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I know that Kingrat has already discussed "The Story On Page One".

I just wanted to add that this unfairly neglected courtroom drama is beautifully written, beautifully directed and beautifully acted.

It shows us that getting justice in this country is equivalent to being in a circus.

Whether you will come out "alive" or "dead" is never a foregone conclusion.

 

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I am very disappointed that there have been more horror films on TCM or TCM ON DEMAND, I have been scraping the bottom of the barrel of what AMC has to offer in their ON DEMAND section...so this morning i watched CHRISTINE (1983)- about which all that should really be said is that it was conceived after the author snorted several yards of cocaine and happened to catch a rerun of MY MOTHER THE CAR on TBS late one stormy night in Bangor, Maine.

what fascinated me way more than the movie was how AMC has stepped up their game when it comes to COMMERCIALS- I've often joked that if parts of movies happen to be shown during the commercials, so be it, but AMC is primarily there as an ad service.

THE COMMERCIALS ON AMC HAVE STARTED HAVING COMMERCIALS.

No lie. There will be a promo for THE WALKING DEAD that is interrupted by an ad for a clorox mop.

it's also worth noting that there were several moments where a scene IN THE MOVIE that they were occasionally airing was outright interrupted, by a sudden onset commercial break. two characters would be in the middle of talking and then....WALKING DEAD PROMO which was interrutped by CLOROX MOP AD, followed by the teaser for ELI ROTH'S HISTORY OF HORROR for the 514th time...then back to the scene, mid-dialogue.

viewing the movie this way kind of gave it a JEAN-LUC GODDARD feel, but to be honest, don't really like BREATHLESS.

 

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Its one more additional reason I don't watch media anymore. The commercialization is pervasive, to an insane level. Its just not good mental hygiene to be constantly bombarded by nonstop advertising.

Maybe I'd be easier about it if I resided somewhere else besides NYC. But here in my town, you are "shrink-wrapped" by ads ...at all times ...whenever you're out in public.

There's ads on the sides of buses and trains; ads on the insides of buses and trains. Ads on the tops of taxi-cabs passing by; and if you get in a taxi there's a little TV screen embedded into the seat facing you.

There's ads beamed by lasers onto the sidewalks outside storefronts; right under your feet as you walk. Hanging signs, stretched on strings, between storefronts and lamp-posts above the sidewalk. And in all the shop-windows.

Train stations and bus stops of course. Even the stairs and railings on staircases in a train station.

Skyscrapers have giant blinking displays all around their facades, up to about the 3rd or 4th story above ground.

People dress in ads--everyone's shirt or hat, has a slogan or saying.

Aisles in stores. More walking on ads. Of course, coming across the loudspeakers too. (You have to wear earplugs or headphones anytime you shop).

If you avoid public transportation and drive your own car--well, some companies send out fleets of ad-vehicles which drive up right alongside of you, on the expressway.

Finally, in desperation --you gaze up at the sky and what do you see? Planes skywriting ads or hauling banners around the city.

So: no TV for me. No way.

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Watched Burt Reynolds, Matt Clark, Bo Hopkins, Jennifer Billingsley, and Ned Beatty in "White Lightning" on TCM last night whilst enjoying some pizza. I liked the pizza, but didn't like the movie. Ugh. Simplistic plot; but also much too "boondocks" for my taste. And there's just something at times, really seamy and unsavory about Burt Reynolds in more than a few of his flicks. He just ...'smirks' too much. I'll take him as Print Asper in 'Gunsmoke' but leave his films mostly unviewed.

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In all fairness TCM is really the only kind of television I'd even be interested in watching anymore, at this point in my adulthood. Its the only channel I'd trust; of course I don't have any familiarity with all these other services which I'm sure are all well and good. I just don't like being dependent on these faceless companies and their faceless minions. You get to liking something too much and sooner-or-later you're shafted because they take it away, or change it. The horror of what happened over at AMC...sad.

The bottom line for me is that I don't want any cable service in my home, since it means accepting all the other nonsense which comes along with owning a television. Helpdesks, accounts, passwords, wires and cords, bills-arriving-in-the-mail; remote-controls; program guides...commercials...etc etc etc.

I do have two TVs in my little den; actually. One is the aforementioned Magnavox 13". Pre-cable era. It's in the kitchen, on a wall-mount up in the corner of the ceiling. Left there by a previous tenant. It receives a few local channels; public-access stations and the like; and its always good for white-noise as I mentioned earlier.

The other is a more-modern, Sony, 23" curved screen, which sits in my wardrobe under my laundry. Ha! Its cable-compliant but I keep it around only for the possible occasion that I should want to insert a DVD I may still have lying around.

That urge is very rare these days: I am much more of a book-reader than I am comfortable with passive, electronic media. It makes me squirm and fidget to sit idly on a sofa with my eyes locked on a glass tube. Feels Orwellian and mindless. Life's too short to spend it endlessly watching made-in-Taiwan screens and monitors.

Until two years ago, I hadn't viewed TCM in probably the preceding ten years. I'm a work-a-holic and I'm 100% absorbed by my career. But then two yrs ago, in my neighborhood, a corner bar unexpectedly changed hands and went from a dive to an upscale jazz restaurant. And in keeping with this classic aesthetic, they only play TCM on one lone, bar TV; perched above the bottles. Most other pubs --as you probably know-- usually play sports or news (despicable! I avoid such garbage-media like plague).

So there you have it. Only by fortuitous chance do I find myself regularly watching movies again. If it was any other type of fare, I would turn my back to it and imbibe my Rx medicinal extracts (which arrive direct from Scotland and Ireland in large cases) gazing out at the shoppers and strollers.

But yeah this is how I've gotten somewhat back in the swing of things.

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What am I good at? Oh these little scribbles? Well I thankee for that kind word. But there's quite a handful of facile and eloquent film reviewers on this forum I've seen so far. TopBill'd stands out for sure--but there's others too. That guy who reviewed 'Escape from Fort Bravo'--which I read on friday--now that was a doozy!

The real struggle of course is taking place between myself and 'CigarJoe' in the noir section. That's shaping up into a very enjoyable ideological clash of wills.

He's an articulate guy and I'm at pains to ensure he knows this is all in good, clean, fun as far as I'm concerned. I'm simply a purist when it comes to noir! And I'm tenacious about it. Whichever way it wends, its the meatiest discussion I've enjoyed in some time. I admire a man who sticks to his ground, as he does. Hear that, Cigar Man? I'm talking to you!

Getting ready now --showered and changed--to venture out and see what's playing at my 'TCM bar'. Its blustery here tonight in NYC. Really good burger is waiting for me up the street.

The only thing bad about it is --and you are sure to hear about this from me in future--other patrons drinking/eating at my elbow who do not know what they're looking at on screen and who make all sorts of daft guesses about what they're viewing. As a classics fan it is tough to endure. Hearing someone confuse Don Knotts with Don Rickles or someone stating firmly that Lauren Hutton stars in 'White Lightning' when instead she appeared in 'Gator' instead. Nails on a blackboard!

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7 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

The real struggle of course is taking place between myself and 'CigarJoe' in the noir section. That's shaping up into a very enjoyable ideological clash of wills.

He's an articulate guy and I'm at pains to ensure he knows this is all in good, clean, fun as far as I'm concerned. I'm simply a purist when it comes to noir! And I'm tenacious about it. Whichever way it wends, its the meatiest discussion I've enjoyed in some time. I admire a man who sticks to his ground, as he does. Hear that, Cigar Man? I'm talking to you!

Hey Sgt;  How that you're an 'advanced member' instead of a newbie,   the gloves are going to come off.   That is what happens to those that mess with the noir experts at this forum.   

Of course I'm talking about myself,  ha ha!    

Like I said before you have been a breath of fresh air to the forum, especially be being back from the dead long lost threads,  like that review of Escape From Fort Bravo.      So keep up the good work. 

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"The Ghost and Mrs. Muir" tonight. Rex Harrison was a handsome devil wasn't he? He should have sprouted a beard more often. What a strange persona. Gene Tierney, fetching of course...but I prefer her as a villain.

At least tonight no one sitting next to me called her "Jane" Tierney. Augh!

Mediocre viewing all the same this evening. Because even worse, another Don Knotts outing. Only two weekends ago, it was "The Incredible Mister Limpet". What's up with that, I'm sure I don't know.

I'll stick to radio this weekend. I can't hang out in a bar until 12 am when "noir alley" starts. And its a good one tonight too. "Follow Me Quietly". Dang! Why can't TCM put dogs like Don Knotts on at 12 am and put hard-hitting crime flicks on at 9pm when decent, God-fearing folks are following doctor's orders to stay hydrated on a Saturday night?

Oh well. Eh. I did learn tonight where the rumor of Ben M's "Hollywood background" comes from. His great uncle, Joseph M? Sorry no. Brrrrzap. Doesn't count!

Anyway. Thanks for the kindly words Jazz Man. Y'know, I've been called a lot of things since the development of the internet but 'breath of fresh air' is a novel one, I must say. I hope these serendipitous sobriquets don't wind up sticking in anyone's craw. Heck, I usually do alright on a forum, if I can avoid being thrown out on my ear!

'Noir experts' ...I put you on notice ...you may come to regret extending me such open-armed bonhomie.

I promise you! :ph34r:

 

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Might I suggest those without means to pay for classic movie subscription viewing try borrowing DVDs from the library? For the one time cost of about $40, a basic BluRay player can give classic film joy for years. Often I find myself reading "Next Month's Schedule is Up" thread here and choosing a few movies from the suggestions. I'll borrow it the week it's broadcast on TCM, to join in on any conversation.

Also, TV antennas can be purchased for $10-15 and several digital over-the air stations broadcast classic movies. But I'm with you-I hate commercials (although they're somewhat tolerable when viewing classic TV shows, often as a snack or bathroom break)

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I already have these 2 Baby Peggy movies on VHS (copied to DVD) I purchased in 2002.  I take a quick view for comparison during commercial breaks. The music don't hold a candle to the Jack Hardy (Grapevine) versions.

Man that is a BIG bear called Grandfather in "Mega Monsters - Beast of Fear Island" on the Science Channel. 7 feet high on all fours, 13 when standing. :o

 

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"Peg O' The Mounted" (1924) Baby Peggy short on TCM Silent Sunday Nights.  Added it to  another short I recorded last year "Such As Life" (1924).  This may be the only way her lost films may still be found, by foreign sources.

hqdefault.jpg

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On 10/27/2018 at 10:57 PM, Sgt_Markoff said:

"The Ghost and Mrs. Muir" tonight. Rex Harrison was a handsome devil wasn't he? He should have sprouted a beard more often. What a strange persona. Gene Tierney, fetching of course...but I prefer her as a villain.

At least tonight no one sitting next to me called her "Jane" Tierney. Augh.

I'll stick to radio this weekend.

 

if you'd like to listen to the radio version with CHARLES BOYER and JANE WYATT in the title roles, here it is;

 

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Thanks. Hey I have a fresh question (unrelated to anything above). Did Kate Hepburn and Bette Davis get along? I can't recall they ever worked with one another, right? If they did get along, why do we suppose that was? Why didn't they ever have a feud like Bette & Joan? Both Kate/Bette ...iron-willed termagants...

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"Blood From The Mummy's Tomb" - Seth Holt - 1971 -

this one is the fourth in the Hammer Film Franchise for the Mummy -

"Spoiler Alert" -

this one doesn't exactly have "a mummy" -

it has an exceptionally well-perserved corpse who is waiting to be re-incarnated in a concealed cellar -

I myself would have preferred an actual mummy as in the first three films -

the daughter of the main male protagonist is going to be the route by which that well-perserved corpse will re-enter the world -

she was born at the time the expedition team desecrated her tomb -

and the corpse was minus her right hand -

the young lady in question in the company of a loving boyfriend tries to find out what exactly is troubling her -

it's the well-perserved corpse in daddy's cellar waiting impatiently to come back and, at the same time, getting back at the desecreators -

a nicely-handled variation by the director, Seth Holt and the large ensemble cast, including Valerie Leon and Mark Edwards -

blood%20from%20the%20mummys%20tomb%2004.

(Darling, what exactly is daddy growing in the cellar?)

MV5BYzNmYTM4OWItYzg3NS00NTZiLWFmZjUtZjEx

(Darling, this ring that daddy gave me is killing me.)

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Brainstorm (1983 -- via Filmstruck) -- review originally posted at another site.
A very mixed offering. I had heard about about this film, how could one familiar with Natalie Wood not know about this one?, but unfortunately the plot is very, very thin and as such the film comes across more as a series of images than an actual film. I watched it really for Natalie. Her role is not large, but in her final work, she's still beautiful, still touching, very graceful. It's hard to fathom that she died before filming ended. Christopher Walken is good, and Louise Fletcher makes the strongest impression in the cast. What really puts the film up to this rating though are the visuals. There are some astonishing images in this film, and it seems like a major oversight that it was not nominated for Visual Effects at the Oscars that year.

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2 hours ago, rayban said:

"Blood From The Mummy's Tomb" - Seth Holt - 1971 -

this one is the fourth in the Hammer Film Franchise for the Mummy -

"Spoiler Alert" -

this one doesn't exactly have "a mummy" -

it has an exceptionally well-perserved corpse who is waiting to be re-incarnated in a concealed cellar -

I myself would have preferred an actual mummy as in the first three films -

the daughter of the main male protagonist is going to be the route by which that well-perserved corpse will re-enter the world -

she was born at the time the expedition team desecrated her tomb -

It's actually a version of the same Bram Stoker story that was filmed much later and sillier as The Awakening (1980), with Charlton Heston as the archeologist.

the-awakening-6.jpg

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2 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Brainstorm (1983 -- via Filmstruck) -- review originally posted at another site.
A very mixed offering. I had heard about about this film, how could one familiar with Natalie Wood not know about this one?, but unfortunately the plot is very, very thin and as such the film comes across more as a series of images than an actual film. I watched it really for Natalie. Her role is not large, but in her final work, she's still beautiful, still touching, very graceful. It's hard to fathom that she died before filming ended. Christopher Walken is good, and Louise Fletcher makes the strongest impression in the cast. What really puts the film up to this rating though are the visuals. There are some astonishing images in this film, and it seems like a major oversight that it was not nominated for Visual Effects at the Oscars that year.

 

Tip, when you copy and paste "rich text", click on Paste as plain text, and it will come out like this. :)

 

A very mixed offering. I had heard about about this film, how could one familiar with Natalie Wood not know about this one?, but unfortunately the plot is very, very thin and as such the film comes across more as a series of images than an actual film. I watched it really for Natalie. Her role is not large, but in her final work, she's still beautiful, still touching, very graceful. It's hard to fathom that she died before filming ended. Christopher Walken is good, and Louise Fletcher makes the strongest impression in the cast. What really puts the film up to this rating though are the visuals. There are some astonishing images in this film, and it seems like a major oversight that it was not nominated for Visual Effects at the Oscars that year.

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Where The Sidewalk Ends (1950) A Street Scene Noir

1955-half-sheet.jpg

The "Street Scene" score for Where The Sidewalk Ends is by Alfred Newman.

It was originally used for Street Scene (1931) and was re-cycled by 20th Century Fox as a sort of New York City Noir signature theme. It crops up on, Cry Of The City, Kiss Of Death, I Wake Up Screaming, and The Dark Corner.

The film was directed and produced by Otto Preminger (it's one of the five Classic Film Noir he directed). The writing credits are Ben Hecht for the screenplay. Victor Trivas, Frank P. Rosenberg, and Robert E. Kent  for the story adaptation of the novel Night Cry by William L. Stuart.

The film stars Dana Andrews as sadistic Detective Sgt. Mark Dixon, Gene Tierney as Morgan Taylor-Paine,Gary Merrill as Tommy Scalise, Bert Freed as Detective Sgt. Paul Klein (Dixon's partner), Tom Tully as Jiggs Taylor, Morgan's father, Karl Malden as Detective Lt. Thomas, Ruth Donnelly as Martha, owner of Martha's Cafe, and Craig Stevens as Kenneth Paine.

This film was mostly shot in New York City. There are quite a few establishing shots obviously on location. Other studio shots (either Kaufman or Gold Meadow don't know which) and sets make use of various New York City back screen projections. Being a former New York City resident, it's fun to figure out where some of the films neighborhoods are supposed to be. A wall map in the 16th Precinct squad room shows on the East 5th Avenue, West to the Hudson and from Central Park South  to 42nd Street. The 16th Precinct covered the area of Manhattan between W. 42nd St. and W. 52nd St. West of Fifth Avenue to the Hudson River. Its station house was on W. 47th Street. It encompassed Times Square and Hell's Kitchen. A rear screen projection in the opening sequence shows Chinatown and then a squad car passing the entrance sign to the Holland Tunnel, then it shows the skyline from what appears to be the West Side Highway. A backdrop through the window of the precinct house detective squad locker room shows the Paramount building and it's clock tower at 1501 Broadway. Anybody who's read Cornell Woolrich's Dead Line At Dawn, knows it plays a prominent part in the novel.

Another scene of the Taylor apartment shows the George Washington Bridge through a window, giving it a Washington Heights local. There is a scene down on Pike Street where the Manhattan Bridge is in the background its The Lower East Side. Later a body is recovered from the East River between the Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridges, Chinatown. Another sequence has what appears to be an "el" station. The nearest to the Pike Street Lower East Side location would have been the 3rd Avenue el, but this one is a case of "movie" geography, There would have been no "el" station visible from Pike Street, the only other feasible possibility would be a subway train stopping on it's way over the Manhattan Bridge but there are no stations on the Manhattan Bridge.

The main difference in the novel Night Cry is that Paine has Morgan as his girlfriend rather than as an ex wife. Dixon still gets rough with him and accidentally kills him. In the novel it's Morgan who is the suspect in Paine's murder.

The film was supposed to try and keep the burner going under the Andrews/Tierney magic that ignited in the film Laura. It does manage to create some sympathy for Dixon's character once his backstory is revealed. Scalise is played to the hilt by Gary Merrill, he comes off as sort of a less sleasy more suave, slicker version of most of the type of characters played by Dan Duryea. Merrill obviously got more traction out of this. He did make quite a few more noirs but I've never seen half of them, Another Man's Poison (1951), Phone Call from a Stranger (1952), Night Without Sleep (1952), The Human Jungle (1954). I have seen A Blueprint for Murder (1953), Witness to Murder (1954) and the Transitional Noirs The Savage Eye (1960), and The Incident (1967). 

Entertaining 8/10 Full review in Film Noir Gangster.

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Last night was the first time I ever heard of or saw MAD LOVE('35) with PETER LORRE and COLIN CLIVE.

I must admit I've seen the "murderer's hands grafted on a concert pianist" thing done on several other films before, and done much better.  ;)  But it was an odd look for Lorre, and everything else aside, loved the cinematography.  And too, I've killed that much time with much worse crap.

Sepiatone

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26 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Last night was the first time I ever heard of or saw MAD LOVE('35) with PETER LORRE and COLIN CLIVE.

I must admit I've seen the "murderer's hands grafted on a concert pianist" thing done on several other films before, and done much better.  ;)  But it was an odd look for Lorre, and everything else aside, loved the cinematography.  And too, I've killed that much time with much worse crap.

Sepiatone

GREGG TOLAND, who later shot a little flick called CITIZEN KANE did the cinematography. I think PAULINE KAEL postulated at length that MAD LOVE was a major influence on KANE.

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Panic In The Streets (1950) New Orleans Noir

 Panic_in_the_Streets_%25281950%2529.jpg
The Granddaddy New Orleans Noir

It's sort of a companion piece to The Killer That Stalked New York (1950). This go round the dead man found in the Mississippi is carrying pneumonic plague.

For those who may ask, pneumonic plague is a severe lung infection caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. The symptoms include fever, headache, shortness of breath, chest pain, and cough. These symptoms typically start about three to seven days after exposure. It is one of three forms of plague, the other two being septicemic plague and the more familiar bubonic plague.

The pneumonic form of plague may occur following an initial bubonic or septicemic plague infection.

 
The cast is excellent. There are some great sequences in the film. The intense scenes between Poldi, Fitch and B*l*a*c*kie, the chase in and on the roof of the coffee warehouse, the scramble of the fugitives like rats under the docks. It hits on all cylinders. 10/10 Full review with screen caps here in Film Noir/Gangster.

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I watched the 1932 version of DR JEE-KELL AND MR HYDE last night, I also happened to catch the ending of the terrible 1941 version when it aired this weekend, [the ending to it always kills me: [flat whisper] "I'm Dr. Jekyll. I'm Dr Henry Jekyll. I'm Dr Jekyll, I'm Dr Henry Jekyll, I'm Dr Jekyll...."]

SEX IS JUST ALL OVER THE 1932 VERSION!!!, in fact- if anyone can think of a more SEX-OBSESSED Pre Code horror, let me know, cause I can't. IT SEEMS to be the primary motivator for both characters- it's pretty obvious in the scenes between JEEkell and his fiancee's father and it's in plain sight in Hyde's scenes with MIRIAM HOPKINS- who I think gives the best performance in the movie in spite of letting her native Georgian accent slip a couple of times. it's a bold, fearless turn- every bit as much a risk as March's, and she dominates her scenes (one wonders if a young BETTE DAVIS took mental notes which she cited frequently when she did OF HUMAN BONDAGE.)

image?id=856340776611%26t=50%26plc=WEB%2

While I'm glad someone won an Oscar for a Horror Movie early in the game, I think MARCH missteps as JEEKELL, especially in the lecture hall scenes, but as HYDE- he excels, especially in the BODY LANGUAGE and movements of the character- the minute he becomes HYDE- you can tell he is having a BLAST.

the art direction was superb as was the camera work and sound- this is one of the most technically accomplished films of the 1930's.

 

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

GREGG TOLAND, who later shot a little flick called CITIZEN KANE did the cinematography. I think PAULINE KAEL postulated at length that MAD LOVE was a major influence on KANE.

Yep, I knew TOLAND did the cinematography in last night's flick, along with CHESTER LYONS, another fine cinematographer, who sadly died barely over a year after this movie was released.

Sepiatone

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11 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Yep, I knew TOLAND did the cinematography in last night's flick, along with CHESTER LYONS, another fine cinematographer, who sadly died barely over a year after this movie was released.

Sepiatone

MAD LOVE needs a more dynamic finale. I like it, but that is its one big failing.

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