expecting the Powell type persona,  but I do wonder if Rathbone comes off as being a little too serious   (of course my question is influenced by the photo).

Yes, he's more serious than Powell. Powell was also just a tad bit foppish as Vance, I thought, amusingly so, whereas Rathbone is largely all business. He's very reminiscent of Holmes in many ways here. Always a few steps ahead, and with a tinge of condescension to the slower-witted people around him.

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2 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Always a few steps ahead, and with tinge of condescension to the slower-witted people around him.

Hmm ... reminds me of an old-time poster who is no longer around ...

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56 minutes ago, Spritz Nipper said:

Charles_Aubrey_Smith_c1895.jpg

Cthulhu Aubrey Smith, circa 1895.

You know, I was gonna make a joke about whether he was holding an apple or a baseball ... until I found out he did play cricket!

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The Lady of Scandal (1930) - Romantic comedy from MGM and director Sidney Franklin. A stuffy English family is scandalized when the youngest son, John (Ralph Forbes), announces his engagement to "lowly" actress Elsie (Ruth Chatterton). They are determined to see the marriage thwarted, but things get more complicated when older son Edward (Basil Rathbone) falls for Elsie's charms, too. Also featuring Nance O'Neil, Frederick Kerr, Herbert Bunston, Cyril Chadwick, Effie Ellsler, Robert Bolder, Moon Carroll, Mackenzie Ward, and Edgar Norton.

This is one of a glut of stage adaptations that followed the advent of sound and the emphasis suddenly became on dialogue. There are a lot of witty lines, and Chatterton and Rathbone are both good, but I enjoyed Frederick Kerr the most. Perhaps best remembered as Dr. Frankenstein's father in the 1931 film, Kerr is an almost non-stop source of hilarity as he blurts out pointed barbs at everyone around him. The film is still a bit stagy, and many may grow bored with it, but I liked it.    (7/10)

Source: TCM

26e2675dc8ffdd0ef08bb5338afdfece--old-mo

 

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4 hours ago, Spritz Nipper said:

Charles_Aubrey_Smith_c1895.jpg

Cthulhu Aubrey Smith, circa 1895.

He actually was young once! AMAZING.

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23 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Quick Millions (1931) - Excellent gangster pic from Fox and director Rowland Brown.

Source: YouTube. The copy there is atrocious, hazy and with onscreen Spanish subtitles throughout the film.

220px-Quick_Millions_FilmPoster.jpeg

 

Don't ruin your eyes watching all of these old Fox films. I've gotten my copies from different sources, and usually if the film is from the 30s or earlier my print is atrocious too. It's like a bad VHS copy of a bad print. I wonder if these films' originals were lost in the Fox vault fire and thus this is all that is left. Fox has confused me with what they have put out on their DVD-R series of their classic films. Much of the stuff that they put out from the 1930s is stuff with second tier stars and titles I have never heard before. Maybe they don't do more with Spencer Tracy's films at Fox because original prints no longer exist.

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Montana Moon (1930) - Clunky mash-up of high society rom-com and musical western, from MGM and director Malcolm St. Clair. Spoiled rich girl Joan (Joan Crawford) loves to party with her socialite crowd, but when circumstances put her with simple cowboy Larry (Johnny Mack Brown), the two fall in love. Their romance is quickly challenged as they attempt to fit into each other's very different ways of life. Also featuring Cliff Edwards, Dorothy Sebastian, Ricardo Cortez, Benny Rubin, Lloyd Ingraham, and Karl Dane.

The film can't quite figure out what it wants to be, and the script seems sewn together from disparate fragments. Crawford is lovely, and does a sexy dance with Ricardo Cortez. Brown is still an awful actor, but his dull delivery fits a bit more with this character. Lengthy stretches are taken up by the comedy and musical antics of Edwards and Rubin. The IMDb trivia for this says that this is the first film to introduce the concept of the "singing cowboy", but I don't know if that's true or not.    (5/10)

Source: TCM

220px-Montanamoon11janx.jpg

montanamoon_notionsofdecency_FC_470x264_

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2 hours ago, Hibi said:

(CTHULHU AUBREY SMITH) actually was young once! AMAZING.

And HOT.

That’s right, I said it.

C. was a STONE COLD FOX back in the 1700s or whenever the hell that picture was taken.

I mean it, take your fingers and cover up the hat because that hat is terrible. But underneath the hat, hell yeah I would. MUSTACHE OR NO.

AND THOSE MAN PAWS!!!!

10/10 would smash. 

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And here I was only thinking it a bit coincidental that those two old British actors sporting those prominent aquiline noses of theirs, namely Messrs. Rathbone and Aubrey Smith, had ended up appearing on the very same page in this thread.

 

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7 hours ago, Spritz Nipper said:

Charles_Aubrey_Smith_c1895.jpg

Cthulhu Aubrey Smith, circa 1895.

I'm actually impressed. Your next challenge, if you choose to accept it...is there any evidence (photographic or otherwise) that Lewis Stone was ever young? Even in his silent days he looked "mature."

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1 minute ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

cd36748efbba81a30bec225d5600eccf--actor-“Young” Lewis Stone. Doesn’t even appeal to me.

To each their own. I'd hit it, but I'm so man-hungry my standards are not exactly exacting.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

And HOT.

That’s right, I said it.

C. was a STONE COLD FOX back in the 1700s or whenever the hell that picture was taken.

I mean it, take your fingers and cover up the hat because that hat is terrible. But underneath the hat, hell yeah I would. MUSTACHE OR NO.

AND THOSE MAN PAWS!!!!

10/10 would smash. 

That cricket photo of C. Aubrey Smith looks exactly how I would picture a 19th century man.  Giant mustache and very strong features.  Some Classic Hollywood stars have looks that wouldn't be out of place now, they're very modern, then there are those who are very much of their time.  C. Aubrey Smith is one of them.  Mae West is another. 

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40 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

cd36748efbba81a30bec225d5600eccf--actor-“Young” Lewis Stone. Doesn’t even appeal to me.

I think he's wearing a rug! The hair on top doesn't match the hair on the sides.  And why is there that ridge? 

It's a no from me as well.

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0081754224e0a9aebca4673ebdd8c78c.jpg

Young William Frawley looks like Elmer Fudd.  I think he looks better older.  I swear William Frawley, like Elizabeth Patterson, remained exactly the same age from 1935 through 1960. 

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The Todd Killings (1971) Directed by Barry Shear

51tbCimh2SL._SY445_.jpg

It's on a well known streaming site also but in the old tv ratio looks like a multi generated copy of a VHS tape. The film is surprisingly well made, you'd think it would taken the easy route and had been more juvenile given the subject and the time period, but no, it's a serious treatment of the subject matter. 

It at times felt like an updated Psycho and a little bit of Ace In The Hole thrown in with an antagonist who looks like Peter Fonda.

It actually comes off well. Gloria Grahame and Barbra Bel Geddes are nice to see out of their usual '40-50's milieu and Richard Thomas and Robert F. Lyons (as Skipper Todd) are great. 

It may be worth a purchase just to see it in the correct aspect ratio. 

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Paid (1930) - Mildly entertaining Pre-Code crime drama from MGM and director Sam Wood. Shopgirl Mary Turner (Joan Crawford) is framed for embezzlement and sent to prison for 3 years, where she studies the law. When she gets out, she teams up with former cellmate Agnes (Marie Prevost) and slick criminal Joe Garson (Robert Armstrong) to squeeze people for all they're worth, but within the law. Mary also plans revenge against the powerful man who sent her up the river. Also featuring Douglass Montgomery, John Miljan, Purnell Pratt, Hale Hamilton, Robert Emmett O'Connor, Gwen Lee, Edward Brophy, and Louise Beavers taking a shower.

Crawford plays her role with gusto, and she's better in her hard-bitten scenes than her fragile emotional ones, shades of her later career path. Prevost is fun as the comic sidekick. The early Women-In-Prison section should have been longer.   (6/10)

Source: TCM

220px-Paid30poster.jpg

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