Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

1 minute ago, LawrenceA said:

Under My Skin (1950)  -  6/10

adunder.jpg

 

This rarely seen Garfield film falls flat. However, the actor would soon have a far more impressive encounter with a Hemingway film adaption with The Breaking Point.

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Thanks for the pictures, Tom. Raymond Burr looks almost handsome with that pensive gaze off-camera. Rhonda Fleming and Julie Newmar look sensational.

Yeh, my writing couldn't hope to do proper justice to the two ladies. That's why I posted the photos. Newmar, in particular, is quite sensuous as she slowly undulates before the camera.

And I agree that Burr looks surprisingly good in this film, too, to be honest, much more so than we usually think of regarding this character actor as far as good looks are concerned.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The White Tower (1950)  -  6/10

MV5BYTNjM2QxMmUtYjEyNC00OWM0LTgzMjUtOWUz

Sluggish Technicolor mountain-climbing drama. Alida Valli stars as a woman who has sworn to climb the title peak in the Alps, a summit which has never been bested and which killed her father in the attempt. She brings along a handful of people to help, including Glenn Ford, Lloyd Bridges, Oscar Homolka, Cedric Hardwicke, and Claude Rains. This is slow to get moving, but when they eventually get to the mountain there's some nice scenery to go along with the obvious studio shots.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

My mind is kinda blown.

Heretofore, I had never seen any of MARTY (1955)- but I caught a lot of it this morning and, damned if I didn't like it quite a bit. 

I'm also trying to process the fact that, while on the one hand, he's outright awful to "Ernest Borgnine"** in everything else I've seen him in, and I have seen him in some ****: THE DEVIL'S RAIN, POSEIDON ADVENTURE MERLIN'S MAGICAL SHOP OF MYSTICAL WONDERS, LASER MISSION, LYLAH CLARE, THE DEVIL'S RAIN...ERNEST BORGNINE IS EXCELLENT IN THIS.

And it's a charming movie with an ending that could not be better.

Also noteworthy for some authentic NYC street scenery ca. 1954, some prescient discussion of the threat posed by big supermarkets to small businesses, some great dialogue and a BRUTAL TAKEDOWN of MICKEY SPILLANE, whose RING OF FEAR is playing at a cinema the film's main characters walk past.

Damn it, I do so dislike having my worldview challenged. 

 

**and by that I mean projects that may not be terrible that he happens to be in, but he is still playing "Ernest Borgnine" in said projects , like BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK and THE WILD BUNCH and FROM HERE TO ETERNITY and that crab thing on SPONGEBOB.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Butler's Night Off (1951)  -  3/10

280full.jpg

Absolutely dreadful Canadian crime comedy about an orphanage manager (Paul Colbert), a rich man's daughter (Mary Hennessy), and her father's butler (Peter Sturgess) who run afoul of a gang of crooks led by Mr. Carson (Charles Rittenhouse). Also featuring Eric Workman, Willard Sage, Maurice Gauvin, and making his film debut, a 20-year-old William Shatner. I watched this for Shatner's debut, although his role is minor, and he only has a couple of lines. He plays the most aggressive of the crooks, and gets to knock some people around. Otherwise this movie is of little entertainment value, as it's poorly made and badly written. As far as I can recall, this is the earliest Canadian movie that I've seen, in the sense of a film made in Canada for the the Canadian market by Canadians. There are a few Montreal location shots, but most of it is studio-bound.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

My mind is kinda blown.

Heretofore, I had never seen any of MARTY (1955)- but I caught a lot of it this morning and, damned if I didn't like it quite a bit. 

I'm also trying to process the fact that, while on the one hand, he's outright awful to "Ernest Borgnine"** in everything else I've seen him in, and I have seen him in some ****: THE DEVIL'S RAIN, POSEIDON ADVENTURE MERLIN'S MAGICAL SHOP OF MYSTICAL WONDERS, LASER MISSION, LYLAH CLARE, THE DEVIL'S RAIN...ERNEST BORGNINE IS EXCELLENT IN THIS.

And it's a charming movie with an ending that could not be better.

Also noteworthy for some authentic NYC street scenery ca. 1954, some prescient discussion of the threat posed by big supermarkets to small businesses, some great dialogue and a BRUTAL TAKEDOWN of MICKEY SPILLANE, whose RING OF FEAR is playing at a cinema the film's main characters walk past.

Damn it, I do so dislike having my worldview challenged. 

 

**and by that I mean projects that may not be terrible that he happens to be in, but he is still playing "Ernest Borgnine" in said projects , like BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK and THE WILD BUNCH and FROM HERE TO ETERNITY and that crab thing on SPONGEBOB.

Excuse me Ernest Borgnine does not play a crab in Spongebob. He is Mermaid Man, half of a superhero team (other half is Barnacle Boy voiced by Tim Conway) that live in Bikini Bottom. 

Lol. 

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/31/2019 at 10:10 PM, LawrenceA said:

Edge of Doom (1950)  -  6/10

220px-Edge_of_Doom_movie_poster.JPG

Crime drama with Farley Granger as a desperate young man who commits a violent crime and then tries to escape capture. Nice-guy priest Dana Andrews tries to help out. With Joan Evans, Robert Keith, Paul Stewart, Mala Powers, and Adele Jergens. The moral lessons come on too strong, and the film ends up being a commercial for the Catholic Church, which may appeal to some viewers. However, I liked many of the scenes of sweaty desperation and paranoia.

My father attended Catholic University with Leo Brady, the author of the book on which this movie is based.  When it came out, it was a real big deal for Catholics at the time, but apparently, the film was a disappointment.  Anyway, my dad was also a writer (mostly short stories) but ended up an English teacher, and perhaps had a bit of jealousy of Brady's success.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Heretofore, I had never seen any of MARTY (1955)- but I caught a lot of it this morning and, damned if I didn't like it quite a bit. 

I'm also trying to process the fact that, while on the one hand, he's outright awful to "Ernest Borgnine"** in everything else I've seen him in, and I have seen him in some ****: THE DEVIL'S RAIN, POSEIDON ADVENTURE MERLIN'S MAGICAL SHOP OF MYSTICAL WONDERS, LASER MISSION, LYLAH CLARE, THE DEVIL'S RAIN...ERNEST BORGNINE IS EXCELLENT IN THIS.

34 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I just re-read my MARTY review, it was a real mess and I'm sorry for it. I think I was still in shock over liking it so much.

So much that you forgot to tell us who the outright-awful "He" was (Ben Mankie?)..."He" who, who he, pray tell?

I keep trying to watch Marty every time it turns up on the Streaming Orphans, but haven't gotten around to it yet, and I'll admit I'm more curious for the Borgnine original than I was for John Candy's 1991 remake.

1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

Excuse me Ernest Borgnine does not play a crab in Spongebob. He is Mermaid Man, half of a superhero team (other half is Barnacle Boy voiced by Tim Conway) that live in Bikini Bottom. 

At least heterosexual people like me have an excuse not to know the slightest Spongebob reference.  😛

(And if it was Cartoon Network, I'd understand their deep-seated neurotic issues with "Superfriends"'s Aquaman--as we saw displayed in the recent movie--but Nickelodeon?)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Cave of Outlaws (1951)  -  6/10

dc1ceb873f0f7e22173361fe8fb06347.jpg

Technicolor western directed by William Castle. Macdonald Carey stars as a man who has been in prison for 15 years for a robbery in which the gold was never discovered, but it believed to be stashed in a vast network of caves in the nearby hills. Now that Carey is free, everyone is watching him to see when he'll get the gold. Featuring Alexis Smith, Edgar Buchanan, Victor Jory, Hugh O'Brian, and Russ Tamblyn. This is unremarkable, though not bad. I watched it because one source said that Lee Marvin made an appearance in it. He didn't.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, TomJH said:

Serpent of the Nile (1953)

FXM has been running Legions of the Nile, a film that's been badly dubbed from Italian and panned-and-scanned, but it's equally silly.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

As far as I can recall, this is the earliest Canadian movie that I've seen, in the sense of a film made in Canada for the the Canadian market by Canadians.

Have you seen Back to God's Country?  

(The silent version, not the 1953 Rock Hudson version you might be getting to soon.  I haven't seen the Rock Hudson version.)

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Under My Skin (1950)  -  6/10

adunder.jpg

 

According to IMDb, Micheline Presle sings "Stranger in the Night", although it's not the Frank Sinatra song.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Der Verlorene aka The Lost One (1951)  -  8/10

0003479-der-verlorene-1951-with-switchab

Intriguing West German drama written & directed by and starring Peter Lorre. He plays a doctor working at a refugee camp after the end of WWII. An encounter with a former colleague (Karl John) forces Lorre to confront his actions during the war, which are shown via flashbacks. Also featuring Helmuth Rudolph, Johanna Hofer, Renate Mannhardt, and Eva Ingeborg Scholz. This was a passion project for Lorre, who was a low point in his life and career when the opportunity finally came to make this. It has loads of dark, melancholy atmosphere, with excellent set design and cinematography. This also ranks as one of Lorre's finest performances. Unfortunately, it was a failure at the box-office, as German audiences avoided films that addressed wartime behavior and guilt. Lorre was crushed, and never out forth as much effort in his career from then on, working only for the paycheck. He gained a lot of weight, had multiple relapses into morphine addiction which he had originally kicked back in the early 1940's, and died of a stroke 13 years after this film's release.

10166.jpg

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Distant Drums (1951)  -  7/10

Distant-Drums.jpg

Technicolor historical adventure, ably directed by Raoul Walsh, set in the south of Florida in 1840 during the Second Seminole War. Gary Cooper stars as an Army captain in charge of a squadron of soldiers fighting the Seminole Indians in and around the Everglades, as well as Spanish gunrunners. Also featuring Richard Webb, Mari Aldon, Arthur Hunnicutt, Ray Teal, Darren McGavin, and Robert Barratt as Zachary Taylor. The movie is a little corny and definitely not PC, but I warmed to it thanks in large part to filming locations. A scene at a Spanish fort was shot in St. Augustine, about an hour's drive east of me, and a place that I've visited many times. Some of the river scenes were shot in Silver Springs in Ocala, which is an hour's drive south of me. This movie is also memorable (or lamentable, depending on your sentiment) for introducing the "Wilhelm scream", a male scream sound effect that has subsequently been used over 150 times in other films, even up to this year, often thrown in as a cinephile in-joke. The actual performer of the scream, recording during post, is said to be Sheb Wooley, who also appears uncredited as one of the background soldiers.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Distant Drums (1951)  -  7/10

Distant-Drums.jpg

Technicolor historical adventure, ably directed by Raoul Walsh, set in the south of Florida in 1840 during the Second Seminole War. Gary Cooper stars as an Army captain in charge of a squadron of soldiers fighting the Seminole Indians in and around the Everglades, as well as Spanish gunrunners. Also featuring Richard Webb, Mari Aldon, Arthur Hunnicutt, Ray Teal, Darren McGavin, and Robert Barratt as Zachary Taylor. The movie is a little corny and definitely not PC, but I warmed to it thanks in large part to filming locations. A scene at a Spanish fort was shot in St. Augustine, about an hour's drive east of me, and a place that I've visited many times. Some of the river scenes were shot in Silver Springs in Ocala, which is an hour's drive south of me. This movie is also memorable (or lamentable, depending on your sentiment) for introducing the "Wilhelm scream", a male scream sound effect that has subsequently been used over 150 times in other films, even up to this year, often thrown in as a cinephile in-joke. The actual performer of the scream, recording during post, is said to be Sheb Wooley, who also appears uncredited as one of the background soldiers.

 

I guess Distant Drums isn't so much a western as it is a south eastern adventure film. In any event the story is, in essence, a variation of Objective Burma, also directed by Walsh who, by the way, considered Gary Cooper one of his best friends. The screenplay of both films even have the same line of dialogue at one point, "It was a slaughterhouse" in describing the results of an ambush by the enemy (Japanese in one film, Seminole Indians in the other).

Link to post
Share on other sites

"Child 44" (2015) nice crime drama during the 1950's in the Soviet Union revolving around a serial killer targeting young boys.  Movie hits home how hard it is to get any accurate statistics of the murder rate since it was denied by the state...There is no murder in paradise.

Audience channel presented it in the 2.35 widescreen format.  Rack up another one for Gary Oldman.

220px-Child_44_poster.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

When Michael Calls (1972)  -  6/10

When-Michael-Calls-1.jpg

Made-for-TV thriller with Elizabeth Ashley as a divorced mother who begins receiving phone calls from a boy who was found dead 15 years earlier. The eerie voice warns of impending danger, and soon the bodies begin to appear. Also starring Ben Gazzara as her ex-husband, Michael Douglas as a child psychologist, Al Waxman, Larry Reynolds, and Karen Pearson. This was based on a book by John Farris and scripted by James Bridges (The Paper ChaseThe China Syndrome). It has several unsettling moments, but much is undone by a terribly cheesy voice for the ghostly kid, and an ending that can be seen from a mile away. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, hamradio said:

Movie hits home how hard it is to get any accurate statistics of the murder rate since it was denied by the state...There is no murder in paradise.

Reminds me of the writer in The Lives of Others and how he decided to write an article on how East Germany stopped publishing suicide statistics.

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, TomJH said:

ML0YoFG.png

Serpent of the Nile

I never understand why Hollywood used bronze paint to cover skin. The medium and the bronze itself is toxic and doesn't really shine like gold.

Real gold, even 10k could easily be used. It will completely stick to skin using water and is completely inert. Harder to apply? Yes, but so much better. Maybe real gold glares from the lights too much.

On very hot days if I'm sweating when applying gold leaf, it easily sticks to my skin until showering it off.

And I always found Raymond Burr very handsome, even in Perry Mason. Those dark brooding eyes.

17 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Under My Skin (1950)

adunder.jpg

Wow I sure find that image of Garfield & Prelle in the poster suggestive. It seems John Garfield was often portrayed as a controlling, smug kind of woman hater.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I never understand why Hollywood used bronze paint to cover skin. The medium and the bronze itself is toxic and doesn't really shine like gold.

Real gold, even 10k could easily be used. It will completely stick to skin using water and is completely inert. Harder to apply? Yes, but so much better. Maybe real gold glares from the lights too much.

On very hot days if I'm sweating when applying gold leaf, it easily sticks to my skin until showering it off.

And I always found Raymond Burr very handsome, even in Perry Mason. Those dark brooding eyes.

 

 

Hubba.

In an interview with Julie Newmar the actress responded to the statement that the above video is on You Tube.

That is 18 years old. They painted my body gold. They found a technique where the poor model didn't die. I was wearing a tummy covering bikini as it were. This was so long ago that belly buttons were not allowed on screen. I was covered in gold, doing a backward arch and they yelled, "Stop!" They come running in with scotch tape and put it over my belly button.

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, EricJ said:

.....[in your MARTY review] you forgot to tell us who the outright-awful "He" was (Ben Mankie?)..."He" who, who he, pray tell?

I keep trying to watch Marty every time it turns up on the Streaming Orphans, but haven't gotten around to it yet, and I'll admit I'm more curious for the Borgnine original than I was for John Candy's 1991 remake.

😛

My circuits were so blown from watching BORGNINE deliver the goods in MARTY, what I was trying to say was- that in the dozen or so films I have seen him in, "He" (meaning ERNEST BORGNINE) was either baaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaad to the degree where I questioned his outright proficiency as an actor (see: his line read "ha-ha" in MERLIN'S SHOP OF MYSTICAL WONDERS or his final scene in THE DEVIL'S RAIN] or he [more often the case] has played some variation of himself, ie, "ERNEST "McHALE!!!" BORGNINE"

But, there is this scene in MARTY where  he and his date are leaving the STARDUST BALLROOM and walking along the street and- out of giddy nervousness- he will not stop talking. It is, as I recall, a single-take tracking shot scene and about five minutes long and he has to spout off, gosh, five pages of dialogue? it was also, by all indications, filmed on an actual exterior street in New York City.

It's a trial by fire scene for any actor, really up there with the soliloquies of Hamlet and Tom Joad, and BORGNINE not only hits the marks and nails the lines, he keeps you involved in the scene the whole entire time.

I really, really recommend MARTY- especially to any of you aspiring writers. In many ways it reminded me of MOONLIGHT from a couple years ago, just a simple story of two lonely people.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...