Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
speedracer5

I Just Watched...

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Of Antonioni's works, I liked L'Avventura (1960), Il Grido (1957), La Notte (1961), L'Eclisse (1962), and Zabriskie Point (1970) more than Blow-Up, although I didn't hate that last film, either. The only one I liked less was The Passenger (1975), but that also has some good aspects to it, IMO. I want to see Red Desert (1964).

I remember something Pauline Kael once said about one of Antonioni's films (forget which one): "Some like it cold". Yup. I find all his movies ice-cold, they don't engage me at all. Except for - guess I'm the opposite of you when it comes to this particular director -  Blowup.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, kingrat said:

I haven't seen The Passenger

The Passenger was announced with much fanfare, a teaming of arthouse favorite Antonioni and box-office heavyweight Jack Nicholson. Unfortunately, like many of the films Nicholson made in order to work with his idols (The Last TycoonThe ShiningThe Missouri Breaks), the star came away from the film disappointed. He plays a reporter who travels to the Sahara to interview a gunrunner, only to find the man has died. Nicholson sees a resemblance, so he decides to assume the dead man's identity, because... Maria Schneider is along for the ride, too. I should see the film again, as I wasn't as arthouse friendly as I am now, but I recall the film being unfocused, meandering and ultimately pointless. However, the craftsmanship on display is exemplary, and there's a justly praised sequence near the end that's unforgettable, from a technical standpoint.

The-Passenger.jpg?resize=853,480

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, kingrat said:

For Lorna and others wondering about Antonioni films: I haven't seen The Passenger...

I prefer the Iggy Pop song.

Actually, I don't mean to sound flippant. I appreciate your in-depth write-up about the films of Antonioni, and am in fact motivated to try seeing some of them again. That's  one of the nice things about this TCM site, we can exchange opinions we don't always agree with, and sometimes even have our minds opened a little  (sorry for the cliches, but it's true.)

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lisbon (1956)  -  6/10

220px-Lisbon_1956_film_poster.jpg

International crime and intrigue with Ray Milland (who also produced and directed) as an American smuggler based out of the title locale. He gets hired by criminal kingpin Claude Rains to rescue a wealthy man trapped behind the Iron Curtain. However, the rich man's wife (Maureen O'Hara) would rather see her hubby dead so that she can inherit his wealth, so she tries to convince Milland to help make that happen. Also featuring Yvonne Furneaux as Rains' secretary that catches Milland's interest, Francis Lederer as another of Rains' employees who likes Furneaux and thus does not like Milland, and Jay Novello as the local police detective. Said to be the first Hollywood movie to film on location entirely in Portugal, there are a lot of nice scenic shots and local flavor. It was also interesting to see O'Hara playing a villainous role.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

I agree, he's very sexy in Blowup. Not just the way he looks (which is hot), but also his  persona in the film, his seeming coolness, his insouciance.

In "Blow-Up", David Hemminngs was/is a fascinating screen presence.

Unfortunately, the ensuing years were not kind to him.

In fact, late David Hemmings in no way resembles early David Hemmings.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kingrat said:

For Lorna and others wondering about Antonioni films: I haven't seen The Passenger, but I've seen Le Amiche and Red Desert in addition to the other films Lawrence mentions. Here's a thumbnail sketch of what you might find if you explore more Antonioni films, and I'll put these in chronological order.

Le Amiche (The Girlfriends or The Women Friends): A film about several women and their boyfriends. Sex and the City without as much sex and with depression and anomie instead of snappy girl talk. There's a scene at the beach with complicated shots that show the relationships between the various characters, and this alone demonstrates how gifted a director Antonioni can be. Contemporary critics of the next few films saw the alienation in Antonioni's films as a marker of deep problems in society. Today we might wonder if the problem wasn't more in Antonioni's psyche; surely only a deeply depressed man would have made this group of films?

Il Grido (The Outcry): Rain and depression and alienation in the Po Valley of northern Italy. One of my favorite Antonioni films. Steve Cochran plays an Italian workman who takes his daughter and wanders from place to place, woman to woman. Betsy Blair from Marty plays one of the women; she was Antonioni's girlfriend for a time.

L'Avventura: Monica Vitti was Anotnioni's girlfriend for a much longer time, and she is the muse of the next four films. Get ready for another unresolved mystery. In an unintended parallel with Psycho, which is exactly contemporaneous, L'Avventura begins with a woman (Lea Massari, giving the best performance in any Antonioni film) with a complicated life who suddenly disappears from the film. Then her lover (Massimo Girotti) and her best friend (Monica Vitti) try to find her or find out what happened to her. How long will she continue to matter to them? Beautifully filmed. I'd like to see this again to see if I like it as much now as when I saw it in college.

La Notte: Even with Jeanne Moreau, Marcello Mastroianni, and Monica Vitti, this isn't one of my favorites, though some like it a great deal. The stars and the director all have their moments, but the unhappy marriage and pointless lives of the rich and general sense of alienation are all too predictable and "on the nose" for my taste.

L'Eclisse: A film where the sum of the parts is much greater than the whole. The plot, such as it is: Monica Vitti ends a relationship with one man, meets Alain Delon, begins a relationship with him (well, all right!), and then . . . . The ending is famous, with a seven minutes of images with no people. The opening scene of the breakup is just as great, with every camera set-up and camera movement making us feel how the relationship is fracturing. Scenes at the stock market are exciting, and there's a memorable moment where Monica Vitti follows a man who's lost all his money, as she wonders how this must feel for him. On the other hand, there's a dull scene at an airport and an utterly embarrassing scene where Monica visits friends who have come back from Africa, so she puts on blackface and prances around.

Red Desert: Antonioni's first color film. Interesting shots around industrial areas. Monica Vitti plays a depressed woman who has a husband and a young son. She begins an affair with Richard Harris (such a comedown from Alain Delon), and there's not much of a plot.

Red Desert was his first color film, Blow-Up was his first film in English (arthouse smash hit), and Zabriskie Point was his first film shot in the United States. Hugely anticipated because of Blow-Up, Zabriskie Point is quite attractive to look at. This was Antonioni's film about student radicals (hot-button, very chic topic at the time), and, unintentionally, the moronic script and the utterly untalented nonprofessionals who play the romantic leads capture the ineptitude of the student radical movement pretty accurately.

Beautifully stated, in the art of non-storytelling and mastery of visual style, Antonioni was peerless.

My favorite of so many favorites is "Eclipse". 

Monica Vitti and Alain Delon made "alientation" thrilling.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

I remember something Pauline Kael once said about one of Antonioni's films (forget which one): "Some like it cold". Yup. I find all his movies ice-cold, they don't engage me at all. Except for - guess I'm the opposite of you when it comes to this particular director -  Blowup.

Pauline Kael made that famous anti-Antonioni statement about the absolutely great film, "Eclipse". 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Il Grido (1957), La Notte (1961)

Aside from Blow Up These are the the two I've liked, haven't seen his others yet 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man in the Vault (1956)  -  5/10

220px-ManInTheVault1956Poster.jpg

Substandard crime drama from John Wayne's Batjac production company. William Campbell stars as a locksmith who is forced by sleazy gangster Berry Kroeger into using his skills to rob a safety deposit box in a bank. Also featuring Karen Sharpe, Anita Ekberg, Paul Fix, James Seay, Robert Keys, Mike Mazurki, John Mitchum, and Pedro Gonzalez Gonzalez. Campbell's character name is "Tommy Dancer" and I frequently thought people were name-dropping Elton John tunes. While there's not enough Ekberg and Mazurki, there are several scenes shot at Art Linkletter's La Cienega Lanes bowling alley.

la-cienega-bowlng-1956-THE-MAN-IN-THE-VA

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Man in the Vault, William Campbell looks like Tony Curtis having a bad hair day.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, rayban said:

In "Blow-Up", David Hemminngs was/is a fascinating screen presence.

Unfortunately, the ensuing years were not kind to him.

In fact, late David Hemmings in no way resembles early David Hemmings.

 

rayban, I don't understand why you posted a "confused" emoji after my comments about Antonioni. Even if you disagreed with me, there was nothing confusing about my post.

...I agree, Hemmings didn't age well.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, rayban said:

Pauline Kael made that famous anti-Antonioni statement about the absolutely great film, "Eclipse". 

I hated Eclipse.

But, as I said to kingrat earlier, a few posts back, maybe I should give it and Antonioni another shot.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, rayban said:

In "Blow-Up", David Hemminngs was/is a fascinating screen presence.

Unfortunately, the ensuing years were not kind to him.

In fact, late David Hemmings in no way resembles early David Hemmings.

I've seen many English actors on stage in their youth, then years later on film/tv or on stage. They don't all age very well. Two whom I thought were rather adorable in youth suddenly seemed to get rather wrinkly -- Iain Glen and Bill Nighy.

This is how I first saw them:

henryV2.jpg

Iain Glen as Henry V (1995)

man-luck4.jpg

Iain Glen in The Man Who Had all the Luck (1990)

bb01d15d6b01e848e9c1042a8d492f8f.jpg

Bill Nighy as Edgar in King Lear (1986; Anthony Hopkins was King Lear)

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hemmings still looks very good in 1978's excellent war story, "Power Play' (opposite Peter O'Toole); but in 1979's nifty Australian vampire flick 'Thirst', he looks terrible. Something must have happened that year, he ballooned up in weight and girth.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recall seeing Mean Machine, the soccer-twist remake of The Longest Yard, in 2001, and having no idea that the warden was David Hemmings until the end credits.

02431803.JPG

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once more unto the breach! 

Fer-de-Lance (1974)  -  4/10

Fer+de+lance+-+terreur+sous+la+mer+-+dea

Snakes on a submarine! After a crewman (Frank Bonner, aka Herb Tarlek from WKRP in Cincinnati) buys a basket of snakes (?!?) while on shore leave in South America, he unwittingly sets them loose on his submarine, which is on a joint military and civilian research mission. The chaos the snakes create causes the sub to crash to the ocean floor, and the surviving crew must figure out how to reach the surface before their air runs out or a snake bites them. Starring Mr. David Janssen, Hope Lange, Ivan Dixon, Ben Piazza, Jason Evers, and Robert Ito. I was struck by a heavy feeling of lethargy shortly after the film began, and it became a herculean effort to remain conscious, It was as if Morpheus himself were whispering eldritch incantations into my ear, beckoning me into the land of dreams and nightmares. Luckily I remained awake and aware enough to finish this too-dark, too-slow dud.

 

Hurricane (1974)  -  4/10

05-Hurricane-Mother-from-Arrested-Develo

Natural disaster, TV-Movie style, with Larry Hagman and Jessica Walter as a couple trapped in a boat out to sea as the big storm hits; Barry Sullivan as an old coot who refuses to evacuate his home and leave his dogs; Frank Sutton as a loudmouth who also refuses to leave but only so he can party; Will Geer and Michael Learned as meteorologists tracking the storm; and Martin Milner, Lonny Chapman and Barry Livingston as an aircrew surveying the storm from above. Also with Patrick Duffy, Jack Colvin, and Jerry Hardin. This was even worse than the previous film, like an audio-visual tranquilizer dart dosed for an elephant. It was only through frequent, repeated injections of meth-amphetamines directly into the ocular orbits that I was able to remain cognizant of my surroundings. 

 

Killdozer (1974)  -  6/10

Killdozer-1974-movie-Jerry-London-8.jpg

Now this was more like it: a meteor crashes to the Earth, coming to rest on a small island off the African coast. Later an American oil company crew arrives on the island to prep the site for future oil exploration. The crewmen must fight for survival after their bulldozer comes into contact with the meteor, resulting in a transference of some sort of alien, energy-based intelligence into the machine, which promptly goes on a killing spree. Starring Clint Walker, Carl Betz, James Wainwright, Neville Brand, James A. Watson Jr., and Robert Urich. This was based on a  novella by Theodore Sturgeon, and he also co-wrote the script, so it's slightly better than the ludicrous set-up implies. It's still very silly, but everyone plays it straight, and as far as killer motorized equipment movies go, this one is okay.

 

Killer Bees (1974)  -  4/10

hqdefault.jpg

The title says it all. Kate Jackson insists that boyfriend Edward Arnold take her to his family's vineyard estate in California wine country. She learns why he was hesitant once they arrive: the family's vast fortune has been made possible thanks to the family matriarch (Gloria Swanson) and her preternatural control of bees. Also featuring Craig Stevens, Roger Davis, Don McGovern, Liam Dunn, John S. Ragin, and John Getz. This is as terrible as the rest of the killer bee movies, although Swanson is entertaining, sporting Princess Leia hair and a German accent. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Hemmings still looks very good in 1978's excellent war story, "Power Play' (opposite Peter O'Toole); but in 1979's nifty Australian vampire flick 'Thirst', he looks terrible. Something must have happened that year, he ballooned up in weight and girth.

He is also unrecognizable in the EXCELLENT 1974 Bomb on a cruise ship thriller JUGGERNAUT.

In fact, I totally didn’t realize it was him until I went to ImDB and read up on the movie after I saw it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

H'mmm, well then, this is something I do not understand. 'Juggernaut' was 1974; his face should still have been fine unless he was on drugs. When I view him in 'Islands in the Stream' (1977) and 'Power Play' (1978, lead actor) he still looks good to me. Only in '79 does he suddenly appear almost as a whole other person due to a weight gain of probably 100 lbs,

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The talk about how Hemmings didn't age well makes one think of other actors/actresses of whom the same could be said.

Anita Ekberg is a classic illustration of it. A stunning voluptuous beauty during the late '50s and early '60s, she ballooned in weight in her later years. In the midst of that large weight gain, though, were the changes to her face. Much like Anita Page in her final years, she almost looked like she could have been wearing a rubber mask.

Anita_Ekburg-1.jpg?fit=800,470&ssl=1

the_evolution_of_anita_ekberg_640_07.jpg

As far as male actors are concerned, Ray Milland slowly evolved from a dashing, handsome leading man during the late '30s and the war years to, eventually, a bald man with saggy facial features. I believe that Milland blamed DeMille for the hair loss, claiming it stemmed from when he had to get a perm for one of the director's films. Still, there's a lot more happening to his appearance change than just a perm.

Ray-Milland.jpg

actor-ray-milland-exclusive-sighting-on-

I don't know if either of these performers had alcohol or drug issues (I've never heard that either did). I assume Anita liked her food, which clearly didn't help. Still, sometimes I guess it's just one's genetic lot in life. Ekberg and Milland were both fortunate to have been so very good looking when they were young. You wouldn't have known that, though, if you only saw them in their later years.

By the way, Ekberg had been under consideration as being the first of the "Bond girls" in Dr. No, losing the role to Ursula Andress. Producer Cubby Broccoli must have still had Anita on his mind, though (plus a promotion of another film of his), since she did make an appearance, sort of, in From Russia With Love.

ekberg_frwl.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer to remember David Hemmings as "golden" in "Blow-Up", (1966), of course, and "The Best House in London" (1969).

That something drastic happened to him in his later years cannot be denied.

He did write an autobiography, I believe.

Today, there are so many procedures that cause actors and actresses to look years younger than they actually are.

But they can't quite re-capture that long-gone beauty and youth.

However, they do try.

8933754242490526555.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Killer Bees (1974)  -  4/10

Gloria Swanson meets Ben.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IN RE: DAVID HEMMINGS

(I feel kind of guilty saying this, but pretty much the entirety of my genetic make-up is traced to England and (especially) Scotland, so here goes)-

The British are deservedly  known for a great deal of good things- a stalwart nature, gentility, a knack for high comedy, the Parliamentary System of Government, the best that Literature has to offer- but two things they are not known for are their exquisite cuisine or ability to age "well."

I think it has something to do with not a lot of vegetables or sun.

I also blame all the flocked wallpaper because looking at it all day everywhere I went would age me.

 

*****not to say that there aren't exceptions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

IN RE: DAVID HEMMINGS

(I feel kind of guilty saying this, but pretty much the entirety of my genetic make-up is traced to England and (especially) Scotland, so here goes)-

The British are deservedly  known for a great deal of good things- a stalwart nature, gentility, a knack for high comedy, the Parliamentary System of Government, the best that Literature has to offer- but two things they are not known for are their exquisite cuisine or ability to age "well."

I think it has something to do with not a lot of vegetables or sun.

I also blame all the flocked wallpaper because looking at it all day everywhere I went would age me.

 

*****not to say that there aren't exceptions.

As a frequent visitor to England (three times a year), I'm happy to assure you that both the cuisine and the weather have improved immeasurably!

On the question of aging, I worked with Eileen Atkins once. She told me one of the reasons she (and many of the older Brit ladies) can get jobs, is that they don't have their faces lifted, like many of  the American actresses of a certain age do. Maybe that's true for the men as well.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
×
×
  • Create New...