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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

It just feels too much "60's" relative to the other Westerns at that time. You notice it as something that is apart from the story line. Where as in the others it's not noticed (electric guitars using a "fuzz" tone) and seems to fit better.

Raindrops feel like a pop marketing tool. Out of place.

Well, if that's so, then why did I, and others I know NOTICE it?  B)

But I do agree with you on that "Raindrops" sequence.  Also, the music in that instrumental segment in the samwe sequence doesn't fit either.

Sepiatone

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8 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

It is like a music video appearing in the middle of a film.    As noted by Tom,  the scene and the music 'work' well together, so in that way it is "complete" (stands on its own),  but clearly it appears apart from the story line and overall film.

 

There are at least four or five of these "Music Video" Westerns. These are the kind of programming ideas that would be nice to explore. There's Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid, The Ballad Of Cable Hogue, Judge Roy Bean,  The Dutchess and the Dirt Water Fox and I think Harry Tracy: The Last of the Wild Bunch.

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5 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Well, if that's so, then why did I, and others I know NOTICE it?

Didn't notice it? What kind of Western did you watch as a kid.....  singing cowboy movies? (not that there is anything wrong with that). Those were the Westerns where all of a sudden a Western Swing Tune would pop up in otherwise supposedly period piece.

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Nah.  Now, you KNOW I must've been referring to some of those lower budget late '50's to mid/late '60's (when the "fuzz-tone" started appearing) Westerns.  "Spaghetti Westerns" are the main culprit in this.

Sepiatone

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8 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Nah.  Now, you KNOW I must've been referring to some of those lower budget late '50's to mid/late '60's (when the "fuzz-tone" started appearing) Westerns.  "Spaghetti Westerns" are the main culprit in this.

Sepiatone

But in the Spaghetti Westerns they didn't come off as a "Music Video" they blended together better rather than say, "oh, great here comes Raindrops I can go take a bathroom break and not miss the story," type sequence.

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33 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Didn't notice it? What kind of Western did you watch as a kid.....  singing cowboy movies? (not that there is anything wrong with that). Those were the Westerns where all of a sudden a Western Swing Tune would pop up in otherwise supposedly period piece.

Well at least in those singing cowboy westerns they used acoustic instruments.    (verses a musical scene where there are electric instruments and no outlet for miles!).

Also,  did you know that us jazz guitar players have a term called 'cowboy chords':   These are the open chords that those famous western movie actors like Gene Autry and Roy Rogers used (also called folk guitar chords).    One can't be a jazzer and use those stinking cowboy chords.

 

 

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5 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Well, if that's so, then why did I, and others I know NOTICE it?  B)

But I do agree with you on that "Raindrops" sequence.  Also, the music in that instrumental segment in the samwe sequence doesn't fit either.

Basically, you have to appreciate what William Goldman was doing--Westerns was one of the genres that was most up for the late-60's/early-70's "Deconstructionist" period, and Goldman was deconstructing by making a sort of Princess Bride Western:  Where the cowboys all act a little more 60's-contemporary and goofy/wisecracking than usual, and outlaw "legends" are reduced to lovably bumbling and roguish hip regular-guys.

That certainly accounts for most of Newman and Redford's dialogue, and also for the rainbow-and-flowers bop-a-da 60's Burt Bachrach score in the old West--If you couldn't be a hippie in 1905, being one of the last outlaws in an increasingly civilized West was the next best way to do your own thing.

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"The Corpse Vanishes" - Wallace Fox - 1942 -

It's an extremely low-buget "chiller" that is simpy too hurried - in its' production - to take full advantage of its' inventive storyline.

But what a horror-film beauty it could certainly have been.

Bela Lugosi, the star, is more or less reduced to "a presence" rather than "a performance".

The rest of the cast, who were obviously capable, seem to be "phoning it in".

   Bela-Lugosi-in-The-Corpse-Vanishes.jpg?f

MV5BNWViNmRjYTAtYmY1Yi00MmY1LWI0NDAtNjIx

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11 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

(We figured out a little while back that different cable systems in different parts of the country seem to offer a completely different list of titles Available on TCM ON DEMAND, Although no one here has exactly figured out why)

I didn't know that!  that's strange...why would tcm care how you get their channel? Oh well..I stopped trying to figure out their logic long ago...

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Night Monster (1942) - Minor horror mystery from Universal Pictures and director Ford Beebe. Several characters converge at the remote mansion home of crippled millionaire Kurt Ingston (Ralph Morgan), including doctors King (Lionel Atwill) and Harper (Irene Hervey) and writer Baldwin (Don Porter). Ingston hopes to impress everyone with the psychic power of his guest Agor Singh (Nils Asther), but the parlor tricks are sidelined when bodies start piling up, the work of a reputed monster stalking the fog-enshrouded grounds of the estate. Also featuring Bela Lugosi, Leif Erickson, Fay Helm, Doris Lloyd, Frank Reicher, Robert Homans, and Cyril Delevanti.

The atmosphere is appropriately spooky, particularly the outdoor scenes, and there are plenty of interesting actors in the cast. Unfortunately the two leads, played by Porter and Hervey, are rather dull. Erickson is amusing as a sex-crazed chauffeur, while Lugosi is wasted as the creepy butler. Not one of Universal's best, but far from their worst.   (6/10)

Source: TCM

4017ec76d45493c064caca3fb5781371.jpg

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9 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Night Monster (1942) - Minor horror mystery from Universal Pictures and director Ford Beebe. Several characters converge at the remote mansion home of crippled millionaire Kurt Ingston (Ralph Morgan), including doctors King (Lionel Atwill) and Harper (Irene Hervey) and writer Baldwin (Don Porter). Ingston hopes to impress everyone with the psychic power of his guest Agor Singh (Nils Asther), but the parlor tricks are sidelined when bodies start piling up, the work of a reputed monster stalking the fog-enshrouded grounds of the estate.

 

"UM, EXCUSE US, WE'RE TRYING TO FILM 'THE WOLF MAN' ON THIS PART OF THE SET, COULD YOU 'NIGHT MONSTER' PEOPLE PUHLEEEEZE KEEP IT DOWN? And tell Lugosi to get his *** in a puffy shirt, we're shooting the gypsy camp scene in an hour."

 

(I know the chronology doesn't line up, but I'd like to imagine this happened between the two crews at some point.)

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I watched this:

MV5BYWI0MGRiOTMtNGY3Mi00OTc5LWE4NzMtNDZl

on amazon prime.

it's a long (2 hours and 26 minutes!), incredibly thorough documentary on HAMMER STUDIOS, about 90% of it is about (duh) the horror pics, but someone decided SHE and some of the others needed to be highlighted for some reason...

i'd seen it (and numerous other HAMMER docs before, including a good one MARK GATNISS did for the BBC which is on youtube) before, but i was still pretty enthralled. it helps that PETER CUSHING (who is HILARIOUS and seems to have been a wonderful person in real life) and a less aloof than usual CHRISTOPHER LEE participated and shared narrator duties. Cushing died quite soon after this was made.

They also talk to FERDY MAYNE who shreds CHRIS LEE for badmouthing his performance in THE FEARLESS VAMPIRE KILLERS.

HAMMER DOCS to me are fascinating because everyone is SO BRITISH and SO BUSINESS LIKE in discussing these prurient, expoitation-laden movies. there's a certain "dictated by the bottom line" element to the stories- ie big decisions about the sets, plots, endings and casting of the films were DEMANDED above all by FINANCIAL RESTRAINTS and not artistic merit, something I deeply resent in American International pictures and the "ouevre" of CORMAN, but find oddly charming in HAMMER MOVIES.

some fascinating behind-the-scenes footage is included.

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4 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I watched this:

MV5BYWI0MGRiOTMtNGY3Mi00OTc5LWE4NzMtNDZl

on amazon prime.

it's a long (2 hours and 26 minutes!) incredibly thorough documentary on HAMMER STUDIOS, about 90% of it is about (duh) the horror pics, but someone decided SHE and some of the others needed to be highlighted for some reason...

i'd seen it (and numerous other HAMMER docs before, including a good one MARK GATNISS did for the BBC which is on youtube) before, but i was still pretty enthralled. it helps that PETER CUSHING (who is HILARIOUS and seems to have been a wonderful person in real life) and a less ****y than usual CHRISTOPHER LEE participated and shared narrator duties. Cushing died quite soon after this was made.

They also talk to FERDY MAYNE who shreds CHRIS LEE for badmouthing his performance in THE FEARLESS VAMPIRE KILLERS.

HAMMER DOCS to me are fascinating because everyone is SO BRITISH and SO BUSINESS LIKE in discussing these prurient, expoitation-laden movies. there's a certain "dictated by the bottom line" element to the stories- ie big decisions about the sets, plots, endings and casting of the films were DEMANDED above all by FINANCIAL RESTRAINTS and not artistic merit, something I deeply resent in American International pictures and the "ouevre" of CORMAN, but find oddly charming in HAMMER MOVIES.

I agree, the Hammer Horror films have a certain fascination.

The allure of "The Mummy" and "The Curse of the Mummy's Tomb", etc. never seems to fade.

One viewing is never enough.

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The Lady Vanishes (1938).  I just watched this Hitchcock film last night.  I had never seen it before.  I loved it.  The British films are interesting.  They have a different style than American films.  In this film, Margaret Lockwood (an actress I hadn't heard of until TCM's spotlight a couple weeks ago), plays a playgirl who is traveling by train from the made-up European country of Bandrika, nestled among the Alps (I am assuming) to London to meet her fiance.  Prior to leaving for the train, we meet the cast of characters in a crowded hotel.  It seems that there has been an avalanche--leaving everyone stranded overnight.  Lockwood has managed to score a room (and seems to have been in the hotel for awhile), as has Michael Redgrave, a musician who is planning on traveling to Yorkshire.  Dame Mae Whitty is introduced as a governess who has been living in Bandrika for six years and is planning on returning to England.  We also meet a man traveling with his mistress, and a pair of cricket enthusiasts trying to get to London to see the next cricket tournament.

Lockwood and Redgrave are presented to the audience as adversaries.  Redgrave's folk music (played on a clarinet with a backwards reed, no less) is irritating both Lockwood and Whitty.  Lockwood tries to use her influence to bribe the hotel manager into kicking Redgrave out of his room.  Redgrave retaliates by showing up to Lockwood's room and casually trying to move in with her until she relents and calls the hotel manager to let Redgrave back into his room. Like how most of these relationships tend to turn out in the movies, you know that they'll end up falling in love with one another by the end of the film.

The next morning, everyone at the hotel boards the train.  Prior to embarking on the train, Lockwood is hit on the head with a planter.  While on board, she becomes acquainted with Whitty and the two women sit and dine together.  Later, Lockwood takes a nap.  Upon waking up she discovers that Whitty is nowhere to be found.  To further complicate matters, none of the persons whom Lockwood and Whitty had met prior seem to know who Whitty is! They try to blame Lockwood's bonk on the head as the reason behind her confusion.  Lockwood is determined that Whitty is on board--where would she go on a moving train?  Lockwood reacquaints herself with Redgrave and the two set out to look for Whitty.  

After finding evidence of Whitty's existence on board and having suspicions about the intentions of others on board, Redgrave and Lockwood are convinced that something is afoot. Another cast of characters are introduced on board: a doctor, a nun, a magician, his aloof wife (or traveling companion), a younger (read: not young) woman, who calls herself "Countess," and a bandaged patient. 

The way that the mystery unfolds is very interesting and Hitchcock had his usual devices in place that may or may not have anything to do with the mystery. This was an excellent film and one of the best mysteries I've seen in a long time.  I found it interesting that both "damn" and "hell" are used in this film and used with their modern connotation.  I thought Redgrave looked very much like Errol Flynn (Flynn having an edge when it comes to looks) and even delivered his lines in a very Flynn-esque way.  While I very much enjoyed Redgrave's performance, I kept imagining Flynn delivering the lines and performing in the film.  I also really liked Lockwood.  Like I said, I'd never heard of her before TCM's spotlight.  I also recorded Night Train to Munich which I'm looking forward to watching.

I will definitely be getting The Lady Vanishes on Criterion.

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1 hour ago, rayban said:

I agree, the Hammer Horror films have a certain fascination.

The allure of "The Mummy" and "The Curse of the Mummy's Tomb", etc. never seems to fade.

One viewing is never enough.

and in large part it's because Hammer never made a film that I would say is fully satisfying- they all have some fault or shortcoming (some glaring, some minor- and it's usually related to the finale not being as good as it should be) that, again, i'd find irritating in an American film but intriguing and even endearing coming from The British and with such elegant packaging.

they are an endless fascination for me.

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11 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Night Monster (1942) - Minor horror mystery from Universal Pictures and director Ford Beebe. Several characters converge at the remote mansion home of crippled millionaire Kurt Ingston (Ralph Morgan), including doctors King (Lionel Atwill) and Harper (Irene Hervey) and writer Baldwin (Don Porter). Ingston hopes to impress everyone with the psychic power of his guest Agor Singh (Nils Asther), but the parlor tricks are sidelined when bodies start piling up, the work of a reputed monster stalking the fog-enshrouded grounds of the estate. Also featuring Bela Lugosi, Leif Erickson, Fay Helm, Doris Lloyd, Frank Reicher, Robert Homans, and Cyril Delevanti.

The atmosphere is appropriately spooky, particularly the outdoor scenes, and there are plenty of interesting actors in the cast. Unfortunately the two leads, played by Porter and Hervey, are rather dull. Erickson is amusing as a sex-crazed chauffeur, while Lugosi is wasted as the creepy butler. Not one of Universal's best, but far from their worst.   (6/10)

Source: TCM

4017ec76d45493c064caca3fb5781371.jpg

I you get the chance to watch it again, focus your attention on Leif Erickson. Besides his obvious flirtatious nature, which is a hoot to watch, there's a scene where he is standing behind Inston's wheelchair, and while the doctors and bantering back and forth, Leif rolls his eyes and makes several facial smirks, as if the conversation is boring him stiff. His dialogue... Oh, man!

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

"UM, EXCUSE US, WE'RE TRYING TO FILM 'THE WOLF MAN' ON THIS PART OF THE SET, COULD YOU 'NIGHT MONSTER' PEOPLE PUHLEEEEZE KEEP IT DOWN? And tell Lugosi to get his *** in a puffy shirt, we're shooting the gypsy camp scene in an hour."

 

(I know the chronology doesn't line up, but I'd like to imagine this happened between the two crews at some point.)

Could be. "Chaney! Get over here with those wolf man feet and take a walk on this here bridge, would you please?"

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Bowery At Midnight (1942) 

Bowery at Midnight Poster

Bela Lugosi playing the part of a Bowery Mission head who is also a master criminal with secret doors to his private office which has a secret entrance to a gang room and another through a electrical box to the street.

He plans crimes with the help of ex cons who show up at the Mission. He's got a file cabinet of their criminal records. Anyway the first part is quite dark almost Noir-ish, the second half changes gears and becomes this love story with everything brighter lit. If it would have stayed dark throughout you could almost call it a Noir. It even has Tom Neal from Detour as one of the hoods. 

His gang consists of a second banana who he uses for muscle, any ex cons that have say special skills like safe cracking "box men" and a floor sweeper go-fer type who used to be a doctor. The Doc is a junkie, he also gets to experiment on the dead bodies Lugosi leaves around. They also got a subterranean cemetery complete with ridiculous crosses with names, where they bury their dead. 

Their is a chuckle inducing scene where Lugosi and the Doc are looking over the cemetery and we cut to a kitten doing his business on a fresh grave. Lugosi says "can't you keep your cat from desecrating my graves!" 5/10

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1 hour ago, Janet0312 said:

Could be. "Chaney! Get over here with those wolf man feet and take a walk on this here bridge, would you please?"

Those too, although I’m thinking they just stole the paws from the prop dept. after hours full on Ed Wood rubber octopus style.

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2 hours ago, Janet0312 said:

I you get the chance to watch it again, focus your attention on Leif Erickson. Besides his obvious flirtatious nature, which is a hoot to watch, there's a scene where he is standing behind Inston's wheelchair, and while the doctors and bantering back and forth, Leif rolls his eyes and makes several facial smirks, as if the conversation is boring him stiff. His dialogue... Oh, man!

I was traveling and missed the WHOLE LUGOSI NIGHT!

[cry emoji x 5]

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"Fire Down Below" - Robert Parrish - 1957 -

This one is a film that seems to have gotten away from everyone - the scenarist, Irwin Shaw, the director, Robert Parrish, and the stars, Rita Hayworth, Robert Mitchum and Jack Lemmon -

what it's about is anyody's guess - probably a failed attempt at an epic-like adventure that involves three lost souls, two men and a woman -

there's a homoerotic relationship that involves Mitchum and Lemmon - Mitchum wants Hayworth to stay away from Lemmon - and later finds a way to destroy that relationship by letting Hayworth come onto him because she wants to save Lemmon from the kind of woman that she has become -

the film is very, very miscast - Mitchim as a beat-up loser that robs him of his unique vitality, Hayworth as a woman who has been passed around once too often that robs her of her unique vitality and Jack Lemmon as a hot young stud (?!) -

the water-logged finale, one of a kind, really, goes on for too long -

if it had been re-written and made much smaller, it might have had a chance -

d4cf402258d7767c568eadbd657.jpg?w=788

(Jack Lemmon as the sort of man who can only mean curtains for Rita Hayworth.)

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5 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Bowery At Midnight (1942) 

 

His gang consists of a second banana who he uses for muscle, any ex cons that have say special skills like safe cracking "box men" and a floor sweeper go-fer type who used to be a doctor. The Doc is a junkie, he also gets to experiment on the dead bodies Lugosi leaves around. They also got a subterranean cemetery complete with ridiculous crosses with names, where they bury their dead. 

 

The ending is confusing, which I will try not to spoil. But with that makeshift cemetery, who are all the living guys? (We find out who one is, anyway,  ... and how did he survive being shot a pointblank range?)

Funny bits from Bernard Gorcey as the tailor, and Pat Costello (looking incredibly like his brother Lou) as a bum.

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1 hour ago, scsu1975 said:

The ending is confusing, which I will try not to spoil. But with that makeshift cemetery, who are all the living guys? (We find out who one is, anyway,  ... and how did he survive being shot a pointblank range?)

Funny bits from Bernard Gorcey as the tailor, and Pat Costello (looking incredibly like his brother Lou) as a bum.

<spoilers>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The doctor was reviving all the bodies (zombies) and storing them in the fake grave.

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