Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
speedracer5

I Just Watched...

Recommended Posts

4 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Love AUDREY

I've heard her track of Loverly and it was good. I think her track for that and Show Me are on one of the MFL releases but I dont own it. Unsure how she would have handled the higher octave songs, but Loverly was fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Hibi said:

I've heard her track of Loverly and it was good. I think her track for that and Show Me are on one of the MFL releases but I dont own it. Unsure how she would have handled the higher octave songs, but Loverly was fine.

that's the key right there there.

low octaves, minor range, Cockney accent- Audrey's got it down.

But those high notes....

The Lord blessed Audrey in so many ways, but hitting a High C wasn't one of them.

AGAIN: DID I MENTION THAT I LOVE THE WOMAN TO PIECES?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, TomJH said:

Night Watch (1973)

British made mystery about a woman (Elizabeth Taylor) who says she saw a dead body in the window of the dilapidated old house behind her's during a thunderstorm. Her husband and best friend (Billie Whitelaw) see nothing but stand by her. The police, after a search, are doubtful of her claim. Is it her imagination, especially when she says she sees a second body, or is there a plot to drive her crazy?

Tired, ultra familiar thriller, possibly enhanced for some viewers by the star power of Taylor. There's some suspense just prior to a twist ending which some may like but this is clearly a minor effort.

1320702554_1.jpg

2.5 out of 4

I agree, this was disappointing. Changing the locale from NYC to some tony London neighborhood really killed the mood of the story. Plus there wasnt much mystery to it. Only a few ways the plot could have turned out (and I guessed right). Not one of Lucille Fletcher's better efforts (it only had a short run on Broadway).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

that's the key right there there.

low octaves, minor range, Cockney accent- Audrey's got it down.

But those high notes....

The Lord blessed Audrey in so many ways, but hitting a High C wasn't one of them.

AGAIN: DID I MENTION THAT I LOVE THE WOMAN TO PIECES?

LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i'VE ONLY WAtched the deleted SHOW ME scene once, and it kind of broke my heart, because you can SENSE how much AUDREY WANTED TO BE ABLE TO SING THE PART, and she's tryin her heart out and all too...

but it's just out of her range.

nowadays, I'm sure they'd just mix in someone else singing the high notes and autotune the Hell out of it...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lorna,

While I have your attention, Was that Nazi film with Frederic March last night the one you recommended in the past? (the one with the Nazi youth?) I recorded it!  Forget the title, something about Tomorrow....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JEREMY BRETT (?) who played FREDDIE (and was a friend of AUDREY'S) actually had a great singing voice and agreed to be dubbed in his part and I honestly think it was to make AUDREY feel better.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Hibi said:

Lorna,

While I have your attention, Was that Nazi film with Frederic March last night the one you recommended in the past? (the one with the Nazi youth?) I recorded it!  Forget the title, something about Tomorrow....

OMG, YES!!!!!

TOMORROW: THE WORLD!!!!!!!

I LOVE THIS MOVIE!!!!!

SERIOUSLY, THE FUNNIEST COMEDY OF THE 1940'S, HANDS DOWN.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

JEREMY BRETT (?) who played FREDDIE (and was a friend of AUDREY'S) actually had a great singing voice and agreed to be dubbed in his part and I honestly think it was to make AUDREY feel better.

Really? I knew he was dubbed, but I hadn't heard that. It's too bad they couldn't have mixed in Marni Nixon's voice for the high notes and let Audrey sing the lower ones. Maybe it was too difficult or they just didnt want to bother once they decided to dub her.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

OMG, YES!!!!!

TOMORROW: THE WORLD!!!!!!!

I LOVE THIS MOVIE!!!!!

SERIOUSLY, THE FUNNIEST COMEDY OF THE 1940'S, HANDS DOWN.

LOL. Great! I was hoping it was. Can't wait to watch it! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, Hibi said:

LOL. Great! I was hoping it was. Can't wait to watch it! :D

i hope you won't be disappointed.

from a personal standpoint, I have seen this film five or six times and it keeps getting funnier every single time i see it.

i wish like anything it had become an ANDY HARDY-like film series about EMILE THE NAZI YOUTH and his WACKY misadventures in Small Town Back Lot, USA.

Like, even in the context of TODAY I still find it funny.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Really? I knew he was dubbed, but I hadn't heard that. It's too bad they couldn't have mixed in Marni Nixon's voice for the high notes and let Audrey sing the lower ones. Maybe it was too difficult or they just didnt want to bother once they decided to dub her.

It's just a theory I have, might be completely wrong...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

i hope you won't be disappointed.

from a personal standpoint, I have seen this film five or six times and it keeps getting funnier every single time i see it.

i wish like anything it had become an ANDY HARDY-like film series about EMILE THE NAZI YOUTH and his WACKY misadventures in Small Town Back Lot, USA.

Like, even in the context of TODAY I still find it funny.

LMREO!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Hibi said:

LMREO!

i genuinely hope you will be once you see it...

the various reactions of the actors to the young performer playing the NAZI YOUTH are what makes it. Clearly FREDERIC MARCH and PRISCILLA LANE (?) thought they were signing on for something SERIOUS. AGNES MOOREHEAD (professional that she was) totally rolls with it and it's GREAT.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there's a moment onscreen in TOMORROW THE WORLD! where I swear to God, you can literally see FREDRIC MARCH wonder to himself "can they ask for an Oscar back?"

  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, TomJH said:

Night Watch (1973)

British made mystery about a woman (Elizabeth Taylor) who says she saw a dead body in the window of the dilapidated old house behind her's during a thunderstorm. Her husband and best friend (Billie Whitelaw) see nothing but stand by her. The police, after a search, are doubtful of her claim. Is it her imagination, especially when she says she sees a second body, or is there a plot to drive her crazy?

Tired, ultra familiar thriller, possibly enhanced for some viewers by the star power of Taylor. There's some suspense just prior to a twist ending which some may like but this is clearly a minor effort.

1320702554_1.jpg

2.5 out of 4

The twist ending was pretty good, but overall about average. I agree with your your 2.5 out of 4 rating.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, cinemaspeak59 said:

The twist ending was pretty good, but overall about average. I agree with your your 2.5 out of 4 rating.

I assume that many would regard the ending as the highlight of the film, especially if it took them by surprise. I saw a photo on Google Images which gave the ending away, unfortunately, before I saw the film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Art of Love (1965)--Dick Van Dyke stars as a failed artist living in France with fellow American, writer James Garner.  Van Dyke uses all his money to buy a ticket home to the chagrin of Garner (it's Van Dyke's gorgeous wealthy fiance', Angie Dickinson, that has bankrolled their French venture).  The two get drunk, and Van Dyke says if he was dead, his paintings would sell, so Garner pens a suicide note for him. It's all in jest--until Van Dyke jumps into a river to save another suicide 'victim', Elke Sommer.  Everyone thinks Van Dyke is dead, and his art sells like crepes, so when he returns home, the two roomies decide he should remain dead.  Van Dyke hides out at the club, (although it really looks like a bordello) of Madame Coco (Ethel Merman)..and who should be working there as a maid?  Of course it's Sommer.  Things get complicated when Dickinson shows up, not knowing Van Dyke is 'dead', and Garner takes advantage of the situation.  The first hour is quite slow..Van Dyke's character is always disagreeable, Garner oozes con man vibes, and Sommer's naive' schtick grows tiresome.  The pace picks up at the end, when Garner is charged with Van Dyke's murder (set up by a vengeful Van Dyke) and heads to the guillotine. Dickinson and Carl Reiner (as the incompetent lawyer) are pretty much wasted, Merman gets a few over-the-top moments she's known for, but all in all it's a pretty average 60's comedy.  You can watch it here:  maybe you'll like it more than I did...   Related image

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I liked Another Part of the Forest even better the second time around. Very capably directed by Michael Gordon, and an all-star cast. If SOTM F. March seems a little young to be the father of Edmond O'Brien and Dan Duryea, that's not really a problem. March's acting is solid, with a fine performance of the monologue about his past. the one thing that makes him a little sympathetic; Dan Duryea gets to be weak and sleazy, just the way we love him; Ann Blyth was never better than as the young and beautiful, but cold and manipulative Regina; and Edmond O'Brien may never have been better as the older son who tries to throw off the shackles of his domineering father. All four of them may be monsters, but they don't see themselves that way, and the actors don't try to judge the characters they play. Florence Eldridge and Betsy Blair are just as good in the more sympathetic but weak and neurotic roles, and neither becomes so irritating that we want her to suffer (a real problem for anyone playing this kind of character). John Dall plays more of a romantic role than usual, and it's easy to see why Regina is in love with him. His view of war is equally romantic; he longs to go to Brazil where he can fight to defend slavery there. Fritz Leiber has two big scenes as Colonel Isham, the Confederate leader who represents the values of the community, for better and for worse. Dona Drake is fun as the lower-class gal that Duryea wants to marry; she seems downright normal next to the Hubbard family.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Double Bunk (1961)

Amiable, light weight British comedy about a young couple (Ian Carmichael, Janette Scott) who buy a dilapidated houseboat and decide to go on a short honeymoon cruise, getting lost in the fog and somehow winding up in France. Joining them on the excursion is a car salesman friend (Sidney James) who brings along his stripper girlfriend (Liz Fraser).

This is a relaxing, leisurely boat ride of a film that improves as the trip progresses. The charm of the film is in the likability of the cast, in particular the support teaming of James and Fraser (a pair of familiar faces to fans of the Carry On comedies). Fraser excelled at playing slightly ditzy blonde bombshells and the craggy faced James is always amusing, the king of the dirty old man laugh.

The humour in this film is, for the most part, quite innocent. When Sid and Liz have some vodka in a small cabin, and Sid is cackling with a glint in his eye, he passes out before he has a chance to do anything about it. "Oh, Sid," Liz says sadly as she sees him slide to the cabin floor. It's that kind of film and, if you're in a proper mood for this kind of gentle, mildly risque, humour, it's certainly not a film without its charms.

Dennis Price, by the way, excels as the owner of a mooring station who overcharges with his rental fees and later, on his large motor launch, encounters our two couples in France, challenging them to a race home with a big wager. Price is such an insufferably self centred swine in this film, I'm sure even the sharks in the English Channel were rooting for him to lose.

One of the funniest scenes in the film is when Carmichael and James, their faces blackened, sneak aboard Price's launch at night to steal some necessary fuel as Fraser entertains Price and his crowd with a partial strip tease.

By the way, Sid James and Liz Fraser sing a jaunty little song called, appropriately, "Double Bunk," under the film's opening titles. It nicely sets the tone for what is to follow.

MV5BMjE0YjBhMDctZDBjOC00ZDMzLTgwYTItYmI2

2.5 out of 4

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jaws of Satan (1981)  -  4/10

MV5BMTUyOTY4Mzc0N15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNTY2

With the title, I expected a shark movie or another Exorcist/Omen rip-off, but instead this is a killer snake flick. Fritz Weaver gets top billing as a priest that's a little worse for wear. He teams up with a doctor (Gretchen Corbett) and a herpetologist (Jon Korkes) to try and stop a murderous cobra that's causing all the local rattlesnakes to act more aggressive. The cobra ends up being Satan in disguise, attempting to carry out a curse on Weaver's family line for their subjugation of the Druids centuries earlier. Also featuring Diana Douglas, Norman Lloyd, Bob Hannah, Nancy Priddy, John McCurry, and 9-year-old Christina Applegate in her film debut. This movie is goofy and sloppy, but it's unusual, and the Alabama locations add another off-beat flavor. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

He did not mention the 1967 Peter Cook/Dudley Moore comedy "Bedazzled" which I liked very much.

Bedazzled was one of my favorite films as a youth. I still think it's Dudley Moore's best role and love Peter Cook & Eleanor Bron's talents in this.

MV5BMjE0YjBhMDctZDBjOC00ZDMzLTgwYTItYmI2

What is he holding in this picture? A transistor radio? Looks like a modern digital camera or even a 110 film camera. (like anyone even noticed)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

 

MV5BMjE0YjBhMDctZDBjOC00ZDMzLTgwYTItYmI2

What is he holding in this picture? A transistor radio? Looks like a modern digital camera or even a 110 film camera. (like anyone even noticed)

It's a transistor radio, which plays a role in the story when it is placed beside the houseboat's magnetic compass, knocking it out of whack, thus sending the foursome on an unexpected trip to France.

Liz Fraser and Sid James were teamed in a number of films, and had a nice chemistry. Fraser always spoke well of him, saying he would give her a hug and never tried anything inappropriate with her or obscene. She says she later saw a play about James in which he was portrayed as a horrible lech in real life, a portrait of the actor that upset her. The actress also called Double Bunk her favourite film around this part of her career.

At one point in Double Bunk Sid James has a line of dialogue, along the lines of "I'll either drown or have heart failure." That's a little prophetic as he would have a heart attack in 1967, later that year playing in Carry On Doctor. His character was a bed ridden patient in that film and that's the reason he could join the film because he could play his role in bed.

Sid James would die of a heart attack in 1976 after appearing in 19 of what would turn out to be 30 Carry On films.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, kingrat said:

I liked Another Part of the Forest even better the second time around. 

John Dall plays more of a romantic role than usual, and it's easy to see why Regina is in love with him. His view of war is equally romantic; he longs to go to Brazil where he can fight to defend slavery there.

I saw this for the first time yesterday (TCM on HULU) and I liked it, but the hyper-critic in me had one big issue with it, which was that it lacked a central character.

I think it would have been a stronger movie had it settled on making MARCH, BLYTH or O'BRIEN the main character instead of it's being a genuine ensemble film where it seemed as if everyone got 1/3 screen time, almost a pre-Altman-style movie; I guess they felt odd about making a villain the main character, but the mid-to-late-40's were by this time rife with successful films where a villain was the lead, so  i think they should've embraced it.

FREDRIC MARCH was really impressive (as a real silver-plated SOB), reminded me a bit of his later work in INHERIT THE WIND where he just lets all the vanity go...speaking of, I get the feeling he did this movie for the chance to make his wife center stage at the end, her triumphant walk up the steps at the finale of the movie was a DeHavilland in THE HEIRESS-type moment, but again, nice as it was, it just highlighted for me how the film seemed to suffer from a lack of a protagonist (an occasional character gets THE last scene?)

thank you for pointing that out about DALL's character!!! I did not realize he was specifically going to fight FOR the cause of slavery in BRAZIL, that (in and of itself) could be a pretty funny concept for a movie: some sort of halfassed DON QUIXOTE warrior-for-hire for the cause of the rights of people to oppress others. what a Prince.

again, the film could've spent more time on the genteel, decaying cotton plantation family....i get the feeling they made the HUBBARDS seem downright functional by comparison.

There was also an interesting subplot about a lynching that i felt didn't get fully explored...a

as hypercritical as i can be, i can also be a little obtuse: why was this movie called ANOTHER PART OF THE FOREST? did they explain it (as they do in THE LITTLE FOXES) and I missed it?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/20/2019 at 9:25 AM, Det Jim McLeod said:

He did not mention the 1967 Peter Cook/Dudley Moore comedy "Bedazzled" which I liked very much.

He did say there were some of his films he did not like, I wonder if this was one of them.

It probably was covered but edited out. These interviews are often edited due to time constraints. They keep them under an hour. Donen's easily could have gone another hour.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
×
×
  • Create New...