Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
speedracer5

I Just Watched...

Recommended Posts

1 minute ago, TomJH said:

Congratulations, Lawrence.

However, I suspect there's a second Flynn film you've yet to see - Hello God (1951). And best of luck with that one.

Yeah, I didn't even bother putting that one on my list of his films. But who knows, perhaps some day it will show up somewhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Yeah, I didn't even bother putting that one on my list of his films. But who knows, perhaps some day it will show up somewhere.

Apparently there is a discovered version, with one reel missing.

The other illusive Flynn material is the 34 minutes or so of existing material (sans sound) that was shot of William Tell, the aborted Flynn project that left him broke. Plus, there were a handful of TV projects he did towards the end.

For Errol Flynn Theatre he appeared in six half hour shows, one titled The 1000th Night of Don Juan in which he played a middle aged Don. It was briefly on You Tube before yanked off for copy right reasons.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

(This one was a delayed posting after I had a four-hour power outage due to thunderstorms. All that precious movie-watchin' time lost!)

That's 2 movies! I won't supply a link, as you don't click on them anyway, nor do I want to promote Amazon. They do fine all by themselves. But I found a portable DVD player with rechargeable battery.

"Pyle 15-Inch Portable DVD Player, Swivel Angle Adjustable Display Screen, USB/SD Card Memory Readers, and Built-in Rechargeable Battery with Remote Control. (PDV156BK)"

Also, how do some people post images so frequently without running out of space from the forum? I suspect you have a trick up your sleeve.

No, I am not trying to be funny. I notice you watch a lot of films. These products are still very common.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Michael Rennie said:

Also, how do some people post images so frequently without running out of space from the forum? I suspect you have a trick up your sleeve.

No, I am not trying to be funny. I notice you watch a lot of films. These products are still very common.

I "hotlink" the pictures I use. Find the image you want online, right-click and choose "open in new tab", then CTRL+C to copy the URL address. CTRL+V to paste the URL into the message box, where it will appear as the image like so:

 456681984_thethirdman.thumb.jpg.9ebf689a

The chief drawback to using this method is that the image disappears if the original host website pulls it.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jeanne Eagels (1957)  -  6/10

jeanne-eagles.jpg

Exploitation melodrama masquerading as biopic, with Kim Novak as the famous stage and screen actress. The film charts her beginnings as a dancer in a carnival run by Jeff Chandler, to her eventual conquest of the Broadway stage, with the assistance of imperious acting coach Agnes Moorehead. Eagels develops a drug and alcohol problem along the way. Also featuring Charles Drake, Joe De Santis, Larry Gates, Virginia Grey, Murray Hamilton, Joe Turkel, and Gene Lockhart in his final film role. Frank Borzage also cameos as himself. Like most Hollywood biopics, this is more fiction than fact. The weight of the story lies on Novak, who's not the kind of actress to do this part justice, although she tries. She also shows off a lot of skin, so fans of her pulchritude will enjoy that, at least. There are a few sensationalist scenes that push things towards out-right camp, but not enough to make this a must-see.

jeanne-eagels-kim-novak-1957_a-G-9337100

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Time Travelers (1976)  -  5/10

TimeTravelersTV.jpg

Imaginatively titled science fiction TV-movie featuring Sam Groom as a 20th century doctor who agrees to travel back 100 years in time in order to try and find a cure for a mysterious illness. He's accompanied by veteran time traveler Tom Hallick who tries to teach him the ins and outs of responsible time traveling. They run into trouble when they realize that their time travel machine has sent them to Chicago on the eve of the Great Fire, so they have to work against the clock (HA!). Also featuring Richard Basehart, Trish Stewart, Francine York, Booth Colman, and Walter Brooke. This was a failed pilot from producer Irwin Allen (he even reused sets decorations from Time Tunnel), and it also features a story credit for Rod Serling. A lot of stock footage is lifted (and tinted) from In Old Chicago (1938).

Lawrence, this might be of interest to soap opera fans from the 60s and 70s. Sam Groom played Dr. Russ Matthews on Another World back in the 1960s; none of the replacements were anywhere near as good. Sam Groom was Canadian, left Another World to star in a medical show for Canadian TV, and was in the movie The Baby Maker in the early 80s. Tom Hallick (Brad, the psychiatrist) and Trish Stewart (Chris Brooks) were original cast members of The Young and the Restless.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Murder on Flight 502 (1975)  -  6/10

All-star TV-movie answer to the Airport films. An airport security chief (George Maharis) receives an anonymous letter informing him of a series of murders about to be committed on a transatlantic flight. It's up to flight captain Robert Stack to try and stop the killings before they happen. Also featuring Hugh O'Brian, Farrah Fawcett, Walter Pidgeon, Molly Picon, Dane Clark, Laraine Day, Ralph Bellamy, Theodore Bikel, Danny Bonaduce, Brooke Adams, Fernando Lamas, Polly Bergen, Rosemarie Stack, Elizabeth Stack, Steve Franken, and Sonny Bono. This is cheesy and often laughable, but the old pros are worth seeing, with Pidgeon and Picon having a fun time. It's hard trying to take Stack seriously in an airplane movie after Airplane.

Or even Sonny Bono, after playing the bomber in Airplane II: the Sequel.   :D

20 hours ago, kingrat said:

Exactly. Part of the fun of re-reading or re-watching a Christie story is that now you appreciate exactly how and where the misdirection occurs.

Safe rule of thumb for most Christie stories:
If one of the suspects ALMOST dies or is attacked as the murderer's next victim for knowing too much, but recovers, thus seemingly taking themselves out of the running....they did it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/1/2019 at 3:34 PM, CaveGirl said:

I love Jackie Cooper too, Janet. And I also love Jackie Coogan but for some reason one never seems to be able to see all the films Jackie made when he was a giant child star, like "Tom Sawyer" and "Peck's Bad Boy" and so on.

I wonder why?

Just wondered if you like both Jackies also?

Enjoyed your post!

I don't have a kid of my own, but I do enjoy child actors. Jackie Cooper hated Wallace Beery's guts, which I find a little disturbing since they acted so well together. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Janet0312 said:

I don't have a kid of my own, but I do enjoy child actors. Jackie Cooper hated Wallace Beery's guts, which I find a little disturbing since they acted so well together. 

From what I've read, pretty much everybody who worked with Wallace Beery hated his guts.

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

From what I've read, pretty much everybody who worked with Wallace Beery hated his guts.

He was a swine.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

From what I've read, pretty much everybody who worked with Wallace Beery hated his guts.

Darryl Hickman was the only child actor who had some nice things to say about Beery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Darryl Hickman was the only child actor who had some nice things to say about Beery.

I don't think Ted Healy was too crazy about Beery either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

so fans of her pulchritude

Like the sound of that one...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jet Pilot (1957)  -  5/10

220px-JetPilotPoster.jpg

Aviation romance with John Wayne as an American jet pilot who falls for defecting Soviet pilot Janet Leigh. Also featuring Paul Fix, Jay C. Flippen, Richard Rober, Roland Winters, Ivan Triesault, Paul Frees, Gene Evans, Denver Pyle, Gene Roth, Kenneth Tobey, Mamie Van Doren, and Hans Conried. I'm a bit conflicted on this one: on the one hand, the film is sadly dated due to the long production (filming took place on-and-off from 1949 through 1953, while producer Howard Hughes tinkered with the editing until 1957), with the "cutting-edge" technology rendered obsolete. The filming itself is also dated, looking very much like a film from the late 1940's rather than the late 1950's. The story is corny and old-hat, and the politics simplistic, to put it kindly.

However, it's still an interesting look at jet-age aviation at its beginning. Director Josef von Sternberg also shows an artist's eye for color cinematography that nearly matches his B&W masterpieces. Wayne and Leigh are both game performers, and Leigh in particular rarely looked better. So the film is a mixed bag of pros and cons with the latter slightly tipping the scale, but it's not without some appeal.

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

But the other thing which struck me is--as I watched these trendy losers around me quaffing brewpub ales and dipping their fried cauliflower florets into oxygen-infused dijonnaise--how bizarre it must be to gaze up at the screen where this movie was unreeling and probably not even know who Jimmy Stewart is?????

Why even care? As a good buddy of mine used to say "What planet are you smoking?"

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The chief drawback to using this method is that the image disappears if the original host website pulls it.

If you have a Google account, you should probably have storage space for photos.  In my case, I upload them at my blog.  Whether or not I actually use them in a post there....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Loving You (1957)  -  6/10

220px-Loving_you_poster.jpg

One of the better Elvis movies. He plays an Elvis-like delivery driver in a small southern town who also sings on the side. He gets noticed by promoter Lizabeth Scott, who promptly adds him to the traveling act headlined by Wendell Corey. As Elvis' star rises, Corey gets jealous of the attention Scott is giving the young man. Also featuring Dolores Hart (in her debut) as Presley's love interest, James Gleason, Ralph Dumke, Paul Smith, Kenneth Becker, Jana Lund, and Yvonne Lime. Elvis sings the title song, as well as "Teddy Bear", "Hot Dog", "Got a Lot O' Livin' to Do", "Mean Woman Blues", and the film's standout performance, "Lonesome Cowboy". This was produced by Paramount, who later sold it to CBS, which is why this is the least shown Elvis movie, and has never been released on DVD. I watched an old Goodtimes VHS tape.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Man Without a Body (1957)  -  4/10

220px-%22The_Man_Without_a_Body%22_(1957

American/British co-production that sees US business magnate George Coulouris learning that he has an inoperable brain tumor. He travels to the UK to see scientist Robert Hutton, who keeps a small monkey's head alive on a table. You know, for science and stuff. This gives Coulouris the brilliant idea to travel to France, dig up the body of Nostradamus, steal his head, and then bring it back to Hutton so he can revive it. Which he does (for science), after which Nostradamus moans a bit and blathers on about being "against nature" and giving out stock tips. Meanwhile, Coulouris' much younger girlfriend Nadja Regin has been having an affair with Hutton's assistant (Sheldon Lawrence), which makes the increasingly unstable Coulouris act out. Also featuring Julia Arnall as a woman who inexplicably has romantic feelings for Robert Hutton, perhaps the film's most horrifying idea. This is a lot duller than it sounds, but the ending gets more and more ridiculous, almost making it worth having to see Robert Hutton.

Nostradamus: "I predict that you will all be firing your agents soon."

ManwithoutaBody-pp.JPG

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So whatever happened to Robert Hutton's career anyway?

From gosh golly shy boy-next-door Jimmy Stewart-type roles to sleazy, often with an oily moustache, parts.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, TomJH said:

So whatever happened to Robert Hutton's career anyway?

From gosh golly shy boy-next-door Jimmy Stewart-type roles to sleazy, often with an oily moustache, parts.

 

Didn't he go on to play the scout on Wagon Train???

(...oh wait...sorry, never mind)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Uncle Joe:

Quote

Why even care? As a good buddy of mine used to say "What planet are you smoking?"

Or like the scene where Jodie Foster scoffs at Bobby DeNiro because Travis Bickle is not hip to her lifestyle of prostitution and drugs. He's the square, from where she sits.

The answer is that of course I care. How could anyone --anyone possessing a conscience or a spine, that is --not care? Its a vital quality-of-life issue. This is supposed to be a nation; not 300 million zygotes swimming around alone. Intellectual heritage and cultural heritage should matter to all of us.

Concepts like 'good manners', 'citizenship', 'samaritanship', 'responsibility', 'safety' --these ideas and many others, form the civic realm in which we all take part. The history of USA spells out --to a reasonable extent--what our values and what our duties should be. We learn these values in school; at no point is vagueness or wiftiness an excuse for not knowing them. Naturalized citizens must study and pass a test on such civics, right?

While to very great degree we are free to think whatever we please, there is still plenty which is not open to 'subjective' interpretation. If you back your vehicle over my foot and cause me pain and injury, its not for you to shrug it off with a "yeah, whatever, dude". At some point, pop culture, marketing, individualism, and consumerism ends ...and shared, public reality in which we all alertly participate in, begins.

Therefore yes--I expect people to know what things like 'Watergate' was, what the 'Emancipation Proclamation' was, I expect my neighbors not to own grenades or assault-weapons, not to beat up Native Americans, not to play on smart gadgets when they cross a street, and yes I insist they know who Jimmy Stewart was.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, in MY case anyway, I'd just be happy if everyone knew that Bugs Bunny stole the line "You realize of course this means war" from Groucho Marx.

(...yep, and THEN I'd know all is right in this country again)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Well, in MY case anyway, I'd just be happy if everyone knew that Bugs Bunny stole the line "You realize of course this means war" from Groucho Marx.

(...yep, and THEN I'd know all is right in this country again)

Elmer's Pet Rabbit (1941), and that's the only case where he (or at least that weird transitional Bugs who sounded like Jimmy Stewart) was imitating Groucho's "Night at the Opera" line.  

After classic Bugs in "The Case of the Missing Hare" (1942), it became the nice, slow, vengeful "Of course you realize...."

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Troy (2004) - 👍

(I realize we have to post review scores, so I'm going with Siskel & Ebert's thumb approval/disapproval, rather than arbitrary 5 or 10-based scores.  If I post a positive review, it's usually more a case of "...Just watch it, okay??")

flsr4u1z34y01.jpg

Watched this one, floating all over streaming, mostly out of condescending curiosity, since the mid-00's market was glutted with CGI-heavy attempts at ancient period adventures, rife with CGI-restored ancient scenery, and digitally augmented hordes of ancient armies--The bigger studios were trying to figure out how to make "Gladiator" happen again, while the smaller studios were trying to cash in on the "Gods of War" movie that Brett Ratner was stalling his heels about making, and then two years later, they'd all try again twice as harder wondering where "300" had come from and trying to make that happen again.  This one came out the same year as Oliver Stone's "Alexander", and Ridley Scott's Crusade-era "Kingdom of Heaven" would be the next year, and audience fatigue set in so instantly, it's hard to find anyone who remembers one film apart from the other.  (Quick, who starred in "Alexander"?)

Troy is...rather good, though:  If Warner couldn't get Ridley Scott, they'd yank their never-fail dog-leash of Wolfgang Petersen for more CGI epics (every time Petersen gets a big summer blockbuster, you can hear Warner execs saying "C'mon, c'mon, do another neat big wave, like you did in 'Perfect Storm'!"), who, to his credit, is a little more grounded and businesslike than Scott's artsy pretentions--The Hollywood Wolfgang Petersen is a long way from the German Wolfgang who gave us "Das Boot" and "The Neverending Story", but he still knows how to deliver a straight-on action story.  Here, we get a straight, historically accurate (except for contemporary dialogue) non-mythological retelling of Homer's Iliad and the Trojan War, with every 00's name character actor fit into every classic name:  Brian Cox plays a detestably power-greedy Agamemnon, Orlando Bloom (every 00's sand-epic had to have Bloom, to keep from typecasting him as elves and pirates) plays a naive Paris, an aging Peter O'Toole redeems a few paycheck scenes as King Priam, and Sean Bean's greedy-unhinged expression from the LOTR movies is perfect for savvy horse-trader Odysseus.  The star casting is for Brad Pitt, who, as in "The Assassination of Jesse James", realistically deconstructs another great mythological figure as a narcissistic self-centered jerk, playing warrior Achilles as a fame-obsessed war-diva, but gives Achilles' climactic battle with Hector a bit of emotional edginess that flesh out the stale Homerics, and a few HK-action moves that make ancient Greek combat look like serious business.

It's all straightforward for those who know the story, and pitched as homework-cheat for those who don't, but the appeal is in what Petersen doesn't do:  There's no "artsy" touches, no missing-frame attempts to punch-up the battles, or any of the other vanity showoff excesses we'd have gotten if Ridley Scott had directed it--It's just the good 00's equivalent of a big 50's roadshow-epic, certainly less silly than many of the "Helen of Troy" stories we got of the era, and sticking to business gives it a bit of historical street credit that the big vintage Fox studio sandal-epics only thought they were going after.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Midnight Story (1957)  -  6/10

220px-The_Midnight_Story_-_1957_-_Poster

After a priest is murdered, patrol cop Tony Curtis decides to investigate on his own time, going undercover to try and get proof against his #1 suspect (Gilbert Roland). Curtis ends up becoming a boarder with Roland's extended family, and the policeman falls for Roland's cousin (Marisa Pavan). Also featuring Jay C. Flippen, Argentina Brunetti, Ted de Corsia, Kathleen Freeman, Joe Turkel, and Tito Vuolo. This wasn't bad in any way, just a bit predictable. The San Francisco locations are nice, and the performances are all adequate.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


© 2019 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
×
×
  • Create New...