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10 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

I don't think so. In Jason X, he uses axes, knives and even skewers people on futuristic piston looking things in the spaceship. 

Um, way to forget the LIQUID NITROGEN scene!

(no, seriously, How did you manage to put that out of your mind? I would love to be able to forget it)

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i tried to watch THE OLD DARK HOUSE (1932) on Wednesday, but my sound went out of sync as it so often does.

it was the only KARLOFF film of the night to be offered on TCM ON DEMAND, I am kind of bummed about how few horror titles have been placed ON DEMAND this October, BUT I WATCHED IT LAST NIGHT.

The POSTAGE STAMP FORMAT that seems to plague the ON DEMAND titles annoyed me, but i rolled with it.

such an odd damn movie- a bit of a challenge to get through the first 20-30 minutes, which are salvaged by the cast- EVA "WHERE'S THE PEPPER AND SALT?" MOORE wins MVP for me, which isn't easy when you're opposite ERNEST THESIGER, but I could watch the scene where she CONSUMES her dinner with a knife and fork with pure mechanical precision on a ten hour loop- had it been her character trapped in the feeding machine-gone-haywire scene from MODERN TIMES, she'd've reduced that sucker to the scrap heap in an hour. Her character is SUCH  a wizened, spiteful, hate-filled old crone and I adore her.

the-old-dark-house-1932-3.jpg

Most Everyone else is EXCELLENT- LAUGHTON is a bit heavy at first (it was his first film) but he soon reveals the talent that would make him an enduring star, LILLIAN BOND is a charmer, MELVYN DOUGLAS is MELVYN DOUGLAS and it works, and KARLOFF THE UNCANNY stood out to me last night in his brief but memorable screen time. I really enjoy the dubbed-in sound his character makes, sounds a little like 'ablugahblahablugah.'

the only one in the cast I don't like is RAYMOND MASSEY. Sue me, but I've never liked Raymond Massey.

as a film and a story, it's constructed a bit like the haphazard series of staircases that feature in the set- zigzagging  ever upwards and seemingly none-too-sturdily at that - but the last 10 minutes are good enough to remind me of why I always sit and give this one a looksie.

Have a potato.

 

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18 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Roughshod (1949) Director: Mark Robson, stars: Robert Sterling, Gloria Grahame and John Ireland

Roughshod Poster

Three convicts Lednov (John Ireland) and two buddies break out of prison, shoot down three cowboys and steal their clothes. Ludnov wants revenge on Clay Phillips (Robert Sterling).

Clay Phillips hears about the escape. He and his young brother though have been planing on leaving town to take a herd of horses to Sonora to sell. Out on the road they come across four cat house girls Mary Wells (Gloria Grahame) and her friends, Elaine, Helen and Marcia, who were forced out of town by the reform element. They are heading the same way but have a broken wheel on their buggy. One of the girls boyfriends shows and Marcia leaves with him to get married. Clay takes the remaining girls on to the nearest ranch, where it turns out one of the girls Elaine is the homesteader's wayward daughter. 

As Clay already knows that one of the cons is probably after him he is less than thrilled to have to take the remaining two girls Mary and Helen on with him. Mary meets a prospector and decides to stay with him. Then Clay flags down a stagecoach and puts Mary on it, just in time to have a showdown with Ludnov and crew. 6/10
 

Let's not forget the performance of Claude Jarman, Jr.

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10 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Once You Kiss a Stranger (1969) - Terrible reworking of Patricia Highsmith's Strangers On a Train, from Warner Brothers and director Robert Sparr. Psychotic rich girl Diana (Carol Lynley) makes a pact (or at least thinks she does) with pro golfer Jerry (Paul Burke) to kill the annoyance in the other person's life. Also featuring Martha Hyer, Peter Lind Hayes, Philip Carey, Stephen McNally, Kathryn Givney, Elaine Devry, Ann Doran, and Whit Bissell.

Lynley's the best part about this, as she gives it her all. It's a shame the rest of the production is bland, dull, and overlong by a good 30 minutes. The era production design is a fun flashback, with 8-track players and a hidden video camera the size of a large hardback book.    (5/10)

Source: TCM

MPW-36269

Has there ever been a successful re-make of a Hitchcock film?

Maybe "The Thirty-Nine Steps" with Kenneth More" came close.

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5 minutes ago, rayban said:

Has there ever been a successful re-make of a Hitchcock film?

Maybe "The Thirty-Nine Steps" with Kenneth More" came close.

I can't really think of one, unless you want to be cheeky and include the '56 version of The Man Who Knew Too Much.

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"The Loves of Carmen" - King Vidor - 1948 -

"Spoiler Alert" -

Very gripping story of a love affair between two mismatched people - a gypsy woman, Carmen (Rita Hayworth), who refuses to be subservient to any man and a soldier (Glenn Ford) with a bright future who lets his love for Carmen destroy him.

It's unusual to see a love story in which the woman is essentially, to be kind, "loose", has no heart and is so much stronger than the man. 

Glenn Ford, who plays Don Jose, essentially has the "woman 's role" in that he lives for love and lets that love guide him.

The film doesn 't follow the formula of "Gilda" and "Affair In Trinidad" - two tempestuous "lovers" - and, so, is all the more surprising for NOT following the formula.

Rita Hayworth gives a sexually charged performance - perhaps surprising for a 1948 film.

Glenn Ford is persuasively led about by the nose, so to speak.

Perhaps the ending is a foregone conclusion -  the lovers are both killed at the same time - but it arrives with quite a sting - because "the love affair" seemed so real.

Yes, it is a love story that puts us through the wringer, because, in this one, the Devil is a woman and the Man is her slave.

King Vidor directs with true expertise.

The film is in gorgeous color, too.

(When Rita Hayworth is playing a woman who was/seems "loose", she is truly memorable.

And Glenn Ford as a "love object" cannot be beat.)hqdefault.jpg

 

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2 hours ago, rayban said:

Has there ever been a successful re-make of a Hitchcock film?

Maybe "The Thirty-Nine Steps" with Kenneth More" came close.

Wasnt this film AWFUL??? (Once You Kiss A Stranger) I recorded it a couple weeks ago. I'd heard how awful it was, but it has to be seen to be believed! It played out so quickly at the time was little chance to see it. How boring can a film be that takes place half of its running time at a GOLF TOURNAMENT?????? Lynley's career started off well, but went quickly down hill after a couple years and she wound up doing drek like this......

 

Funniest part is Lynley chasing Martha Hyer (in hideous 60s garb) around in a golf cart!

 

5 is being generous. I'd give it a 2!!!

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18 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

For Sigourney Weaver, I would also include Working Girl (1988), which is now quite the period-piece time capsule, with giant shoulder pads and mile-high hairdo's; and The Ice Storm (1997), which is a good ensemble film, with Weaver a stand-out.

Also Death and the MaidenGalaxy QuestHeartbreakers, and Tadpole

A friend had a college prof who had dated Sigourney Weaver back before she became a star. The guy said it was very strange to see someone you had dated naked on the big screen.

Some soap fans may have caught Sigourney Weaver in the last days of Somerset (not a very good show by that time) playing a psychic named Avis.

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6 hours ago, rayban said:

Has there ever been a successful re-make of a Hitchcock film?

Maybe "The Thirty-Nine Steps" with Kenneth More" came close.

Well, if you count Hitchcock remaking "The Man Who Knew Too Much", even despite Doris Day's singing.

A friend had a college prof who had dated Sigourney Weaver back before she became a star. The guy said it was very strange to see someone you had dated naked on the big screen.

And to think that everyone still whines about her stripping down to that tank top in "Alien".  ;)

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On 10/18/2018 at 7:27 PM, misswonderly3 said:

So, surprised you didn't at least mention The Birds. I mean, I thought you were going to, it seems obvious. But, judging how rubbish this thing apparently is, guess you thought it would be an insult to Hitch.

Or Kaw, which also has Rod Taylor.  Poor guy.

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"Nurse on Wheels" - Gerald Thomas - 1963 -

This one is an entirely enjoyable comedy about a mobile nurse in a countryside community with an absolutely charming performance from a very young Juliet Mills.

It has a wonderfully eccentric cast - any one of whom could be turned into a film of his or her own.

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Esma Cannon as the nurse's addled mom is a comic sensation.

MV5BZTU1MTc1NzItYzNjZi00ZjEzLWFkNDktOTEx

 

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THE WOMEN HE'S UNDRESSED 2015

A documentary about Hollywood's great costume designer Orry-Kelly.

This Australian production is simply a mess, starting from the title: he DRESSED women, not undressed them, sheesh.

I love golden age Hollywood costume design and there just isn't enough written & illustrated about it. I was hoping to learn about O-K like why did he choose this field? His method of designing/creating the wonderful costumes? And just HOW he got a few of his more daring creations past the censors? The absolutely only new thing I had learned after watching this 95 minute jumble was that Orry-Kelly came from Australia. 

Nothing cheapens a documentary more than reenactments, having an actor portray the subject. This one inexplicably wastes valuable screen time with several scenes of an actor in a sailor suit rowing a boat. I'm guessing this was a failed attempt at unnecessary symbolism.

There are several celebrity interviews, but mostly the star just says, "I loved the costumes he designed for me in this role". How does that help round a picture of the artist? I know several stars liked their "home studio" designer so much they often engaged him/her to design their wedding gown-none of that interesting info included here.

O-K was very daring in many of his designs, most notably MM's illusion dresses in SOME LIKE IT HOT. The technique of beading over thin mesh (that photographs invisible) influenced next generation genius Bob Mackie, a perfect missed opportunity "interview". In fact, the entire film is a missed opportunity, since there is very little about O-K Oscar winning costume designing & creations in this film. A huge disappointment and complete waste of time.

 

 

 

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13 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

This one inexplicably wastes valuable screen time with several scenes of an actor in a sailor suit rowing a boat.

Did he catch his morning train?  Or have a cup of coffee?

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I've seen 'Blast of Silence' on the big screen and its a shocker. Leaves a lasting impact. There's some weak and threadbare aspects of the story in Act II (a tough hitman losing his edge because of a random encounter with his high school sweetheart?) but somehow the film pushes past this stumbling block. It wasnt written or acted well; just that one scene. It's important because its the tipping-point of the movie; but...groan.

But once the tale gets past this part, the rest of the groundwork laid in Act I takes over and the denouement' in Act III is properly grim and icy. Whew. It's got that queasy-feeling-in-the-pit-of-your-stomach which is the hallmark of really good noir.

One of the all-time great final shots to end a film. If you know the New York cityscape at all, you will relish it. The protagonist in this flick dies as hard as I've ever seen any male lead die, in any flick ever. It is rough viewing.

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"Are These Our Children?" - Wesley Ruggles - 1931 -

This drama concerns a nice young man (Eric Linden), who is, unfortunately, "corruptible" .

He falls in with a bad crowd and turns to sex and booze.

Never having enough money, he is always eager for more.

One night, very drunk and with the wild crowd, he accidentally kills a beloved family friend, who runs a delicatessen and won't sell him any liquor.

Once he is arrested for the crime, he grows very, very cocky and sees himself as an undeniable celebrity.

He becomes his own lawyer, but this tactic backfires.

He is proven guilty of the murder and is sentenced to death.

This pre-code drama with a message, of course, takes you on a dark path and, somehow, gets more and more dubious about its' young protagonist's future.

We do hope for the best, but, unfortunately, get the worst.

The film has a superb - and uncompromising - performance from Eric Linden, who shows us a very complicated and conflicted young man who choose to act without heart or conscience. 

Are-These-Our-Children-1931-1.jpg

(Hot babes are just the beginning.)

are_these_our_children_001.jpg

 

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On ‎10‎/‎19‎/‎2018 at 1:35 AM, LawrenceA said:

Once You Kiss a Stranger (1969) - Terrible reworking of Patricia Highsmith's Strangers On a Train, from Warner Brothers and director Robert Sparr. Psychotic rich girl Diana (Carol Lynley) makes a pact (or at least thinks she does) with pro golfer Jerry (Paul Burke) to kill the annoyance in the other person's life. Also featuring Martha Hyer, Peter Lind Hayes, Philip Carey, Stephen McNally, Kathryn Givney, Elaine Devry, Ann Doran, and Whit Bissell.

Lynley's the best part about this, as she gives it her all. It's a shame the rest of the production is bland, dull, and overlong by a good 30 minutes. The era production design is a fun flashback, with 8-track players and a hidden video camera the size of a large hardback book.    (5/10)

Source: TCM

MPW-36269

they ran that on the golf channel.

:lol:

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24 Hours (1931) 9/10

Big City, Small World

Where else but the precodes could a husband and wife reconcile over a murder rap?

The film starts out showing a big city as the camera pans over the skyscrapers during a snowy night as the clock strikes 11PM. Unhappily married Jim Towner (Clive Brook) and Fanny Towner (Kay Francis) are leaving a small quiet party held by one of their society swells. They talk of why they are so unhappy and...explain nothing. It seems like gibberish. But whatever the reason, Fanny is carrying on with a fellow rich person who looks rather sickly and sits under a blanket. He is hardly sexy. Fanny decides to break it off and try to work it out with Jim. I don't think she is sacrificing that much.

Meanwhile Jim leaves the apartment house, talks a bit to the doorman, heads over on foot to a speakeasy to have a drink, and then over to "Rosie's" named after his girlfriend, Rosie Duggan (Miriam Hopkins). He has some more drinks. Rosie takes him back to her place and puts him to bed on the couch. The next morning Jim awakens and finds Rosie lying across her bed, obviously murdered. He realizes that everyone will think he murdered her - obviously. He tries to sneak out, but he is seen, recognized, and arrested for Rosie's murder.

Why is this a small world? Well, the doorman Jim was talking to was Rosie's brother. He saw Jim leave Rosie's building when he came over to tell her about his new baby. The speakeasy Jim stopped at? There had just been a gangland killing before Jim got there and the killer was Rosie's estranged husband, brilliantly played by Regis Toomey who is at his whiny sniveling best. He is apparently some kind of small town hood, and the murder now has the big time hoods on his case.

The great little touches in this film? A hungry woman digs through some trash cans as Jim trudges in the snow during the blizzard towards the speakeasy - after all this is the Great Depression. He almost does nothing, but even through the fog of alcohol that he is in, he gives the woman some money, remembering "noblesse oblige" just a little. Miriam Hopkins is a revelation as Rosie, a torch singer who sexily belts out a song trying to make portly 50ish men feel sexy as she runs her fingers through her own wild hair. Finally there is Lucille La Verne as Toomey's character's landlady. Note to Toomey's character- maybe if you desperately need help from someone you shouldn't call that person an old hag. She has a small part - smaller than Toomey's, but she makes quite an impression.

This is 66 minutes of precode heaven. I highly recommend it.

source: youtube

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Dead Sleep (1990) - Suspense-deficient Australian thriller, from Village Roadshow and director Alec Mills. American nurse Maggie Healey (Linda Blair) gets a job at a private Australian psychiatric clinic, where noted doctor Jonthan Heckett (Tony Bonner) has pioneered a deep-sleep therapy that seems to show some success at treating mental illness. It isn't long before Maggie begins to suspect something's up, with both the treatment, which seems to be killing a lot of patients, and the good doctor, who drinks on the job and sleeps with the patients. Also featuring Andrew Booth, Christine Amor, Sueyan Cox, Brian Moll, Vassy Cotsopoulos, Peta Downes, and Craig Cronin.

This low-rent medical thriller never really gets moving, and it's a dull snooze-fest for most of its 86 minute runtime. There's a bit of gratuitous nudity, but very little violence, and the finale is an anticlimactic dud.   (4/10)

Source: TCM Underground. I'd have to rank this among the most dubious movie choices TCM has ever made, but hey, at least it was something I hadn't seen. That's worth something...isn't it?

AfZhe0jH2RxFUayO9FxC85bCnZA.jpg

 

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7 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

but hey, at least it was something I hadn't seen. That's worth something...isn't it?

As a classic movie fan for over 40 years, it feels like there's nothing "new" left to discover. And I don't watch movies at nearly the rate you do.

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20 hours ago, rayban said:

"Are These Are Children?" - Wesley Ruggles - 1931 -

This drama concerns a nice young man (Eric Linden), who is, unfortunately, "corruptible" .

He falls in with a bad crowd and turns to sex and booze.

 

 

;)

I thought it was OUR Children.  :blink:

Get outa FACEBOOK mode, chum.  ;)

Yeah, I stuck around for it after TWO SECONDS with Edward G. Robinson and Preston Foster.  I first saw this one either back in the vey early '80's or very late '70's.  I know it wasn't TCM, but too, it reminded me of how skewered our memories can get.  Like, I seemed to remember Foster falling to his death earlier on in the movie. and too, I was then and am STILL impressed by Robinson's outstanding performance in this film.  Much of it seemed more intended for the stage than a movie studio.  

Enjoyed both those movies immensely.

Sepiatone

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21 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

;)

I thought it was OUR Children.  :blink:

Get outa FACEBOOK mode, chum.  ;)

Yeah, I stuck around for it after TWO SECONDS with Edward G. Robinson and Preston Foster.  I first saw this one either back in the vey early '80's or very late '70's.  I know it wasn't TCM, but too, it reminded me of how skewered our memories can get.  Like, I seemed to remember Foster falling to his death earlier on in the movie. and too, I was then and am STILL impressed by Robinson's outstanding performance in this film.  Much of it seemed more intended for the stage than a movie studio.  

Enjoyed both those movies immensely.

Sepiatone

Thanks, I corrected the title.

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"Sweet Bird of Youth" - Richard Brooks - 1963 -

Richard Brooks, the writer/director has turned Tennessee Williams' fascinating, but unwieldy mess of a play into a gripping melodrama for the screen -

at its' heart, are two interesting monsters in a dead heat for survival - an aging movie star and an aging giggolo -

Paul Newman and Geraldine Page are superb -

that the lady will survive and the man may not isn't exactly a foregone conclusion -

but, surprisingly, in Richard Brooks' adaptation, both of these conflicted people do survive -

the two stars are surrounded by an excellent ensemble cast, especially Ed Begley and Madeleine Sherwood -

somehow, the power of this movie never seems to diminish -

perhaps because two tigers are in a death grip -

and that death grip is extremely compelling -

sweetbirdundertextlargest.jpg

 

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I caught the last hour of PATTERNS last night. They were featuring Ed Begly Sr. I had not heard of this film but enjoyed what I saw. Anyone who has ever worked for a large corporation should be able to relate. I learned at the end that Rod Serling wrote the screen play and the movie was adapted from a TV movie. Hopefully, I can find it again so I can watch it in it's entirety. 

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A_Small_Town_Idol_(1921)_-_15.jpg

A Small Town Idol - condensed version of the 1921 Mack Sennett film. Ben Turpin is a small town man who is falsely accused of bigamy by a romantic rival so he leaves to Hollywood. He comes back as a star but the villain is still there and won't let him have a break. This one had some funny gags and looked well shot. Unfortunately the full length version does not appear to be online or available anywhere. I hope it turns up some time though.

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