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I Just Watched...

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41 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

Apparently, this common thought (guilt, remorse) goes through everyone's mind after someone they loved dies of suicide. Eerily similar to MM's death timeline, as you noted earlier. I'm not as much on top of Ladd's story. But you're right, he looks like 5 miles of bad road for being only 47 in that photo. Although, not all men can age as well as Sean Connery, genetics is also a contributing factor. (be careful of all the factors you CAN control!)

 

It might not be too inappropriate, at that, to use the word love in describing the bond of friendship that Alan Ladd had with William Bendix. Classic illustration, too, of such an odd couple both physically as well as in personality. But the fun loving Bendix helped to bring out the joker in the serious Ladd, as well as his financial generosity.

They met while making The Glass Key in 1942, with Bendix playing a strong arm goon who beats up Ladd in one rather nasty scene. In the midst of shooting the scene, however, Bendix's fist accidentally connected with Ladd's jaw, knocking him out. When Ladd came to the first thing he saw was Bendix with tears streaming down his face. Ladd was so touched by Bill's concern that they became fast friends, the Ladds even helping Bendix and his wife find a home which was situated directly across the street from their house.

Then one evening while the two couples were together Sue Carol (Ladd's wife) suddenly made a disparaging comment about Bendix not having joined any U.S. armed service (it was WW2). Bendix had asthma, which had kept him out of the services, but he was stung by her comment and walked out of the Ladd house. He half expected Alan to run across the street to make amends but Ladd didn't, thinking that Bendix had been rude to his wife in his reaction to her comment.

The two friends stopped speaking to one another, Bendix eventually selling his home because he found it too uncomfortable living so close to a former friend. The two men were still co-starred by Paramount in a couple of films, including The Blue Dahlia, and while they were professional with one another on the set they still didn't speak to each other when the cameras stopped rolling. Ladd's wife, for example, would set up snacks for the cast and crew in Ladd's trailer or dressing room while making a film but Bendix would never join in.

Finally one day, after a number of years had passed, Ladd called Bendix on the phone, saying this was crazy, that he didn't even remember was the fall out was over. Bendix agreed, the two couples got together again, and it was almost as if there had never been a strain in the relationship. They would remain close friends until Ladd's death. It's ironic, of course, that they both died the same year.

William-Bendix-&-Alan-Ladd-At-Lux-Radio-

 

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People should always handle their gripes face-to-face, out in the open. Everyone suffers whenever this doesn't happen.

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55 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

While Gary Busey made a great Buddy Holly, I noticed one of my faves Charles Martin Smith playing bass in that clip. Super talent of our time, he elevates every picture he's in, kind of like our beloved character actors of the golden age. I think '83's NEVER CRY WOLF is a CLASSIC film.

Busey, Smith and drummer Don Stroud were all playing their own instruments in the musical scenes. One of my favorite of CM Smith's performances was as the bookish federal government accountant who joins Eliot Ness to take down Al Capone in "The Untouchables"

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so, I try not to get ANGRY at movies anymore....I realize that filmmaking is a collaborative process, that someone may write a great script that is ruined by an idiot director; that a director may direct a great film that is sabotaged by a bad editor or studio, or that- in spite of the best efforts of everyone involved- the souffle just does not rise.

that said, I saw most of TERMINAL MAN (1974) on TCM UNDERgROUND and my gut reaction going away is "**** this movie with a rusty tailpipe. Repeatedly."

If you, or someone you know, saw FITZCARRALDO and said "wow, the scene where  the entire steamship slowly proceeds from bow to stern across the screen was good, but really, it could've been even SLOWER and more languid, like maybe they could have stopped the boat right before it got to the end and put it in reverse and run it across the screen three or four more times?"- then TERMINAL MAN is THE MOVIE FOR YOU (or that someone.)

It is PURE, UN-DISTILLED, 100 PROOF CINEMATIC TEDIUM.

STILL NOT CONVINCED? COPIED AND PASTED FROM THE WIKI ENTRY FOR THE FILM:

The director Terrence Malick wrote to Hodges expressing how much he loved watching The Terminal Man, saying "I have just come from seeing The Terminal Man and want you to know what a magnificent, overwhelming picture it is. You achieve moods that I’ve never experienced in the movies before, though it’s only in hope of finding them that I keep going. Your images make me understand what an image is, not a pretty picture but something that should pierce one through like an arrow and speak in a language all its own."[6]

(END QUOTE)

THE FIRST HOUR AND FORTY MINUTES OF THE FILM: GEORGE SEGAL GOES TO THE HOSPITAL AND HAS A CoMPUTER CHIP PUT IN HIS BRAIN (in a scene that takes about 35 minutes and exactly **** **** happens during it). THEN HE LAYS AROUND WHILE SOME IDIOT DOCTORS GO TO THE WORLD'S MOST JOYLESS PARTY AT THE ENNIS WRIGHT HOUSE. THEN HE ESCAPES AND KILLS JILL CLAYBURGH AND THE DOCTORS STAND AROUND AND WHISPER ABOUT WHAT TO DO.

THAT IS ALL.

It is also not helped that GEORGE SEGAL may be the only actor of the 1970's who I find even less appealing or interesting to watch than ELLIOT GOULD (and at least GOULD was great in THE LONG GOODBYE) and he is dressed JUST LIKE FAYE DUNAWAY IN MOMMIE DEAREST FOR MOST OF THE FILM (white turban and robe with shoulderpads) OR THAT- I KID YOU NOT- HE MAKES THE "BILL COSBY YUMMY FACE" RIGHT BEFORE HE IS ABOUT TO GO ON A KILLING RAMPAGE.

I seriously hated this movie and the master print needs to be stored in a warm, wet salty place.

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Just now, LornaHansonForbes said:

It is also not helped that GEORGE SEGAL may be the only actor of the 1970's who I find even less appealing or interesting to watch than ELLIOT GOULD

Have you seen "California Split" ?

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1 minute ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Have you seen "California Split" ?

No, I have not....but i have heard good things about it here.

(it's possible SEGAL is terrific in something I have yet to see)

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Just now, LornaHansonForbes said:

No, I have not....but i have heard good things about it here.

(it's possible SEGAL is terrific in something I have yet to see)

Elliot Gould is in it too!

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Just now, Det Jim McLeod said:

Elliot Gould is in it too!

To be fair, I used to think ELLIOT GOULD was just awful and then I saw THE LONG GOODBYE, and honestly, he should've been nominated for it he is that good in it.

(so I'm always open to changing my mind)

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on a more positive note tho, I saw SUSAN LENOX: HER FALL AND RISE (1931 MGM) with GARBO AND GABLE.

44065662925_570195424f.jpg

It was a tremendously fun pre-Code- reminded me quite a bit of the later FLAMINGO ROAD- and GARBO stars in "a runaway-becomes-Carnival Girl-becomes high class call girl in orchids and organza" story that one could much more easily envision CRAWFORD or Loretta Young starring in, but Greta gives it her Swedish all. She also wears the above outfit, which seems to have a kind of Halle Berry Oscar Dress vibe, no?

It is one of the more frank and lurid precodes i've seen- it makes no illusions about the fact that Garbo's character is sleeping with many of the men she meets, and it has two sexual assault scenes that are pretty unsettling and still hit home in the 21st century.

it also has a scene where CLARK GABLE'S "Hero" rejects a dance hall girl's advances by picking her up and throwing her off a second story landing where she lands (unseen) on a table below, presumably to pretty serious injury.

they don't make 'em like this anymore...and that may not be an entirely bad thing....

if GARBO AND GABLE didn't get along on set, i don't see it in the final print. they have terrific chemistry.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

It is also not helped that GEORGE SEGAL may be the only actor of the 1970's who I find even less appealing or interesting to watch than ELLIOT GOULD

And here I thought that 1) I was the only one who often conflated these two actors, and 2) also never cared for either of them all that much. I also learned to like Gould more after seeing The Long Goodbye, and I also liked and recommend California Split, although if you hate Robert Altman's style (I don't) it might not be your bag. There are frequent verbal love-fests for those two actors on here, so I usually keep my dislike of them to myself, but you've opened that door, so I had to chime in.

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a major factor in my "mehness" to SEGAL is related to the fact that I was introduced to him via the sitcom JUST SHOOT ME, about which, really and frankly, everything is best forgot IN SPITE OF THE FACT THAT IT RAN FOR LIKE 12 SEASONS OR SOMETHING....

(I GENUINELY THINK THEY JUST DIDN'T KNOW IT WAS STILL ON THE AIR FOR THE LAST THREE SEASONS AND THAT WAS HOW IT AVOIDED CANCELLATION)

00ps- CAPS LOCK WAS ON, SORRY.

also also his role in LOOK WHO'S TALKING where he plays a major hole.

 

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College Confidential (1960)  -  3/10

college-confidential.jpg

Another lump of stupidity from writer-producer-director Albert Zugsmith, who assembles another of his bizarre casts to embarrass themselves. Steve Allen stars as a hep-cat college professor doing a study on the sexual habits of the young set. Newspaper reporter Jayne Meadows is doing a story on Allen and his project, and whether or not it's obscene. Also featuring Mamie Van Doren, Conway Twitty, Herbert Marshall, Elisha Cook, Mickey Shaughnessy, William Wellman Jr., Cathy Crosby, Randy Sparks, Pamela Mason, Rocky Marciano, Ziva Rodann, Norman "Woo Woo" Grabowski, and Walter Winchell. Normally I'm amused by this kind of dumb trash, but I'm in a bad mood today, and this came across as just tedious idiocy.

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On 3/29/2019 at 1:35 PM, Janet0312 said:

Naked Lust in Sinful Sweden  

 

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

College Confidential (1960)  -  3/10

Wait a second: the whole crew made two college movies in 1960?  This doesn't sound like Sex Kittens Go to College got a different name.

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2 minutes ago, Fedya said:

Wait a second: the whole crew made two college movies in 1960?  This doesn't sound like Sex Kittens Go to College got a different name.

No, they're different movies. I also have Sex Kittens in my stack to watch. 

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I hope you're not still in a bad mood when you watch Sex Kittens, or you'll hate that one, too.

And wait until you get to Dondi in the 1961 stack.  :o

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The Day They Robbed the Bank of England (1960)  -  7/10

51cZ6cHGPSL.jpg

British crime drama about a 1901 gold heist pulled off by Irish revolutionaries. Aldo Ray stars as an American member of the Irish cause who masterminds the bank job. Featuring Peter O'Toole, Elizabeth Sellars, Kieron Moore, Albert Sharpe, Joseph Tomelty, Wolf Frees, John Le Mesurier, Miles Malleson, Colin Gordon, Andrew Keir, and Hugh Griffith. Aldo Ray seems an odd casting choice, but he's not bad. This was one of O'Toole's first roles, but he comes across as a longtime screen veteran, and looks older than his actual 28 years, sporting a thick shock of black hair and a mustache.

Bank+of+England.jpg

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6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

so, I try not to get ANGRY at movies anymore....

THE FIRST HOUR AND FORTY MINUTES OF THE FILM: GEORGE SEGAL GOES TO THE HOSPITAL AND HAS A CoMPUTER CHIP PUT IN HIS BRAIN (in a scene that takes about 35 minutes and exactly **** **** happens during it). THEN HE LAYS AROUND WHILE SOME IDIOT DOCTORS GO TO THE WORLD'S MOST JOYLESS PARTY AT THE ENNIS WRIGHT HOUSE. THEN HE ESCAPES AND KILLS JILL CLAYBURGH AND THE DOCTORS STAND AROUND AND WHISPER ABOUT WHAT TO DO.

THAT IS ALL.

I KID YOU NOT- HE MAKES THE "BILL COSBY YUMMY FACE" RIGHT BEFORE HE IS ABOUT TO GO ON A KILLING RAMPAGE.

You saw it on TCM?  I saw it in a theater.  With an audience.  An all-night sci-fi festival.  At 2am.  😫

It didn't take us long to figure out that, despite the Crichton name, there was no actual movie here.  (Even "Looker" would have been a more entertaining Michael Crichton film to sit through.)  There's nothing like a slightly punchy all-night 2am audience scorned to start a nice mutiny--Every time the scene faded out, we cheered "Yayy!", and then "Awww!" when the next scene faded in.  When Jill Clayburg goes out on a balcony, we all shouted "Jump, jump!  Save yourself!"

4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

a major factor in my "mehness" to SEGAL is related to the fact that I was introduced to him via the sitcom JUST SHOOT ME, about which, really and frankly, everything is best forgot IN SPITE OF THE FACT THAT IT RAN FOR LIKE 12 SEASONS OR SOMETHING....

I literally didn't know he was still around until someone made me watch an episode of "The Goldbergs".

Segal's entire acting style just seemed to belong to the early 70's.

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The Devil's Eye (1960)  -  7/10

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Swedish romantic fantasy from director Ingmar Bergman. "A woman's chastity is a sty in the devil's eye", or so an old saying goes, so when Satan (Stig Jarrel) gets a painful sty in his eye, he sends damned soul Don Juan (Jarl Kulle) to the land of the living to seduce 20-year-old virgin Britt-Marie (Bibi Andersson), a vicar's daughter who is engaged to be married. Featuring Nils Poppe, Gertrud Fridh, Sture Lagerwell, and Gunnar Bjornstrand. This is much lighter material than Bergman is known for, but I suppose he wanted a respite between The Virgin Spring and Through a Glass, Darkly. I liked the depiction of Hell, and Bjornstrand is enjoyable as the film's MC/narrator. 

 

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Five Bold Women (1960)  -  4/10

five-bold-women-1960-dvd-325a.jpg

Low-budget western featuring Jeff Morrow as a U.S. marshal tasked with transporting 5 women to prison through hostile territory. With Merry Anders as "The Missouri Lady", Irish McCalla as "Big Pearl", Kathy Marlowe as "Faro Kitty", Lucita Blain as "Maria the Knife", and Dee Carroll as "Crazy Hanna". Also with Guinn "Big Boy" Williams as "Bigfoot", Jim Ross, Robert Caffey, and George Kramer. I watched this for McCalla, who looks terrific as the toughest gal in the west. The script and the filmmaking are both pretty bad, though. This was among the final films for Big Boy Williams, who died in 1962 with over 200 film and TV credits.

five-bold-women06.jpg  five-bold-women04.jpg

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31 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Five Bold Women (1960)  -  4/10

five-bold-women-1960-dvd-325a.jpg

L  

I disagree with the premise stated on the poster.

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8 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

It is also not helped that GEORGE SEGAL may be the only actor of the 1970's

He's great in King RatThe Bridge at Remagen, Born to Win.

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17 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

He's great in King RatThe Bridge at Remagen, Born to Win.

I liked him in King Rat, or I should say, he was good in the role. I thought he was all wrong in Born to Win when I watched it many years ago, but perhaps I'd like him more now. I have a copy of it since De Niro's in it, too.

I haven't seen The Bridge at Remagen.

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Foxhole in Cairo (1960)  -  6/10

220px-Foxhole_in_Cairo_(1960_film).jpg

It's 1942, and the British are preparing for a major offensive against Rommel's German forces. In Cairo, Nazi agents attempt to learn valuable info to help thwart the Allied effort, resulting in a game of cat-and-mouse between German and British factions. Featuring James Robertson Justice, Adrian Hoven, Niall MacGinnis, Neil McCallum, Albert Lieven, Robert Urquhart, Fenella Fielding, Gloria Mestre, Peter Van Eyck, and Michael Caine. This mediocre war effort is unusual in that there really isn't a definite leading role. The story jumps from the British officers led by Justice to the Germans supervised by Hoven to the shady characters led by MacGinnis. Michael Caine has one of his larger early roles as a German radio man.

2517-6732-0.jpg

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