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13 hours ago, shutoo said:

 Here's the link to judge for yourself:  http://rarefilmm.com/2018/10/ask-any-girl-1959/

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Thanks for that shutoo. I own that half sheet poster since I love Shirley & Niven, but have never seen the film. 

Do you watch rarefilmm.com through your TV or computer? If you watch through TV, do you only get the small frame version? Can you see it full frame by downloading the file? 

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31 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

I'm still trying to fathom any sensible reason why Joe feels the need to, when mentioning who's in the cast of a movie he "just watched", also post a great deal of their entire filmography...?  ;)

And LORNA?-----

If you were a kid in 1988, then you're STILL a kid to me!

1. I like Joe's style! (and the past credits of the players are interesting.)

2. I am feeling particularly old this morning, so thank you especially.

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On 10/21/2018 at 6:34 PM, kingrat said:

On a different note, I saw the last half hour of Carry On Screaming and laughed myself silly. A guy can't always be in the mood for Eric Rohmer movies, you know? I hope TCM will be able to show more of the Carry On movies. And more Rohmer, too.

I'm very bummed CARRY ON SCREAMING has not been made available on TCM OnDemand.

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14 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

I'm still trying to fathom any sensible reason why Joe feels the need to, when mentioning who's in the cast of a movie he "just watched", also post a great deal of their entire filmography...?  ;)

 

OK I'm assuming I'm talking to fellow Aficionoirdos. I'm listing mostly what other Noirs the actors appeared in to show how they provide a connecting "cinematic memory" to other noirs. Same with director and cinematographers.

Sort of how like Westerns all used they same stock of character actors. If they were not in other noir I'll give a significant film something a lot of us would recognize.

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I just watched THE CURSE OF FRANKENSTEIN again. It was as good as I remembered. Hammer films did a great job of resurrecting Mary Shelly's Classic. While it didn't follow the book completely, it was a good representation. I'm sure there was some nostalgia involved for me. I am a real Hammer fan in that these films were popular during my teen and pre-teen years. Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee were both great horror stars from my youth. If they are in a film; I will watch. Just like Sean Connery will always be James Bond for me, Lee and Cushing will always be Dracula and Von Helsing. 

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"The Curse of the Mummy's Tomb" - Michael Carreras - 1964 -

"Spoiler Alert" -

This one is the second of the Mummy franchise from Hammer Films -

it starts off in a fairly conventional mode with the Mummy on a revenge campaign for the desecration of the sacred tomb -

then, quite surprisingly, it takes a wild turn that was perhaps inspired by the eternal lives of the vampires -

and, quite surprisingly, the star, Terence Morgan, is the vehicle of choice -

if I say anymore, I will spoil the enjoyment of the film -

Hammer Films gave a class production to the material -

although, as we have often heard, the money wasn't exactly flowing out of the coffers -

anyway, excellent direction, atmospheric production and first-rate cast -

including the stars - Terence Morgan, Ronald Howard and Fred Clark -

the-curse-of-the-mummys-tomb-36.jpg

the-curse-of-the-mummys-tomb_2-e15187829

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I just saw The Story on Page One (1959). Great title for a newspaper drama, which this is not. The opening credits feature Elmer Bernstein's music and some noirish photographer from the great James Wong Howe, suggesting this will be a film noir, but it is not. It doesn't have the look or the feel of noir, although it is about a murder trial. Apart from a brief scene late in the movie, Howe doesn't have the opportunity for much in the way of interesting visuals.

Instead, The Story on Page One is a well-acted courtroom drama. Clifford Odets both wrote and directed. Odets' direction is straightforward, but without much visual sense. Although Odets' writing for other films is sometimes mannered (the stylization in Deadline at Dawn works for me, though the dialogue in the adaptations of Odets' plays often doesn't), that is not the case here. I would never have guessed Odets as the author. One big plus is that the lengthy courtroom scenes are much closer than usual to permissible courtroom testimony, and the judge's rulings are what one would expect to hear in an actual trial.

About those performances: I sometimes forget that Anthony Franciosa is on occasion (A Hatful of Rain, Career) a very good actor. He's playing a character who's like a sketch for the Paul Newman character in The Verdict, although his personal story is dropped after his first few scenes. Franciosa is committed and intense in all the right ways, and he commands our attention whenever he's on screen. Rita Hayworth has surprisingly aged in the decade or so since The Lady from Shanghai. She's playing a slightly frumpy, though attractive, housewife, quiet, modest, decent, and she's always believable. Gig Young plays her lover. For a good-looking man, Young played a number of weak and/or somewhat sleazy roles. He's a weakling here, trying to escape from under the thumb of his domineering mother (Mildred Dunnock) who has a Suthun accent out of Tennessee Williams. In fact, it's interesting and odd to see a Jewish New Yorker like Odets imitating the Southern Gothic school for Dunnock's scenes. To me, Dunnock, for all her talent, is only a skillful actress playing a cliched overbearing Mom, a type so familiar from 1950s drama.

Although Dunnock has a big dramatic courtroom scene where she's cross-examined by Franciosa, Katherine Squire probably has more screen time as Rita Hayworth's mother, who has actually encouraged her daughter to turn to another man as an escape from an abusive husband. Squire, whom some may remember from The Doctors and Search for Tomorrow in the 1970s, always seems quirky and real, and her performance holds up better than Dunnock's. Other notables in the strong supporting cast include the famous acting teacher Sanford Meisner as the smarmy and supercilious, but smart and deadly, attorney who cross-examines Gig Young mercilessly; Hugh Griffith as the wise and fair judge; Jay Adler as an insurance salesman; and William Challee, terrific as a salacious hotel clerk.

Hayworth has been a great choice for Star of the Month, and I now have a much better sense of her career and more respect for her work. I do wish that They Came to Cordura could have been included.

 

 

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I can't say exactly when I first saw THE STORY ON PAGE ONE.  I was(at the time) only familiar with Franciosa from his mid '60's TV show VALENTINE'S DAY, a favorite show of mine then, so I was already (and still am) a sort of Franciosa fan.  ;)

I too, seem(for some reason) to recall the movie(first seen on TV) out of sequence....  For instance, seems I recall seeing the "murder" before  seeing Squire going to see Franciosa at his disheveled office.  No matter.

I always thought it was a fairly good courtroom drama.  And too, over the years, never did think in terms of seeing James Wong Howe's name in the opening credits  suggests "this will be a film noir."  That seems to diminish Howe's formidable range as a cinematographer.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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I watched Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid last evening, my first viewing of the film in a few years though I remembered it quite well.

I was pleased at how well it holds up, with its intelligent, at times light heartedly humourous, screenplay loosely based upon fact and the jaunty musical accompaniment by Burt Bacharach. Above everything else, though, what really holds it together, it seems to me, is the remarkable chemistry between two of the great superstars of that era, Newman and Redford. Newman was at the peak of his popularity when this film was made, and it would be the role of the laconic, fast shooting Sundance Kid that would put Redford on the road to enjoy the same kind of stardom.

Many have decried Bacharach's '60s sounding "Raindrops Keeping Falling On My Head" as being included in a film about the American West of the late 1890s but I don't mind it at all in the context of the one scene in the film in which it appears. Newman is having a jolly time riding on that bike, with Katharine Ross often laughing at his antics in this light moment in the film. I also noticed that Newman did most of the riding, too, only being obviously doubled once, in the scene in which he breaks through a corral fence, enraging a bull.

I never found Paul Newman more engaging as an actor than as the talkative, likeable Butch Cassidy, and Redford seems perfect casting as Sundance. I hate to think what would have happened to this film if Jack Lemmon had played the Sundance Kid instead, which might have happened if Jack had not turned down the role. Of course, McQueen turned the part down, too, apparently after some friction with Newman.

Surprisingly the film got mixed reviews when first released, though it would go on to be the biggest money maker of 1969 and get a few Oscar nominations, including one for best picture. I went to the show that year and saw a number of the more celebrated films of 1969, including Midnight Cowboy, True Grit, Alice's Restaurant and The Wild Bunch. Butch was my favourite film of the year (it still is) though I wasn't surprised when it lost the best picture award to the far more grim modern street drama, Midnight Cowboy.

SPOILER ALERT: The ending is interesting. After Butch and Sundance take refuge in an adobe hut after being shot up by Bolivian troops, we know they are going to die. What's more, they must know it, too. Yet the screenplay has these two, badly wounded as both are, still mildly scolding one another and even discussing what they are going to do when they "get out of there," go to Australia.

It's a form of denial on both their parts, this talk of Australia, since they are completely surrounded by federal troops and not even a mouse could escape from that siege situation alive. But the denial of reality bantering helps to bolster their courage as they are about to burst out of the hut with guns blazing.

Interestingly the filmmakers decided to not repeat the bloody slow motion deaths of Bonnie and Clyde done two years before. Instead the last view we have of Butch and Sundance is a freeze frame of them with guns firing in true legendary outlaw fashion. The film's soundtrack, with what seems like a few hundred rounds of guns firing simultaneously, leaves no doubt as to what happens to our two heroes within seconds of that freeze frame occurring.

I'm glad the movie gave us that freeze frame as our final image of the two, and the image by which we will remember them. In fact, that same image is the one that was used in much of the advertising material for the film.

220px-Butch_sundance_poster.jpg

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12 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I watched Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid last evening, my first viewing of the film in a few years though I remembered it quite well.

I was pleased at how well it holds up, with its intelligent, at times light heartedly humourous, screenplay loosely based upon fact and the jaunty musical accompaniment by Burt Bacharach. Above everything else, though, what really holds it together, it seems to me, is the remarkable chemistry between two of the great superstars of that era, Newman and Redford. Newman was at the peak of his popularity when this film was made, and it would be the role of the laconic, fast shooting Sundance Kid that would put Redford on the road to enjoy the same kind of stardom.

Many have decried Bacharach's '60s sounding "Raindrops Keeping Falling On My Head" as being included in a film about the American West of the late 1890s but I don't mind it at all in the context of the one scene in the film in which it appears. Newman is having a jolly time riding on that bike, with Katharine Ross often laughing at his antics in this light moment in the film. I also noticed that Newman did moist of the riding, too, only being obviously doubled once, in the scene in which he breaks through a corral fence, enraging a bull.

I never found Paul Newman more engaging as an actor than as the talkative, likeable Butch Cassidy, and Redford seems perfect casting as Sundance. I hate to think what would have happened to this film if Jack Lemmon had played the Sundance Kid instead, which might have happened if Jack had not turned down the role. Of course, McQueen turned the part down, too, apparently after some friction with Newman.

Surprisingly the film got mixed reviews when first released, though it would go on to be the biggest money maker of 1969 and get a few Oscar nominations, including one for best picture. I went to the show that year and saw a number of the more celebrated films of 1969, including Midnight Cowboy, True Grit, Alice's Restaurant and The Wild Bunch. Butch was my favourite film of the year (it still is) though I wasn't surprised when it lost the best picture award to the far more grim modern street drama, Midnight Cowboy.

SPOILER ALERT: The ending is interesting. After Butch and Sundance take refuge in an adobe hut after being shot up by Bolivian troops, we know they are going to die. What's more, they must know it, too. Yet the screenplay has these two, badly wounded as both are, still mildly scolding one another and even discussing what they are going to do when they "get out of there," go to Australia.

It's a form of denial on both their parts, this talk of Australia, since they are completely surrounded by federal troops and not even a mouse could escape from that siege situation alive. But the denial of reality bantering helps to bolster their courage as they are about to burst out of the hut with guns blazing.

Interestingly the filmmakers decided to not repeat the bloody slow motion deaths of Bonnie and Clyde done two years before. Instead the last view we have of Butch and Sundance is a freeze frame of them with guns firing in true legendary outlaw fashion. The film's soundtrack, with what seems like a few hundred rounds of guns firing simultaneously, leaves no doubt as to what happens to our two heroes within seconds of that freeze frame occurring.

I'm glad the movie gave us that freeze frame as our final image of the two, and the image by which we will remember them. In fact, that same image is the one that was used in much of the advertising material for the film.

220px-Butch_sundance_poster.jpg

This my second favorite movie of all time (Casablanca is #1). I watch it almost every time it is broadcast and have the DVD. It's hard to believe it turns 50 next year. I've learned from doing research that the film is very accurate regarding their lives and times. There are stories out there that Butch and Sundance might have actually survived and returned to the US. Some historians believe that while that final scene isn't a true representation of  what actually happened, they did both die in South America. The romantic in me wants to believe they both did escape and lived out their lives under assumed identities. "I've got vision; and the rest of the world wears bifocals".

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1 hour ago, Hoganman1 said:

This my second favorite movie of all time (Casablanca is #1). I watch it almost every time it is broadcast and have the DVD. It's hard to believe it turns 50 next year. I've learned from doing research that the film is very accurate regarding their lives and times. There are stories out there that Butch and Sundance might have actually survived and returned to the US. Some historians believe that while that final scene isn't a true representation of  what actually happened, they did both die in South America. The romantic in me wants to believe they both did escape and lived out their lives under assumed identities. "I've got vision; and the rest of the world wears bifocals".

Newman's been gone for a decade and Redford's latest release, The Old Man And The Gun, is being announced as his last before retirement. But at almost the half century mark Butch Cassidy still has a contemporary feel to it. I don't think the film has dated at all. The performances of the two leads has a lot to do with that.

One of the film's most famous scenes in which Redford says he doesn't want to jump into a river to escape the law because he can't swim. Newman's rejoinder, laughter, followed by the statement, "Are you crazy? The fall will probably kill you" got the biggest laugh from the audience that night I saw the film at the theatre in 1969.

maxresdefault.jpg

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

I watched Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid last evening, my first viewing of the film in a few years though I remembered it quite well.

I was pleased at how well it holds up, with its intelligent, at times light heartedly humourous, screenplay loosely based upon fact and the jaunty musical accompaniment by Burt Bacharach. Above everything else, though, what really holds it together, it seems to me, is the remarkable chemistry between two of the great superstars of that era, Newman and Redford. Newman was at the peak of his popularity when this film was made, and it would be the role of the laconic, fast shooting Sundance Kid that would put Redford on the road to enjoy the same kind of stardom.

Many have decried Bacharach's '60s sounding "Raindrops Keeping Falling On My Head" as being included in a film about the American West of the late 1890s but I don't mind it at all in the context of the one scene in the film in which it appears. Newman is having a jolly time riding on that bike, with Katharine Ross often laughing at his antics in this light moment in the film. I also noticed that Newman did most of the riding, too, only being obviously doubled once, in the scene in which he breaks through a corral fence, enraging a bull.

I never found Paul Newman more engaging as an actor than as the talkative, likeable Butch Cassidy, and Redford seems perfect casting as Sundance. I hate to think what would have happened to this film if Jack Lemmon had played the Sundance Kid instead, which might have happened if Jack had not turned down the role. Of course, McQueen turned the part down, too, apparently after some friction with Newman.

Surprisingly the film got mixed reviews when first released, though it would go on to be the biggest money maker of 1969 and get a few Oscar nominations, including one for best picture. I went to the show that year and saw a number of the more celebrated films of 1969, including Midnight Cowboy, True Grit, Alice's Restaurant and The Wild Bunch. Butch was my favourite film of the year (it still is) though I wasn't surprised when it lost the best picture award to the far more grim modern street drama, Midnight Cowboy.

SPOILER ALERT: The ending is interesting. After Butch and Sundance take refuge in an adobe hut after being shot up by Bolivian troops, we know they are going to die. What's more, they must know it, too. Yet the screenplay has these two, badly wounded as both are, still mildly scolding one another and even discussing what they are going to do when they "get out of there," go to Australia.

It's a form of denial on both their parts, this talk of Australia, since they are completely surrounded by federal troops and not even a mouse could escape from that siege situation alive. But the denial of reality bantering helps to bolster their courage as they are about to burst out of the hut with guns blazing.

Interestingly the filmmakers decided to not repeat the bloody slow motion deaths of Bonnie and Clyde done two years before. Instead the last view we have of Butch and Sundance is a freeze frame of them with guns firing in true legendary outlaw fashion. The film's soundtrack, with what seems like a few hundred rounds of guns firing simultaneously, leaves no doubt as to what happens to our two heroes within seconds of that freeze frame occurring.

I'm glad the movie gave us that freeze frame as our final image of the two, and the image by which we will remember them. In fact, that same image is the one that was used in much of the advertising material for the film.

220px-Butch_sundance_poster.jpg

What was the sequel like?

 

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9 hours ago, kingrat said:

I just saw The Story on Page One (1959). Great title for a newspaper drama, which this is not. The opening credits feature Elmer Bernstein's music and some noirish photographer from the great James Wong Howe, suggesting this will be a film noir, but it is not. It doesn't have the look or the feel of noir, although it is about a murder trial. Apart from a brief scene late in the movie, Howe doesn't have the opportunity for much in the way of interesting visuals.

Instead, The Story on Page One is a well-acted courtroom drama. Clifford Odets both wrote and directed. Odets' direction is straightforward, but without much visual sense. Although Odets' writing for other films is sometimes mannered (the stylization in Deadline at Dawn works for me, though the dialogue in the adaptations of Odets' plays often doesn't), that is not the case here. I would never have guessed Odets as the author. One big plus is that the lengthy courtroom scenes are much closer than usual to permissible courtroom testimony, and the judge's rulings are what one would expect to hear in an actual trial.

About those performances: I sometimes forget that Anthony Franciosa is on occasion (A Hatful of Rain, Career) a very good actor. He's playing a character who's like a sketch for the Paul Newman character in The Verdict, although his personal story is dropped after his first few scenes. Franciosa is committed and intense in all the right ways, and he commands our attention whenever he's on screen. Rita Hayworth has surprisingly aged in the decade or so since The Lady from Shanghai. She's playing a slightly frumpy, though attractive, housewife, quiet, modest, decent, and she's always believable. Gig Young plays her lover. For a good-looking man, Young played a number of weak and/or somewhat sleazy roles. He's a weakling here, trying to escape from under the thumb of his domineering mother (Mildred Dunnock) who has a Suthun accent out of Tennessee Williams. In fact, it's interesting and odd to see a Jewish New Yorker like Odets imitating the Southern Gothic school for Dunnock's scenes. To me, Dunnock, for all her talent, is only a skillful actress playing a cliched overbearing Mom, a type so familiar from 1950s drama.

Although Dunnock has a big dramatic courtroom scene where she's cross-examined by Franciosa, Katherine Squire probably has more screen time as Rita Hayworth's mother, who has actually encouraged her daughter to turn to another man as an escape from an abusive husband. Squire, whom some may remember from The Doctors and Search for Tomorrow in the 1970s, always seems quirky and real, and her performance holds up better than Dunnock's. Other notables in the strong supporting cast include the famous acting teacher Sanford Meisner as the smarmy and supercilious, but smart and deadly, attorney who cross-examines Gig Young mercilessly; Hugh Griffith as the wise and fair judge; Jay Adler as an insurance salesman; and William ritsaChallee, terrific as a salacious hotel clerk.

Hayworth has been a great choice for Star of the Month, and I now have a much better sense of her career and more respect for her work. I do wish that They Came to Cordura could have been included.

 

 

 

Rita Hayworth has such great charisma - and she was a fine actress, too - and she could dance with the best of them (Fred Astaire).

I am startled by her bold performance in "The Loves of Carmen" - it sees too, too real.

But, in "Miss Sadie Thompson", she seemed to outdo even herself.

It's one of the screen's great performances.

I think that her beauty and her sexual allure blinded a lot of people to the genuine actress that she was - and will always be.

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7 minutes ago, TomJH said:

i don't know of any sequel. It would be rather difficult to have one, considering the film's ending.

You are right, it was "Butch and Sundance: The Early Years", a 1979 film with William Katt.

I've never seen it. 

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3 minutes ago, rayban said:

Rita Hayworth has such great charisma - and she was a fine actress, too - and she could dance with the best of them (Fred Astaire).

I am startled by her bold performance in "The Loves of Carmen" - it sees too, too real.

But, in "Miss Sadie Thompson", she seemed to outdo even herself.

It's one of the screen's great performances.

I think that her beauty and her sexual allure blinded a lot of people to the genuine actress that she was - and will always be.

I think Hayworth lost something after her return to the movies following her marriage to Ali Khan. While I agree that she is good in Miss Sadie Thompson she always seems to come most alive in her later films in any musical scenes she may have. Her early return films like An Affair in Trinidad and Salome both have her seeming to go just through the paces in any acting scenes.

There would later be some acting credibility on occasion when she was in a film like They Came to Cordura. But that divine spark and sensual allure that was hers at the time of Gilda seemed extinguished forever after her break from the movies in 1948, I feel. As Hayworth aged there seemed to be a tired sadness about her.

The most vibrant and confident that I ever saw Hayworth as an actress was when she played Gilda.

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16 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I think Hayworth lost something after her return to the movies following her marriage to Ali Khan. While I agree that she is good in Miss Sadie Thompson she always seems to come most alive in her later films in any musical scenes she may have. Her early return films like An Affair in Trinidad and Salome both have her seeming to go just through the paces in any acting scenes.

There would later be some acting credibility on occasion when she was in a film like They Came to Cordura. But that divine spark and sensual allure that was hers at the time of Gilda seemed extinguished forever after her break from the movies in 1948, I feel. As Hayworth aged there seemed to be a tired sadness about her.

The most vibrant and confident that I ever saw Hayworth as an actress was when she played Gilda.

Yes, her early career in the 40's was memorable.

Her youth, beauty, allure and talent were captured - perfectly.

She was "a sex goddess".

She should have never made "Salome" - she was much too old.

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10 hours ago, kingrat said:

I just saw The Story on Page One (1959). .... Rita Hayworth has surprisingly aged in the decade or so since The Lady from Shanghai. She's playing a slightly frumpy, though attractive, housewife, quiet, modest, decent, and she's always believable.

You talk about how much Rita Hayworth aged between 1949-1959. I've been reading some stuff written by Rita's daughter, who took care of her at the end of her life. She was saying that Rita was showing signs of Alzheimer's as early as when she was in Separate Tables in 1958. She said it was not so much her performance, but this blank stare she would exhibit. Wow. To be not even 40 yet and in the early stages of Alzheimer's. Rita got a definite diagnosis in 1980, but then I never even heard of this disease before 1978. Prior to that someone would just be diagnosed as prematurely senile. Her daughter said it was "two decades of hell" up to the diagnosis. Just a very sad article. I just wonder if actually looking prematurely aged is part and parcel of Alzheimer's.

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On 10/23/2018 at 8:08 AM, TikiSoo said:

Do you watch rarefilmm.com through your TV or computer? If you watch through TV, do you only get the small frame version? Can you see it full frame by downloading the file? 

Actually I watched this one on laptop (well, Surface, which is what I use now..gorgeous screen), but I do watch films from here on tv...I just use the Silk browser on fire tv (or firestick), and put in the address.. like a big computer screen..just hit the box in the lower right corner to make it full screen..works like a charm.  

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12 hours ago, TomJH said:

I watched Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid last evening, my first viewing of the film in a few years though I remembered it quite well.

I was pleased at how well it holds up, with its intelligent, at times light heartedly humourous, screenplay loosely based upon fact and the jaunty musical accompaniment by Burt Bacharach. Above everything else, though, what really holds it together, it seems to me, is the remarkable chemistry between two of the great superstars of that era, Newman and Redford. Newman was at the peak of his popularity when this film was made, and it would be the role of the laconic, fast shooting Sundance Kid that would put Redford on the road to enjoy the same kind of stardom.

Many have decried Bacharach's '60s sounding "Raindrops Keeping Falling On My Head" as being included in a film about the American West of the late 1890s but I don't mind it at all in the context of the one scene in the film in which it appears. Newman is having a jolly time riding on that bike, with Katharine Ross often laughing at his antics in this light moment in the film. I also noticed that Newman did most of the riding, too, only being obviously doubled once, in the scene in which he breaks through a corral fence, enraging a bull.

I never found Paul Newman more engaging as an actor than as the talkative, likeable Butch Cassidy, and Redford seems perfect casting as Sundance. I hate to think what would have happened to this film if Jack Lemmon had played the Sundance Kid instead, which might have happened if Jack had not turned down the role. Of course, McQueen turned the part down, too, apparently after some friction with Newman.

Surprisingly the film got mixed reviews when first released, though it would go on to be the biggest money maker of 1969 and get a few Oscar nominations, including one for best picture. I went to the show that year and saw a number of the more celebrated films of 1969, including Midnight Cowboy, True Grit, Alice's Restaurant and The Wild Bunch. Butch was my favourite film of the year (it still is) though I wasn't surprised when it lost the best picture award to the far more grim modern street drama, Midnight Cowboy.

SPOILER ALERT: The ending is interesting. After Butch and Sundance take refuge in an adobe hut after being shot up by Bolivian troops, we know they are going to die. What's more, they must know it, too. Yet the screenplay has these two, badly wounded as both are, still mildly scolding one another and even discussing what they are going to do when they "get out of there," go to Australia.

It's a form of denial on both their parts, this talk of Australia, since they are completely surrounded by federal troops and not even a mouse could escape from that siege situation alive. But the denial of reality bantering helps to bolster their courage as they are about to burst out of the hut with guns blazing.

Interestingly the filmmakers decided to not repeat the bloody slow motion deaths of Bonnie and Clyde done two years before. Instead the last view we have of Butch and Sundance is a freeze frame of them with guns firing in true legendary outlaw fashion. The film's soundtrack, with what seems like a few hundred rounds of guns firing simultaneously, leaves no doubt as to what happens to our two heroes within seconds of that freeze frame occurring.

I'm glad the movie gave us that freeze frame as our final image of the two, and the image by which we will remember them. In fact, that same image is the one that was used in much of the advertising material for the film.

220px-Butch_sundance_poster.jpg

You may want to check out, if you haven't, Blackthorn (2011)

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23 hours ago, TomJH said:

I watched Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid last evening, my first viewing of the film in a few years though I remembered it quite well.

 

Many have decried Bacharach's '60s sounding "Raindrops Keeping Falling On My Head" as being included in a film about the American West of the late 1890s but I don't mind it at all in the context of the one scene in the film in which it appears. Newman is having a jolly time riding on that bike, with Katharine Ross often laughing at his antics in this light moment in the film. I also noticed that Newman did most of the riding, too, only being obviously doubled once, in the scene in which he breaks through a corral fence, enraging a bull.

 

I remember the same complaint too, despite the fact that many Hollywood Westerns used scores that were drenched with electric guitars using a "fuzz" tone.  Before AND after "Butch Cassidy".  

Sepiatone

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20 hours ago, shutoo said:

yes it is..available until the 27th

Dang, not on mine!

(We figured out a little while back that different cable systems in different parts of the country seem to offer a completely different list of titles Available on TCM ON DEMAND, Although no one here has exactly figured out why)

Thanks for the info though, although I have to admit it disappoints me even more so to know “carry on screaming” has been offered on various other systems not mine

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3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

I remember the same complaint too, despite the fact that many Hollywood Westerns used scores that were drenched with electric guitars using a "fuzz" tone.  Before AND after "Butch Cassidy".  

Sepiatone

It just feels too much "60's" relative to the other Westerns at that time. You notice it as something that is apart from the story line. Where as in the others it's not noticed (electric guitars using a "fuzz" tone) and seems to fit better.

Raindrops feel like a pop marketing tool. Out of place.

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

It just feels too much "60's" relative to the other Westerns at that time. You notice it as something that is apart from the story line. Where as in the others it's not noticed (electric guitars using a "fuzz" tone) and seems to fit better.

Raindrops feel like a pop marketing tool. Out of place.

It is like a music video appearing in the middle of a film.    As noted by Tom,  the scene and the music 'work' well together, so in that way it is "complete" (stands on its own),  but clearly it appears apart from the story line and overall film.

 

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