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On 2/1/2019 at 6:58 PM, LawrenceA said:

The Mudlark (1950)  -  7/10

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Light historical drama with a young London street urchin (Andrew Ray) who makes an unlikely connection with Queen Victoria (Irene Dunne), who has been in grief-stricken seclusion since the death of her husband. Also featuring Alec Guinness as Disraeli, Finlay Currie, Beatrice Campbell, Anthony Steel, and Wilfred Hyde-White. This is a handsomely decorated film, with good performances by all involved. I was particularly taken with Guinness, who gets a lengthy monologue, and character-actor stalwart Currie, amusing as the Scotsman John Brown. 

LOL. That shot of Irene in the poster must be from another movie!

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On 2/2/2019 at 7:56 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I LOVE THIS MOVIE!!!!!!

JANE COWL- Who I want to say did more writing than acting- Is really marvelous in one of her rare screen appearances. I think this is also one of Stanwycks finest performances. OLIVE FILMS Released the DVD, but since a Paramount film, I doubt we will be seeing it anytime soon on TCM.

YEP. I've yet to see this on TCM. :( One of the few Babs films left I havent seen. :(

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3 hours ago, TomJH said:

 

Hubba.

In an interview with Julie Newmar the actress responded to the statement that the above video is on You Tube.

That is 18 years old. They painted my body gold. They found a technique where the poor model didn't die. I was wearing a tummy covering bikini as it were. This was so long ago that belly buttons were not allowed on screen. I was covered in gold, doing a backward arch and they yelled, "Stop!" They come running in with scotch tape and put it over my belly button.

 

 Just in case anyone was wondering about Shirley Eaton in "Goldfinger".  Didn't know there was a rumor she died from being painted in gold - she didn't.

https://www.messynessychic.com/2013/11/25/how-they-painted-bonds-golden-girl/

 

bondgold1.jpg

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Webmaster do something about the message at the bottom that says wait 27 (give or take a few) seconds before submitting.  I did and nothing happened after a few attempts.  Appears it did posted - several times.

 

Edited by hamradio
Message about delayed posting
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Fourteen Hours (1951)  -  7/10

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Suspense drama directed by Henry Hathaway that's the archetypal "man on a ledge" movie. Richard Basehart is the suicidal person, while Paul Douglas co-stars as a traffic cop who ends up being the chief negotiator trying to get Basehart down. The film is more than a little overly familiar by now, as just about every aspect has been reused in countless films and TV shows with the same subject matter. The chief joy in this movie now is the tremendous supporting cast of faces that would become familiar over the next decade: Agnes Moorehead, Robert Keith, Howard Da Silva, Barbara Bel Geddes, Jeff Corey, Leif Erickson, John Randolph, Martin Gabel, Frank Faylen, Harvey Lembeck, Brad Dexter, Debra Paget, Brian Keith, Ossie Davis, and several notables make their debuts: Grace Kelly, Jeffrey Hunter, John Cassavetes, Richard Beymer, Joyce Van Patten, and Janice Rule. Basehart's performance is effective, made more poignant when one learns that his wife died of a brain tumor during filming. This movie marked Barbara Bel Geddes last film appearance until Vertigo 7 years later. 

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Green Grow the Rushes (1951)  -  6/10

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Mild British comedy about government bureaucrats trying to stop brandy smuggling in a southern coastal town. Chief smugglers Roger Livesey and Richard Burton try to figure out ways to get their precious cargo ashore, with help from posh new girl in town Honor Blackman. Also featuring Frederick Lester, John Salew, Colin Gordon, Cyril Smith, Eliot Makeham, Bryan Forbes, Harcourt Williams, and Geoffrey Keen. This is a pleasant enough time-waster, but it ain't no Whisky Galore.

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I'll Never Forget You aka The House in the Square (1951)  -  7/10

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Romantic fantasy, based on Berkeley Square, with Tyrone Power as an American nuclear physicist working in England. He gets thrown back in time to the 18th century where he amazes and disturbs the locals with his prescient knowledge, while also falling in love with Ann Blyth. Also featuring Michael Rennie, Dennis Price, Beatrice Campbell, Kathleen Byron, Raymond Huntley, Felix Aylmer, and Irene Browne. I've seen the earlier adaptation starring Leslie Howard, so much of the material was familiar. This one adds some new details, like the very-1950's atomic angle, as well as an aesthetic choice to film the beginning and ending modern sections in B&W, while the bulk of the film set in the 1700's is in Technicolor. I enjoyed this, and Blyth was perhaps lovelier here than in anything else that I've seen her in. That poster above, though, is one of the worst that I've ever seen.

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The Magic Box (1951)  -  7/10

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British biopic on William Friese-Greene (Robert Donat), an inventor who designed some of the earliest movie camera and film developments. His life is a series of ups & downs, experienced alongside his two wives, Helena (Maria Schell) and Edith (Margaret Johnston). The film was produced by Ronald Neame and directed by John Boulting as part of the patriotic Festival of Britain. As such, there are dozens of cameos from famed performers, including but not limited to: Richard Attenborough, Glynis Johns, Margaret Rutherford, Michael Redgrave, Eric Portman, Sybil Thorndike, Dennis Price, Leo Genn, Mervyn Johns, Ernest Thesiger, Stanley Holloway, Peter Ustinov, and Laurence Olivier. The Technicolor cinematography by Jack Cardiff is very nice, and the production design is top notch. The film's structure is unusual as well, as the first half of the film flashes back to the last half of Friese-Greene's life, while the second half of the film flashes back to the first half of his life. I was also impressed by the performances from all three leads.

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On the Riviera (1951)  -  5/10

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Technicolor musical comedy starring Danny Kaye in dual roles: one is an American entertainer in Paris, while the other is a celebrated French aviator. Naturally the two start being mistaken for each other, and "hilarity" ensues. Also starring Gene Tierney, Corinne Calvet, Marcel Dalio, Jean Murat, and Sig Ruman. I watched this for Tierney, and she looks nice, but Calvet gets more screen time. Laura fans may recognize the Tierney portrait showing up in this.

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4 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

On the Riviera (1951)  -  5/10

220px-On_the_Riviera_1951.jpg

Technicolor musical comedy starring Danny Kaye in dual roles: one is an American entertainer in Paris, while the other is a celebrated French aviator. Naturally the two start being mistaken for each other, and "hilarity" ensues. Also starring Gene Tierney, Corinne Calvet, Marcel Dalio, Jean Murat, and Sig Ruman. I watched this for Tierney, and she looks nice, but Calvet gets more screen time. Laura fans may recognize the Tierney portrait showing up in this.

And in colour, too.

Props003.2.jpg

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Outcast of the Islands (1951)  -  6/10

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British drama based on a book by Joseph Conrad. Trevor Howard stars as middle manager in a Far East shipping company. When he's found to have been embezzling, he's virtually exiled and runs of with his old friend, ship captain Ralph Richardson. Ralph takes him to a remote island paradise and instructs Trevor to learn the ways of their trading business with local overseer Robert Morley. However, Howard slowly succumbs to his worst impulses in the never-ending heat and boredom of island life. Also featuring Wendy Hiller, George Coulouris, Wilfred Hyde-White, Marne Maitland, and Kerima.

I really wanted to like this one more than I did. The direction from Carol Reed is good, although things drag in a few places. The cinematography is very good; one of the camera operators was Freddie Francis. Guy Hamilton also worked as the assistant director. My chief problem with the film was the Howard character. I haven't read the source novel, and perhaps it provided more of the inner voice of the character, but as he stands in the film, he's completely unlikable, and not in a compelling or entertaining way. He's just a boring, self-centered jerk. The natives are presented in a less-than-flattering light as well, which is exacerbated by having one of them be George Coulouris in dark body paint. I've also never been fond of Robert Morley. He's an irritating ham and he's unpleasant to even look at. That's terrible to say, I suppose, but in a visual medium, it's a valid point. His real-life daughter played his on-screen daughter here, and she's just as annoying. Oh well...

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11 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Wow you apply gold leaf.... 

Yup. 23k, 10k, Japanese, German, French made...but my preference is Italian gold. Silver leaf is just really thin aluminum. Silver would tarnish. I should leaf myself for Halloween, haha.

 

8 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

I've also never been fond of Robert Morley. He's an irritating ham and he's unpleasant to even look at. That's terrible to say, I suppose

No it isn't, I feel exactly the same way. "Irritating ham" says it perfectly. It's as if he was trying to channel Charles Laughton, missing the impish charm element.

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I am catching up on all the popular movies missed in the 80's so I figured it was time to finally see Disney's THE LITTLE MERMAID.

I was first really disappointed in the animation & almost turned it off. With such a great setting to draw, paint & animate as the SEA with all it's colorful creatures, the drawings were very weak in my opinion. The charactors were drawn quite flat-common for Disney, but the settings should have been as deep & lush as BAMBI's. Especially for the movement of the sea-which should have actually "waved" instead of just vaseline lens blurring.

But I stuck with it, planning on ff through the typically lame Disney songs. Surprise! The songs were great, every one of them were enjoyable once past the syrupy "Part of Your World" Ariel song. The songs perfectly illustrated the charactors feelings & situations, were well composed & orchestrated, lively and enjoyable.

Standouts- obviously the Calypso music by the crab with big groups of colorful fish playing "instruments" in a Busby Berkeley style number. I could just imagine a 5-8 year old mesmerized watching that unfold on the big screen. 

The "chef" scene is also an entertaining stand out, with a frenetic French chef chasing around the teeny crab in his kitchen. The chef was animated very broadly and fun with riotous lyrics and actually gory images of chopping off fish heads, etc. It went on just a tad too long, but glad it was in there.

But oh the villain. The "sea witch" octopus Ursula is just the strongest villain to come out of a Disney film in a long time. She was animated really well- her fat legs undulating menacingly like snakes and they managed to give her a big far rear end to bounce around. When she got angry her face was terrifying and when she got "power" her size was terrifying. I especially liked her underhanded trick to ensure winning the bargain with Ariel, illustrating how bullies "cheat".

Ursula was expertly voiced by Pat Carroll, whose name I spotted on the opening credits. Yes, THAT Pat Carroll we know from TV sitcoms & game shows (& Broadway) Once Ursula was on the screen, there was no mistaking that was the character super talent Carroll voiced with perfect inflection & incredible nuance. All I can say is WOW.

The story is just as I remembered the fairy tale with a few extra interesting elements like Ariel's collection of items collected from shipwrecks. It helped illustrate Ariel's fascination with the dry world. I feared for the charactors a few times, like when Ariel lost her tail for legs and when the Prince rescued his sheepdog. If I can care about a cartoon charactor's welfare, it's a successful cartoon. But too bad a visual disappointment, artistically.

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10 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

 I've also never been fond of Robert Morley. He's an irritating ham and he's unpleasant to even look at.

 

2 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

 "Irritating ham" says it perfectly. It's as if he was trying to channel Charles Laughton, missing the impish charm element.

While I can understand why some would call Robert Morley a ham because, well, he was one, I must say that I find Morley's screen ham to often be rich and succulent. I appreciate the British stage tradition behind his film performances and have often enjoyed his over the top screen indulgences, even if he's playing a pompous arse.

Morley was very good at playing eccentrics in some comedies. I enjoy watching his work in Huston's Beat the Devil, for example.

But I suppose that the first Morley performance that always comes to mind for me was a very contrasting portrayal to his hammy ones, his gentle, touching work as King Louis XVI in Marie Antoinette. In playing a simple minded monarch laughed at by members of the French court, he brought decency and courage to the role that made the characterization a memorable one.

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Payment on Demand (1951)  -  6/10

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Marital melodrama with Bette Davis and Barry Sullivan as a wealthy couple with two nearly grown daughters. One night Sullivan announces that he wants a divorce, and the film flashes back to show why. Also featuring Jane Cowl, Kent Taylor, Betty Lynn, John Sutton, Frances Dee, Peggie Castle, Otto Kruger, Richard Anderson, and Natalie Schafer. Davis had begun to slip into caricature at this point, and whether or not this is a problem depends on the viewer. I'm fine with it in some things, but she became distracting in this film. I'm also not fond of Sullivan, so that didn't help things. This was the final film of Jane Cowl, who died 8 months before the movie was released.

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20 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Payment on Demand (1951)  -  6/10

180px-Payment_on_demand_film_poste.jpg

Marital melodrama with Bette Davis and Barry Sullivan as a wealthy couple with two nearly grown daughters. One night Sullivan announces that he wants a divorce, and the film flashes back to show why. Also featuring Jane Cowl, Kent Taylor, Betty Lynn, John Sutton, Frances Dee, Peggie Castle, Otto Kruger, Richard Anderson, and Natalie Schafer. Davis had begun to slip into caricature at this point, and whether or not this is a problem depends on the viewer. I'm fine with it in some things, but she became distracting in this film. I'm also not fond of Sullivan, so that didn't help things. This was the final film of Jane Cowl, who died 8 months before the movie was released.

I hadn't heard of Barry Sullivan until a few months ago when I saw him for the first time in Tension.  I really enjoy his presence in the films of his that I've seen.  Ever since I saw Sullivan in Tension, he's been in everything I've watched.  I thought he was great with Barbara Stanwyck in Jeopardy even though he spent most of the time sitting on the beach.  I think I have Payment on Demand recorded.  I feel like I've seen this before, but I don't remember Sullivan.  I'll have to watch this again.

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Penny Points to Paradise (1951)  -  4/10

penny_points_to_paradise.jpg

Dismal British comedy that marked a cinematic venture from the members of The Goon Show, a very popular-in-the-UK radio show. Harry Seacombe and Spike Milligan star as Harry and Spike, two pals headed to the coast for a holiday. Harry has recently won a large amount of cash, and when others learn of it, they set out to get "their share". Also featuring Vicky Page, Paddie O'Neil, Alfred Marks, Bill Kerr, and Peter Sellers. This marked Sellers' film debut, with him appearing in two roles: a doddering old man, and a fast-talking huckster. He was only 25 at the time of filming, and yet is completely convincing as the old man. Most of the film's manic comedy fell flat for me, unfortunately, with a lot of nods to silent film slapstick and vaudeville-style gags.

tumblr_n4598bc6s91qmemvwo1_400.jpg  15616-14706-1.jpg

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Payment on Demand (1951)  -  6/10

180px-Payment_on_demand_film_poste.jpg

Marital melodrama with Bette Davis and Barry Sullivan as a wealthy couple with two nearly grown daughters. One night Sullivan announces that he wants a divorce, and the film flashes back to show why. Also featuring Jane Cowl, Kent Taylor, Betty Lynn, John Sutton, Frances Dee, Peggie Castle, Otto Kruger, Richard Anderson, and Natalie Schafer. Davis had begun to slip into caricature at this point, and whether or not this is a problem depends on the viewer. I'm fine with it in some things, but she became distracting in this film. I'm also not fond of Sullivan, so that didn't help things. This was the final film of Jane Cowl, who died 8 months before the movie was released.

VERY misleading poster of Bette. She does NOT look like that in the film! Very matronly.

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Davis had begun to slip into caricature at this point,

You're about a year away from The Star, with the "only in Hollywood" romantic pairing of her and Sterling Hayden. :lol:

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Roadblock (1951)  -  7/10

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Passable noir made memorable by the lead performance from Charles McGraw. He plays a tough-guy insurance company investigator who gets caught up with Joan Dixon, a woman who likes nice things and guys who can buy them for her. This drives McGraw to take some drastic actions, which, since this is noir, don't end well for anyone. Also featuring Louis Jean Heydt, Milburn Stone, Joseph Crehan, Peter Brocco, and Lowell Gilmore. This is definitely on the B-movie side of things, but there's some decent B&W cinematography from Nicholas Musaraca. 

P.S. I'm also of the opinion that no movie with scenes shot in the L.A. River can be all bad.

 

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SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE (2018) *Score: 6.75/10* 

Starring: Shameik Moore, Hailee Steinfeld, Liev Schrieber, Kathryn Hahn, Lily Tomlin, Nicolas Cage, Mahershala Ali, Jake Johnson, Zoe Kravitz, Brian Tyree Henry, Luna Lauren Velez, John Mulaney, Kimiko Glenn. 

Marvel & Sony collaboration that focused on student Miles Morales, an intelligent New Yorker, who, under interesting circumstances, wakes up to find that he has changed somehow (maybe for the better). Notorious Spider-Man villain, The Kingpin, is working with scientists to create a device that can open up portals to different dimensions in an attempt to restore what was once lost. Opening the portals allows for other Spider-People to be pulled from their respective dimensions, and Miles and them all have to figure out how to stop the Kingpin and get back to their homes safely. 

I was very impressed with this one. It was one of the better Marvel movies I've seen, to be honest. The artwork was done in a comic-book style, complete with thought bubbles and sound-effects abundantly displayed on screen. The animators deserve accolades for their work on this film; the color scheme and animation style worked very well together, and the fight scenes were wonderful to watch. I would recommend giving this one a try. I enjoyed it, without knowing too much about the Spider-Man universe in the first place. 

Image result for spider man into the spider verse

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