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6 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I caught THREE ON A MATCH (1931?) this morning, I'd seen it before, but it's a memorable and engrossing film- a PRE-CODE WOMEN'S PICTURE, if you will (although no one goes to prison, even though JOAN BLONDELL is in it.)

it's about the disparate fortunes of three girls in the years leading up to the early thirties, permeated at each passing of time leading to the present with a charming montage of popular songs, newspaper headlines and landmark events of the eras...really, that frequent device is, I think, the most charming and engrossing part of the movie, which is something, because JOAN BLONDELL is really charming and engrossing herself, as is ANN DVORAK in a really complicated, demanding part that is easier to understand and appreciate in this day and age.

Oddly, BETTE DAVIS is the third of the trio demanded by the title, and her role is terrible, like as bad as it is in WATERLOO BRIDGE- in that she has, like a dozen lines of the "will you pass the salt?' variety and is in it for all of seven or eight minutes, she also has to share scenes with an ADORABLE CHILD ACTOR which I AM SURE PIS SED HER OFF TO NO END, However, she looks TERRIFIC (really, I don't think she was ever lovelier than she is in this film) and has one of those charming "THIS HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH THE PLOT, BUT ENJOY IT ANYWAY" PRECODE motifs wherein she strips down to her slip while talking to a roommate in a scene. 

LYLE TALBOT was handsome, WARREN WILLIAM as well, although he is sadly not a lothario in this one.

the child actor is TERMINALLY ADORABLE.

the title refers to the idea that lighting three cigarettes with one match is bad luck (one will die) and then explains the notion was devised by a match manufacturer to make people use more matches.

it's also interesting that of the three, DVORAK faded not long after, BLONDELL maintained mid-level stardom for decades and BETTE of course became immortal in spite of her glaringly limited role here.

I saw this too this morning! It is great how Warner Brothers packs a powerful precode story into just one hour.  Interesting that just seven months later WB released "The Match King" starring Warren William about the very guy who supposedly came up with the tale about three on a match being bad luck.  Yes, it couldn't be said even in the precode era, but what Dvorak's character seemed to be looking for was sexual adventure, and she was bored with her husband. She was also shown to be flighty and looking for romantic highs that just generally can't be sustained over time, even as a younger woman. Poor Bette Davis. Her character seems to be an object lesson in how always being the straight arrow just keeps you unnoticed, alone, and in low paying jobs.

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The Horrible Dr. Hichcock (1962) - Italian horror from Panda Film and director Riccardo Freda. In 1885 London, Professor Bernard Hichcock (Robert Flemyng) is a respected physician, but after his wife dies, he finds himself unable to let her go, and still lusts after her body which is kept in the basement crypt. He later marries again, to Cinzia (Barbara Steele), but he soon starts trying to drive her mad, convincing her that the ghost of his first wife is tormenting her. Also featuring Silvano Tranquilli, Maria Teresa Vianello, and Harriet Medin.

This takes the full-color, Gothic romance atmosphere of a Hammer film and adds some taboo perversion to the mix. Steele gets to be the damsel in distress this time, rather than the one causing distress. I enjoyed the film, but I tend to like these 60's Euro-horrors from Italy.   (7/10)

Source: YouTube

dr-hichcock.jpg

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57 minutes ago, calvinnme said:

It is not on DVD and it was scheduled a few months back for TCM, but then pulled from the schedule. This youtube copy looks better than I've ever seen it, so some professional restoration must have been done. Like I said, the only bad thing about the copy is that the sound is very weak, although it is cleaner than I've ever heard it.

I briefly saw a bit of it with Myrna Loy doing a naughty dance. It was a long way for her from screen siren to mother of the year in Best Years of Our Lives.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I caught THREE ON A MATCH (1931?) this morning, I'd seen it before, but it's a memorable and engrossing film- a PRE-CODE WOMEN'S PICTURE, if you will (although no one goes to prison, even though JOAN BLONDELL is in it.)

it's about the disparate fortunes of three girls in the years leading up to the early thirties, permeated at each passing of time leading to the present with a charming montage of popular songs, newspaper headlines and landmark events of the eras...really, that frequent device is, I think, the most charming and engrossing part of the movie, which is something, because JOAN BLONDELL is really charming and engrossing herself, as is ANN DVORAK in a really complicated, demanding part that is easier to understand and appreciate in this day and age.

Oddly, BETTE DAVIS is the third of the trio demanded by the title, and her role is terrible, like as bad as it is in WATERLOO BRIDGE- in that she has, like a dozen lines of the "will you pass the salt?' variety and is in it for all of seven or eight minutes, she also has to share scenes with an ADORABLE CHILD ACTOR which I AM SURE PIS SED HER OFF TO NO END, However, she looks TERRIFIC (really, I don't think she was ever lovelier than she is in this film) and has one of those charming "THIS HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH THE PLOT, BUT ENJOY IT ANYWAY" PRECODE motifs wherein she strips down to her slip while talking to a roommate in a scene.

LYLE TALBOT was handsome, WARREN WILLIAM as well, although he is sadly not a lothario in this one.

the child actor is TERMINALLY ADORABLE.

the title refers to the idea that lighting three cigarettes with one match is bad luck (one will die) and then explains the notion was devised by a match manufacturer to make people use more matches.

it's also interesting that of the three, DVORAK faded not long after, BLONDELL maintained mid-level stardom for decades and BETTE of course became immortal in spite of her glaringly limited role here.

I love Three on a Match, in fact, it was the reason I purchased the Forbidden Hollywood Collection Vol 2 when I saw it at one of the used movie stores I frequent.  This collection also has the amazing Night Nurse on it as well, so it was a win-win all around.  

But I really liked Three on a Match.  Pre-codes can be a fascinating look at the early days of Hollywood sound films and with the added bonus of some racy content (in comparison with production code films), they can be very enjoyable.  However, sometimes these films can also be a bit creaky, or not as scandalous as one would hope, or sometimes they're kind of lame, as they don't live up to their title (Illicit comes to mind).  Also for every Barbara Stanwyck or Joan Blondell that shine in their roles, there are a lot of actors who are either dull, or overact to the point of being irritating.  Three on a Match however is a solid 63-min film that entertains from beginning to end--and it's short! 

I loved Ann Dvorak in this film and I wish she'd had a longer career.  Bette's role wasn't significant, but I love her, so she was a welcome addition to the cast.  Warren William doesn't really do anything for me, but he was fine in this film.  I found nothing objectionable about him.  Lyle Talbot to me seems like another George Brent or Kent Smith--an actor who is fine, turns in a serviceable performance and is reliable--but nothing about him is overly compelling or captivating. Joan Blondell is one of my favorites and is long overdue for a SOTM tribute by TCM.  However, with Glenda Farrell being honored next month, there are a ton of Blondell films featured.  I don't know if TCM would honor Blondell so soon after Farrell, since many of their films are the same.  Maybe I can hope for a SUTS day. 

I also loved Humphrey Bogart's short role in this film.  Dare I say it, I actually thought Bogie was kind of cute in this film? I know he's not thought of as being one of Hollywood's handsomest leading men, but before he started aging rapidly, I can find his appeal, even if he's no Errol Flynn.

 33durlv.jpg

I'm digging this look on Bogie.  

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YES, BOGART was very sexy in this, and excellent too. He'd be furious, but not surprised, that I overlooked him.

LYLE TALBOT later played THE GENERAL in PLAN NINE FROM OUTER SPACE, and that is always at the forefront of my mind when I see him in something...he was handsome as Hell in his prime though.

 

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ps- i loved that in the montage set during the Prohibition Era, they played the popular tune How Dry I Am, which is what drunken characters in Warner Bros, cartoons have warbled a time or two with a hiccup interspersed.

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4 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

YES, BOGART was very sexy in this, and excellent too. He'd be furious, but not surprised, that I overlooked him.

LYLE TALBOT later played THE GENERAL in PLAN NINE FROM OUTER SPACE, and that is always at the forefront of my mind when I see him in something...he was handsome as Hell in his prime though.

 

Did you ever see the short TCM promo piece that had him in it? He looked pretty ill at the time, and it must have been made early in TCM's days because Talbot died in 1996. He actually lived a very long life, dying at age 94.

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Just now, calvinnme said:

Did you ever see the short TCM promo piece that had him in it? He looked pretty ill at the time, and it must have been made early in TCM's days because Talbot died in 1996. He actually lived a very long life, dying at age 94.

POSSIBLY..I can't recall who or what specifically he was discussing. i've watched footage of an old premiere and want to he he came as the escort of NORMA SHEARER and is referred to as "HOLLYWOO'D FAVORITE LADIES MAN LYLE TALBOT" or something of some such type.

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20 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

YES, BOGART was very sexy in this, and excellent too. He'd be furious, but not surprised, that I overlooked him.

LYLE TALBOT later played THE GENERAL in PLAN NINE FROM OUTER SPACE, and that is always at the forefront of my mind when I see him in something...he was handsome as Hell in his prime though.

 

I thought Bogart was cute in The Petrified Forest too.  I even like him in Casablanca! Maybe it's the white dinner jacket.  As he aged, he started taking on more of the basset hound look, so physically, he lost some of his appeal.  However, he still had his fantastic voice and charisma. 

Lyle Talbot, while I do agree that he's attractive, reminds me of a pre-code Glenn Ford.

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20 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

BETTE DAVIS in THREE ON A MATCH:

04a7e576407af70186a0ef331a7008f1.jpg

What a cute bathing suit! I'd wear that now.  Of course, I'd have to start an extensive jogging regimen to get Bette's figure.  I refuse to take up Bette's smoking habit, which no doubt assisted in helping her keep her figure. 

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Premature Burial (1962) - Eastmancolor horror from AIP and director Roger Corman. In the 19th century, wealthy Guy Carrell (Ray Milland) has a pathological fear of being buried alive, partially based on the fact that his family has a history of developing a cataleptic illness that mimics the symptoms of death, leading to several of Guy's ancestors being prematurely interred. Guy's new wife Emily (Hazel Court) hopes to cure her husband of his phobia. Also featuring Richard Ney, Alan Napier, Heather Angel, John Dierkes, and Dick Miller.

Although I've seen all of the other Corman/Edgar Allan Poe movies, I just never got around to this one, perhaps due to the absence of Vincent Price. This one was set up at another studio than AIP, who had released all of the other ones, thanks to Corman feuding with the AIP brass. However, AIP swooped in and bought the film back just as shooting got underway. This has the same nice cinematography and production values as the other Poe films, and Ray Milland really digs into his role, particularly during the final act. I wouldn't call it my favorite of the cycle (that would be The Haunted Palace), but I enjoyed it nonetheless.   (7/10)

Source: YouTube

burial_poster.jpg?ssl=1

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I believe Lyle Talbot's son played Beaver's friend Gilbert in Leave it to Beaver

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"The Fearless Vampire Killers" or "Pardon Me, But Your Teeth Are In My Neck" - Roman Polanski - 1967 -

I hate to offer a negative opinion of this film, because Roman Polanski is one of my favorite filmmakers -

but this film is a very bad spoof of vampire films -

it is extremely energetic and in constant motion -

but it just is not funny -

or even that interesting -

the large cast is serviceable and tries, tries, tries -

the standouts are Roman Polanski himself as the professor's assistant -

and Iain Quarrier as the gay vampire Herbert von Krolock -

and, of course, the film's star, Jack MacGowran -

vampiros_2.jpg

(Herbert von Krolock is sexual innuendo for what is happening to Herbert in the assistant's presence.)

(Are you laughing?)

 

 

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Heavens Above! (1963) - British comedy from British-Lion and producer-directors John & Roy Boulting. A clerical error results in Reverend John Smallwood (Peter Sellers) being assigned to be a town's new parish vicar. He runs into rampant hypocrisy in the face of his efforts to shepherd his flock into living a more Christian lifestyle, rather than just paying lip service. This causes controversy and sparks outrage among the more conservative townsfolk. Also featuring Cecil Parker, Isabel Jeans, Brock Peters, Ian Carmichael, Bernard Miles, Eric Sykes, Irene Handl, Miles Malleson, Roy Kinnear, William Hartnell, Kenneth Griffith, Elsie Wagstaff, and Joan Hickson.

Sellers is outstanding in the lead role, and while this film is a comedy, he's not playing a fool or a slapstick buffoon. This is one of the more reserved and realistic portrayals from him that I've seen, and his cheerful, positive priest is a joy. The large cast of supporting players are all enjoyable, too. The film's depiction of the chasm between those who claim to be faithful Christians and how they then go about their lives, is relevant even today, if not more so. There are a lot of laughs, but there's some sting in there, too.   (7/10)

Source: FilmStruck

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As several of you mentioned, it's amazing how much story is packed into the sixty-some minutes of Three on a Match. (And how little story is packed into a two-and-a-half-hour yawner today.) Lorna, what a beautiful picture of Bette. Mervyn LeRoy, who directed Three on a Match, predicted major stardom for two of the three ladies: Joan Blondell and Ann Dvorak. Both are terrific in the film, and Bette does have the "nice girl" role. No wonder she fought to get Of Human Bondage.

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MV5BNjI0NDUwNTQ0NV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNzIwOTkzNDE@._V1_UX182_CR0,0,182,268_AL_.jpg***SPOILERS***


Make Way For Tomorrow (1937).  I recorded this film off TCM a while back, and it had been living on my DVR for awhile.  I always saw this movie on the shelves during Barnes & Noble's Criterion Sale.  I liked the cover art.  I finally watched this film last night.  This was one of the sweetest and saddest movies I have watched in a while.  It ranks right up there with Up.  

Make Way For Tomorrow was directed by LeoMcCarey and released the same year as his Oscar-winning film, The Awful Truth.  In fact, upon accepting the Oscar, McCarey reportedly said that he was given the Oscar for the wrong film.  From what I've read, McCarey considers this film one of his masterpieces.  It is a beautiful film.  I wonder if the lack of star power and/or the depressing storyline hurt its success at the box office.  This film (among many others) proves why box office success shouldn't be used as an indicator of a film's quality.

Beulah Bondi and Victor Moore play elderly couple, Lucy and Barkley Cooper.  At the beginning of the film, we see the elderly couple and 4/5 of their grown, middle aged children assembling for some sort of announcement.  It seems that the Great Depression has wiped Lucy and Barkley out.  The bank will be foreclosing on their home next week.  It seems that Lucy and Barkley had known for a few months that they were losing their home, but didn't let their children know, hoping that something would turn up. This theme of ungrounded optimism will be a recurring theme throughout the film.  I have the sense that deep-down, Lucy and Barkley knew that they were going to have to turn to their children for help.  I think pride prevented them from doing so until they ran out of time and were forced to tell them, otherwise, they'd be homeless.

The children, George (Thomas Mitchell), Cora (Elizabeth Risdon), Nellie (Minna Gombell), and Robert (Ray Mayer) are shocked by their parents' announcement and then are forced to awkwardly discuss what to do in front of their parents.  Both George and Cora state that they have room in their home, but only for one parent.  Nellie, who seemingly has room in her home for her parents, will not commit.  Robert doesn't participate in the discussion at all and seems more interested in making fun of his sister than actually discussing this serious situation with his siblings.  In the end, it is decided that Lucy will move into George's NYC apartment with his wife and daughter, and Barkley will move into Cora's home 300 miles upstate.  Honestly, looking at George's apartment, which I didn't even realize was an apartment until a character said so, George, I think has the money and space for both parents.  He has a maid! The separation between the parents is supposed to last only a few months--but you know it'll end up being permanent.  This film just seems like the type of film where that will happen.

Anyway, throughout much of the film, we see the parents, children, in-laws and grandchildren all trying to co-exist with one another.  Lucy's arrival to her son's home completely disrupts her daughter-in-law Anita's (Fay Bainter) social life.  Granddaughter Rhoda (Barbara Read), who's about to turn 18, is completely embarrassed by her grandmother and won't bring her boyfriends and friends to the home.  Anita is concerned because she no longer meets Rhoda's boyfriends and has no idea who her daughter is galavanting around with.  We see Rhoda rebelling, such as when she goes to the movies with Lucy and then sneaks out to meet a boy.  Later, Rhoda leaves the home to go meet some 35-year old man.  Lucy knows about both instances, but in an effort to keep a relationship with her granddaughter, she stays mum, until she's forced to tell Anita.  At some point in the film, Rhoda stays out all night until the family receives a phone call in the morning telling them to pick Rhoda up.  We are not told what happened, only that Anita has a contact who will somehow keep Rhoda's name out of the papers.  I am speculating that either a) Rhoda was caught having underage sex in the car or perhaps b ) she was picked up intoxicated and thrown into the drunk tank. 

Anita resents Lucy's presence in her home, because she seems to interfere with her social life.  Anita it seems teaches a weekly bridge class and dislikes Lucy hanging around.  It seems that Lucy's attempts to be friendly are disruptive to Anita's teachings and perhaps, more importantly, disruptive to Anita's attempts to maintain an image of upper class.  Lucy's from an earlier generation where women don't drink in public and things are simpler. There is a very emotional scene where Lucy takes a phone call from her husband and speaks loudly during the bridge class, disrupting it.  

Cora forces her father to sleep on her couch and acts like his presence in her home is a complete inconvenience.  Her husband is irritated that his father in law is there.  I get the sense that Cora feels like she was forced to board her father, as none of her other siblings were chomping at the bit to take them in.  Barkley ends up catching a bad cold and has to deal with having a young doctor trying to care for him.  Barkley proves to be a tough patient as he feels like this doctor isn't old enough to be practicing.  Prior to getting ill, Barkley had met and befriended the local drugstore clerk, a gentle man of Eastern European descent.  He is completely happy with his life, despite not having any children.  Barkley asks him about his lack of children, and he essentially says that as long as he has his store and his wife, he is completely content.  I get the sense that the man loves his store because it gives him a niche in his community. 

Nellie, I sense feels guilty about not taking her parents in, as she's the one with enough room and money to be able to keep them together.  Her husband is adamant that he will not live with her parents, telling her that he married her, not her parents.  Meanwhile, they're going out to dinner with his mother.

Barkley's illness forces Cora to contact the unseen sister, Addy, who lives out in California.  Cora gets Addy to agree to take Barkley into her home--again, only one parent can be accomodated.  Cora presents this plan to Barkley under the guise that the California weather will keep him from getting sick.  But we know that Cora is just trying to get him out of her house.  Meanwhile, Nellie takes Lucy to the "Home for the Aged" under the ruse that she can meet some nice women her own age.  Nellie keeps hyping up how nice the home is and how lovely it is.  Lucy writes about this to Barkley and you, as the audience get the impression that Nellie is really trying to move Lucy into an old folks home, without explicitly saying so.  

At the end of the film, Lucy and Barkley, at this point having been separated more than three months, are getting together for the afternoon before Barkley's train leaves for California.  They have five hours to spend together.  Their children are planning a dinner for them.  Lucy and Barkley spend an hour or so walking through Central Park in NYC and end up getting a ride to the hotel where they spent their honeymoon.  A car salesman saw them through his store window and figuring that they're old, so they must be rich, he approaches them with the intent of selling them a vehicle.  He offers to give them a test ride in his own vehicle.  The couple, thinking he was just a nice man, agree.  While talking to each other in the car, they decide to go to their old honeymoon hotel and asks the man to drive them.  He's so charmed by them, he agrees.  Even after he admits to them his original reason for driving them, you get the sense that he was honored to drive them to dinner.

While at the old hotel, the couple have the time of their lives together.  Lucy drinks in public for the first time.  She and Barkley do a waltz.  They spend the evening eating, drinking, reminiscing and laughing.  The hotel owner is so charmed by them, he spends much time talking to them and comps them their entire visit.  Meanwhile the children are waiting for their parents.  Not so much worried about them, more upset that the roast will get ruined and that they're essentially wasting their time.  We see Barkley call the kids to tell them that he and Lucy will not be attending their dinner. Then he says something to them in the phone that we don't hear.  Later, it turns out that he essentially ripped them a new one for being ungrateful and selfish. 

The scene at the hotel is the cutest and sweetest scene in the whole film.  The subject of their separation or money troubles isn't mentioned.  All we hear about is how they spent their honeymoon and their lives before children.  When the time comes for the couple to separate, there is a bittersweet feeling.  There is a very real chance that either half of the couple could pass on before seeing each other again.  Barkley's "It's been very nice knowing you" and Lucy's "Thank you for 50 wonderful years" goodbyes were heartwrenching.  

I read that the Paramount boss wanted McCarey to make the ending happy--like someone magically found room for the couple to be together, or Barkley doesn't leave, or something to that effect.  I'm glad that McCarey stuck with this ending.  Nothing else would have worked.  An upbeat, happy ending would have ruined the film--and been almost a cop-out. 

This was a beautiful film.  Bondi was amazing as the elderly Lucy.  It was also interesting in that although we should dislike the children, their reasons for not wanting their parents in their households are legitimate and valid reasons.  Cora is a bit of a witch, but I did empathize with Anita.  If only, because she seemed like the type of woman who ran a very tight ship, with every minute scheduled, while trying to maintain an image of high society.  Lucy's attempts to fit in and be part of the household do not go over well, because she's not part of Anita's routine. George is really the only "kid" who comes off the best, just because he seemingly wanted to help his parents, but perhaps didn't want to really upset Anita by taking in both parents. 

I do not think however, that I would ever need to own this film.  I don't see myself wanting to watch this over and over. 

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The Wrong Arm of the Law (1963) - British crime comedy from British-Lion and director Cliff Owen. A trio of Australian crooks arrive in London and start impersonating police officers in order to rob other criminals. Local crime boss Pearly Gates (Peter Sellers) decides to try an unlikely tactic: brokering a truce with Scotland Yard until the two groups can catch the phony coppers and put them away for good. Also featuring Lionel Jeffries, Bernard Cribbens, Davy Kaye, Nanette Newman, Bill Kerr, Ed Devereaux, Reg Lye, John Le Mesurier, Graham Starke, Martin Boddey, Tutte Lemkow, Dennis Price, and Michael Caine.

Sellers turns in another low-key, straight performance that still manages to elicit laughs. Jeffries, as a bumbling police inspector, and Cribbens as a high-strung rival gangster, are also stand-outs. An enjoyable, character-driven comedy that doesn't resort to cheap slapstick, but rather a witty script and good performances.   (7/10)

Source: FilmStruck

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The Cloud-Capped Star (1960) - Indian musical drama from writer-producer-director Ritwik Ghatak. A poor family struggles to survive on the salary of the eldest daughter, Neeta (Supriya Choudhury). Elder son Shankar (Anil Chatterjee) brings some light into their lives with his singing, although his dreams of a musical career mean less food on the table now. Also featuring Gyanesh Mukherjee, Bijon Bhattacharya, Gita Ghatak, Dwiju Bhawai, Niranjan Ray, and Gita Dey.

The music is classical Indian songs, so don't fear any type of Bollywood dance numbers. The family's situation is dire, but there's still plenty of humor, although I found most of it awkward. Choudhury is luminous and saintly, perhaps too much so, in the lead.   (7/10)

bfi-00n-mis-the-cloud-capped-star.jpg?it

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On 10/14/2018 at 2:49 PM, rayban said:

"The Fearless Vampire Killers" or "Pardon Me, But Your Teeth Are In My Neck" - Roman Polanski - 1967 -

I hate to offer a negative opinion of this film, because Roman Polanski is one of my favorite filmmakers -

but it just is not funny -

As much as Polanski can direct eerie paranoid suspense...his idea of "comedy" is something that seems to have come from some remote alien Baltic eastern-European country, where they love clowns and slapstick, and never quite translated to the Western Hemisphere.  Much like the English-impaired foreign actors he hires for it, before loading them down with wigs, teeth and makeup.

Even knowing the best-known scenes, I tried to get halfway into TFVKoPMBYFAIMN, and now I'm actually afraid to watch Walter Matthau in "Pirates" (1986).  Which, from what I can gather from the reviews, wasn't much improvement, even though Matthau actually can speak English.

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Mediterranee (1963) - French arthouse short film from directors Jean-Daniel Pollet and Volker Schlondorff. Images of the Mediterranean Sea are juxtaposed against ruins both ancient and then-fairly-recent (WW2 bunkers), as well images of various people going about mundane tasks. There's also a repeated sequence of a comatose young woman on a gurney being slowly pushed through a hospital, and frequent scenes of a bullfight, including a profusely bleeding bull that is killed, the coup de grace being shown from various angles.

I've voiced my absolute disgust with bullfighting in the past, and this film is a good illustration of why. Beyond that, I'm not sure what meaning, if any, the directors had in mind, as the infrequent narration is a load of pretentious twaddle. The cinematography is nice, but not worth the 45 minutes of your life that you won't get back.   (4/10)

MV5BZDI1ZGU5ZmUtNWU5OS00M2VjLTg4ZTUtMjky

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A joke of a horror movie "The Robot vs the Aztec Mummy" (1957) Where is the key to wind the "robot" up? :lol:

61GUZ7SkSxL._SX466_.jpg

Solution to the mummy, petrol and a match.  Man with the wrinkled face, a large jar of moisturizer.  Geeze this guy would scare better.

funny-wrinkled-man.jpg

 

2 hours wasted.

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20 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I believe Lyle Talbot's son played Beaver's friend Gilbert in Leave it to Beaver

Yes. That's correct.

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14 hours ago, EricJ said:

As much as Polanski can direct eerie paranoid suspense...his idea of "comedy" is something that seems to have come from some remote alien Baltic eastern-European country, where they love clowns and slapstick, and never quite translated to the Western Hemisphere.  Much like the English-impaired actors he hires for it, before loading them down with wigs, teeth and makeup.

Even knowing the best-known scenes, I tried to get halfway into TFVKoPMBYTAIMN, and now I'm actually afraid to watch Walter Matthau in "Pirates" (1986).  Which, from what I can gather from the reviews, wasn't much improvement, even though Matthau actually can speak English.

His idea of comedy seems to be - keep it in motion - and keep it zany - it will be funny.

I don't think that the scriptwriters - Roman Polanski and Gerard Brach - were conversant in English.

Perhaps that's the problem.

pegasus_LARGE_t_241061_14341767_type1249

(This set piece is meant to be funny, but it elicits no laughs.)

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I never saw the Polanski film, but did see Matthau's  "Pirates".  It was OK, but too full( for my taste) of a lot of pirate movie costume and scenario cliches.  I always thought of it as a SPOOF of the pirate movie genre.  ;)

Sepiatone

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