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The Bounty Killer (1965)

A minor western that manages, despite its "B" budget shortcomings, to maintain a general interest throughout due to a cast of veteran western actors and the performance of its lead actor.

Dan Duryea is cast, unexpectedly at first, as a gentlemanly, naive easterner freshly arrived in a rough western town who soon gets forced into a fight by a bar bully and gets his neck saved by an outlaw (Rod Cameron) who cold bloodedly guns down the bully. Duryea knows nothing about guns but Cameron gives him the advice that he'll have to learn about them in order to survive before he then goes on the dodge for his latest killing.

The film follows Duryea's path as he decides to take a job guarding a payroll, killing some outlaws who ambush him and his partner in the process. One of the outlaws has a price on his head and Duryea found the process so relatively easy that he naively decides to become a bounty hunter, hoping to bring his prey back alive. Things will not go as planned and Duryea will swear vengeance as we see him slowly evolve into a stone cold killer who hunts down and kills countless bandits with a price on their head. He no longer tries to take them alive, and gets a feared reputation, even among law abiding townsfolk.

The film takes quite a few shortcuts when it comes to the action scenes, a reflection of its limited budget, and there are also some implausibilities, such as Duryea, who initially knows nothing about guns, becoming a one man gunsmith as he transforms a shotgun into an effective quick killing weapon that he can quickly withdraw from a holster.

But Duryea, who was clearly looking his age when this film was made three years prior his death, is fun to watch in the film's early scenes as a naive dude out west. He later looks more familiar when he plays the hardened killer into which his character evolves.

Audrey Long, way too young for Duryea, plays a downcast saloon girl who is initially drawn to his kindness, and the supporting cast, again, is a bit of a Who's Who of Hollywood veterans, most of whom it is assumed needed the employment: among them Fuzzy Knight as a former sailor who becomes Duryea's bounty hunting partner, Buster Crabbe, a long way from Flash Gordon, as a ruthless outlaw, Johnny Mack Brown, barely recognizable as a Santa Claus-sized sheriff, and Richard Arlen as Long's father who delivers a line of dialogue to that daughter that speaks on behalf of a lot of fathers ("I love you, honey, but you're sure no judge of men").

Other familiar faces to be found lurking around these "B" western parts: Bob Steele, Grady Sutton, Eddie Quillan, Emory Parnell and "Broncho Billy" Anderson, an actor called the first western cowboy star. This was Anderson's final film appearance as "Man in a Cantina." Unfortunately, when I watched this film I didn't know which man he was.

For those who enjoy seeing a variety of Hollywood veterans finding late career employment, as well as fans of Dan Duryea, who delivers an entertaining performance towards the end of his career, you can do a lot worse with your time than view a time waster like The Bounty Killer.

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQj47Bm9Mns1Y7wKGv8gVF

2.5 out of 4

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Fine review Tom Man. Yea 'Bounty Hunter' is fairly renowned among B western fans, its many good qualities making it a regular member of the 'unfairly neglected' type lists

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Face of the Screaming Werewolf (1964)  -  1/10

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Grade-Z producer-director Jerry Warren takes footage from two Mexican films, The Aztec Mummy (1957) and House of Terror (1959), chops them to pieces, shoots some new (extremely low budget) stuff in America, then stitches it all together into a one-hour-long affront to cinema. The incoherent plot concerns scientists working with hypnosis and past-life regression, which leads them to an Aztec temple containing two mummies, one the Aztec Mummy that starred in its own film series, and another, Egyptian-style mummy played by Lon Chaney Jr. This second mummy is later brought back to life by another group of scientists (with a hidden lab in the back room of a wax museum), but since it's Lon Chaney Jr., the revived fellow also turns out to be a bloodthirsty werewolf. This is truly one of the worst films ever made, but it contains enough unintentional humor to make it worth seeing for bad movie fans, or for pranking people, especially those in an altered state of mind. There's a copy up on YouTube, but you'll want to fast-forward through the terrible Svengoolie-wannabe "horror host".

 

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The Minotaur, the Wild Beast of Crete (1960)  -  6/10

220px-Minotaur-the-wild-beast-of-crete-m

Italian sword-n-sandal fantasy with Olympian and future US Congressman Bob Mathias as Theseus, the hero who tries to save the Cretans from the dreaded half-man/half-bull dwelling under the king's palace in a vast labyrinth. Also featuring top-billed (at least in the Italian version) Rosanna Schiaffino in a dual role as the evil Princess Phaedra and her lookalike Ariadne, a nice girl from a small village nearby. With Rik Battaglia, Alberto Lupo, Carlo Tamberlani, Paul Muller, Nico Pepe, and Susanne Loret.  I liked the big, detailed sets and the colorful costumes. Mathias was a better athlete than he was an actor, but he gets to throw a javelin, so there's that. The film fails a bit during the poorly shot battle scenes, and the eventual reveal of the Minotaur will elicit more laughs than screams, although I have to give the effects guys some credit for trying to use an articulated monster head instead of an immobile mask.

Theseus learns where the wild things are.

creta4Minotaur.jpg

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17 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

i was a little under the weather yesterday, so i watched a lot of stuff and a lot of bits and pieces of stuff...

i watched all of PENNIES FROM HEAVEN (MGM 1981) a HERBERT ROSS directed musical starring STEVE MARTIN and BERNADETTE PETERS that seems to be very little discussed and mostly forgotten today- although, WOW! could I EVER see its influence on later movies (CHICAGO especially owes it a HUUUUUUUUGE debit. Like, probably should've included an "inspired by" note in the credits)

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I thought it was going to be a comedy and holy ****, was it ever not a comedy.

that said, it was  a good- if challenging- movie and (while i liked it quite a bit) I could totally see how someone else would not. I am also not surprised that it was a COLOSSAL FLOP (earning 9 million against a 22 million budget- OUCH!)...MARTIN is okay, but he shouldn't have done this film for a variety of reasons, BERNADETTE PETERS is marvelous- I'm still not entirely sure why she never became a BIG movie star, other than she seems somewhat from another time period.) The actor who played the school principal who fires PETERS when she gets pregnant was outstanding (I know him as the Priest Dorothy falls in love with on season 2 of THE GOLDEN GIRLS)-he did SO MUCH with a small part. JESSICA HARPER (of SUSPIRIA and PHANTOM OF THE PARADISE) is also outstanding as Martin's frigid wife. CHRISTOPHER WALKEN is very, very good his one scene.

 

I really enjoy this movie as well. I agree; Bernadette Peters was great in this, and I really wish she had made more movies, because she was definitely a refreshing presence on-screen. I like this one, because it's a movie musical, but not in the traditional sense. It has a different and darker feel to it. 

Speaking of, I recently found the vinyl soundtrack to this movie at a local record store, and have been listening to it quite frequently as of late. The "Life is Just a Bowl of Cherries" (as pictured above) is probably my favorite number in the film, besides "Love is Good for Anything That Ails You." 

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14 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Key Witness (1960)  -  7/10

keywitness-1.jpg

Well Lawrence, you again found & watched an obscure movie that I have the poster of (above) Did the "song hit" Ruby Duby Doo get stuck in your head? (glad it was a half decent movie)

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8 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Fine review Tom Man. Yea 'Bounty Hunter' is fairly renowned among B western fans, its many good qualities making it a regular member of the 'unfairly neglected' type lists

Really? I didn't know anyone talked about this decent little western. Bounty Killer's "B" budget and cast of Hollywood veterans in their career declining years made me think of some of the similar productions released in the '60s by producer A. C. Lyles, such as Town Tamer.

220px-Town_Tamer_poster.jpg

Sadly, Linda Darnell had virtually no film work in her last eight years until Lyles cast her (along with a lot of other Hollywood veterans) in Black Spurs, a "B" western released two months after her tragic death in a fire. I've looked around for a copy of Black Spurs but have had difficulty finding one. Darnell, as you can see, didn't receive much emphasis in the poster artwork though she does, at least, get second billing. I'm assuming that Arturo has been able to find a copy of this one.

MV5BZTBhYTE2NWMtZmM0Yy00MDNkLWI0MTYtMmEz

 

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Yea Bounty Killer is a cult film for sure; I've seen it quietly but passionately talked about for years among western aficionados. The shotgun drawn from a leg holster by a guy who doesn't know how to really shoot; and finally getting his just desserts...Greek undertones to this...

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Wow @ reading the wiki page for 'Pennies From Heaven'. Dennis Potter, responsible for the BBC version, did the adaptation for the American version. I didn't know that. Remarks from Steve Martin about why it failed, why he worked so hard on it... the reaction from Fred Astaire...whooooeee

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1 hour ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Yea Bounty Killer is a cult film for sure; I've seen it quietly but passionately talked about for years among western aficionados. The shotgun drawn from a leg holster by a guy who doesn't know how to really shoot; and finally getting his just desserts...Greek undertones to this...

Inspired by Steve McQueen in Wanted Dead Or Alive? I couldn't find any photos with the refurbished shotgun in Duryea's holster, unfortunately.

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MV5BMDkwZjZlMTAtMGNmYy00ZjdhLTlhYjQtM2Y4

Steve-McQueen-Wanted-Dead-or-Alive.jpg

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-_- Could be, I don't know for sure. I'm recalling scuttlebutt I skimmed my eyes over from years ago, and forgot all about in the interval. Anyway, that's a fab trio of pics, Duryea sure looks like he 'means business'. Lol at the neckerchiefs though.

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7 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Face of the Screaming Werewolf (1964)  -  1/10

818vwFjVP-L._SY445_.jpg

Grade-Z producer-director Jerry Warren takes footage from two Mexican films, The Aztec Mummy (1957) and House of Terror (1959), chops them to pieces, shoots some new (extremely low budget) stuff in America....Egyptian-style mummy played by Lon Chaney Jr. This second mummy is later brought back to life by another group of scientists (with a hidden lab in the back room of a wax museum), but since it's Lon Chaney Jr., the revived fellow also turns out to be a bloodthirsty werewolf. This is truly one of the worst films ever made,

and yet....if i recall correctly (and i may not)...the werewolf scenes have Chaney somehow re-using a latex-mask he kept from one of his WOLF MAN outings, or somehow re-creating his make-up (tapping into the make-up talent that had to be in his DNA...?) pretty damn accurately, to an unsettling degree even.

the, like, minute and a half where he becomes The Wolf Man in a lab is still pretty firm in my mind even though it's been a long time since i saw it.

(the movie sucks, but that segment is well-done is my point.)

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Pufnstuf (1970) 6/10

Image result for pufnstuf movie poster

I was a big fan of the TV show and this was a good movie version. Jack Wild gets to sing some songs and Billie Hayes as Witchiepoo is even wackier than before, she even talks directly to the audience at the beginning and end of the film.

Martha Raye shows up as the Boss Witch of a witches convention. My favorite song was "Different" sung by Mama Cass Elliot as Witch Hazel. It was very catchy and has the same message as her 1969 hit "Make Your Own Kind Of Music".

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4 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Wow @ reading the wiki page for 'Pennies From Heaven'. Dennis Potter, responsible for the BBC version, did the adaptation for the American version. I didn't know that. Remarks from Steve Martin about why it failed, why he worked so hard on it... the reaction from Fred Astaire...whooooeee

Yeah, old Fred just missed the point of the whole thing entirely, didn't he?

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Well...prostitutes, pimps, strippers; accordion-playing hobos murdering little blind girls...I guess its not hard to see why it might not be to Fred's taste. Not sure what to say about it though, I heart Fred Astaire.

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The League of Gentlemen (1960)  -  7/10

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British crime comedy directed by Basil Dearden from a script by Bryan Forbes. Jack Hawkins stars as a former army officer who assembles a team of other former soldiers who have fallen on hard times in order to commit a complicated heist. Featuring Richard Attenborough, Roger Livesey, Nigel Patrick, Kieron Moore, Bryan Forbes, Terence Alexander, Norman Bird, Robert Coote, Melissa Stribling, Nanette Newman, David Lodge, Patrick Wymark, Nigel Green, and Oliver Reed. A great cast and a detailed script makes for an enjoyable ride, even if it's a tad too long. There's some surprising story elements, such as Moore's character being blackmailed for his (implied) homosexuality, and a quick appearance by Oliver Reed as a mincing actor who interrupts a meeting of the would-be robbers.

 

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Les Bonnes Femmes (1960)  -  5/10

220px-Les-bonnes-femmes.jpg

 

French New wave comedy-drama from director Claude Chabrol. Four young women (Bernadette Lafont, Clotilde Joano, Lucile Saint-Simon, and Stephane Audran) look for love and meaning in Paris. Also with Pierre Bertin, Jean-Louis Maury, Albert Dinan, and Claude Berri. I found this banal and uninteresting. The actresses were good, the men were not. There's development late in the film intended to shock, but I didn't care by that point. Many people love this movie, but it did nothing for me.

Source: Kino DVD

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18 hours ago, TomJH said:

The Bounty Killer (1965)

A minor western that manages, despite its "B" budget shortcomings, to maintain a general interest throughout due to a cast of veteran western actors and the performance of its lead actor.

Dan Duryea is cast, unexpectedly at first, as a gentlemanly, naive easterner freshly arrived in a rough western town who soon gets forced into a fight by a bar bully and gets his neck saved by an outlaw (Rod Cameron) who cold bloodedly guns down the bully. Duryea knows nothing about guns but Cameron gives him the advice that he'll have to learn about them in order to survive before he then goes on the dodge for his latest killing.

The film follows Duryea's path as he decides to take a job guarding a payroll, killing some outlaws who ambush him and his partner in the process. One of the outlaws has a price on his head and Duryea found the process so relatively easy that he naively decides to become a bounty hunter, hoping to bring his prey back alive. Things will not go as planned and Duryea will swear vengeance as we see him slowly evolve into a stone cold killer who hunts down and kills countless bandits with a price on their head. He no longer tries to take them alive, and gets a feared reputation, even among law abiding townsfolk.

The film takes quite a few shortcuts when it comes to the action scenes, a reflection of its limited budget, and there are also some implausibilities, such as Duryea, who initially knows nothing about guns, becoming a one man gunsmith as he transforms a shotgun into an effective quick killing weapon that he can quickly withdraw from a holster.

But Duryea, who was clearly looking his age when this film was made three years prior his death, is fun to watch in the film's early scenes as a naive dude out west. He later looks more familiar when he plays the hardened killer into which his character evolves.

Audrey Long, way too young for Duryea, plays a downcast saloon girl who is initially drawn to his kindness, and the supporting cast, again, is a bit of a Who's Who of Hollywood veterans, most of whom it is assumed needed the employment: among them Fuzzy Knight as a former sailor who becomes Duryea's bounty hunting partner, Buster Crabbe, a long way from Flash Gordon, as a ruthless outlaw, Johnny Mack Brown, barely recognizable as a Santa Claus-sized sheriff, and Richard Arlen as Long's father who delivers a line of dialogue to that daughter that speaks on behalf of a lot of fathers ("I love you, honey, but you're sure no judge of men").

Other familiar faces to be found lurking around these "B" western parts: Bob Steele, Grady Sutton, Eddie Quillan, Emory Parnell and "Broncho Billy" Anderson, an actor called the first western cowboy star. This was Anderson's final film appearance as "Man in a Cantina." Unfortunately, when I watched this film I didn't know which man he was.

For those who enjoy seeing a variety of Hollywood veterans finding late career employment, as well as fans of Dan Duryea, who delivers an entertaining performance towards the end of his career, you can do a lot worse with your time than view a time waster like The Bounty Killer.

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQj47Bm9Mns1Y7wKGv8gVF

2.5 out of 4

May 2008...

This was a pretty low budget Western that looks like it. Too many exterior shots were done in the studio & well, it looks like it. Its bad but bad the way Johnny Guitar is bad. The story is interesting however basically an Eastern Dude from Vermont (Duryea) teams up with (Fuzzy Knight) an ex ship captain (who sailed a prairie "wind wagon" across the Great Plains until it broke down) and they turn into bounty hunters after a failed payroll robbery where they kill the would be robbers and collect their bounty. Its at first sort of goofy and played tounge in cheek but after Knight gets killed off Duryea goes cold blooded. Its got some twists and turns and even a Spaghetti Western like ending.

Its got Duryea designing a sawed-off double barrel shotgun that he wears in a holster (like Mississippi (James Caan) in El Dorado) with a bandoleer gunbelt filled with shot shells). 

Its chock full of veteran 30's-40's era Western Stars and even has G.M.  "Broncho Billy" Anderson (from the "Great Train Robbery" (1903) make an appearance.

Duryea is just not very believable tough in the part. His son Peter gets a interesting part in the film.
 

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The Loves of Hercules (1960)  -  3/10

220px-Gliamoridiercoleposter.jpg

Italian sword'n'sandal fantasy with Mickey Hargitay as the muscled demi-god Hercules, here seeking revenge for the death of his family. Also with Jayne Mansfield in a dual role, wearing black and red wigs, alternately. This was bad, with a lousy script and poor action scenes. Hercules battles a three-headed dragon that has to be seen to be believed.

Source: internet

lovesofhercules.jpg

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The Mountain Road (1960)  -  6/10

220px-Mountain_Road_Poster.jpg

WWII drama starring Jimmy Stewart as the head of a small detachment of US troops tasked with blowing up supply depots, roads, and bridges in China to hamper the Japanese military advancement. Featuring Lisa Lu as a dead Chinese general's wife being escorted by Stewart and company, Harry Morgan, James Best, Glenn Corbett, Mike Kellin, Frank Silvera, Rudy Bond, Frank Maxwell, Eddie Firestone, and Alan Baxter. This anti-war drama marks a rare appearance in a war film for combat-veteran Stewart. Lisa Lu, who made her movie debut here before going on to a lengthy and successful career in China as well as the US, is still around at age 92, and had a featured role in last year's Crazy Rich Asians

Source: TCM

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The Nun (2018)  -  5/10

TheNunPoster.jpg

Supernatural horror tale that's a prequel/spin-off to one of The Conjuring movies. Priest Demian Bichir and initiate nun Taissa Farmiga are sent by the Vatican to investigate a suicide at a remote abbey in Romania. They discover an ancient evil that was confined long ago, but has recently begun to seep out from the crumbling holy site into the neighboring countryside. Also featuring Jonas Bloquet, Ingrid Bisu, Charlotte Hope, and Bonnie Aarons. I went into this expecting the worst, as I'm not a fan of any of the Conjuring movies that I've seen, so maybe my lowered expectations allowed me to like this a bit more than it deserved. The director (Corin Hardy) has a knack for effective imagery, but the script is a threadbare amalgam of cliches from better movies.

Source: HBO

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The Naked Island (1960)  -  7/10

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Unusual Japanese drama from director Kaneto Shindo. A family of four struggles to survive on a small island, barely making a subsistence living in their harsh environment. Featuring Nobuko Otawa, Taiji Tonoyama, Shinji Tanaka, and Masanori Horimoto. The movie has very little dialogue; just a few snippets of songs and a word here and there are heard. A decent musical score and natural sound effects are used to accent the excellent widescreen, B&W cinematography. The director claimed to be attempting to capture poetry in motion and hard work, and he largely succeeds, but how much you are moved (or bored) by it will be variable. This would make a good double-bill with Man of Aran (1934).

Source: The Criterion Channel

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15 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

I found this banal and uninteresting. There's development late in the film intended to shock, but I didn't care by that point. Many people love this movie, but it did nothing for me.

Wow, unusual comments for you Lawrence-seems like you keep interest through almost anything. I'll seek this one out to see if I agree with "many people" or yourself.

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9 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Naked Island (1960)  -  7/10

MV5BNDk5MDQ5YzktOGJlOS00MWIzLTkxMmYtNmIx

Unusual Japanese drama from director Kaneto Shindo.The movie has very little dialogue; just a few snippets of songs and a word here and there are heard. A decent musical score and natural sound effects are used ....

 

that specifically is why i like Japanese Foreign Films.

I have the damnedest time FOCUSING on things, and I also get headaches, and trying to watch the IMAGES, the faces of the ACTORS and then having to read that (often little white print) is just hard for my tragic, addled mind and I start feeling like BLANCHE DuBOIS and I want to ask someone to run to the drugstore and get me a Lemon Coke.

JAPANESE FILMS are VERY calming and VERY VISUAL (which is great, because I often look away from english language films to do the crossword or suduko or (sorry) me phone to check the news)

I also LOVE the way they do wind and water, which never sounds like cheap foley effects the way it often does in english language (and especially British!) films.

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so i took a bit of a risk and watched....A MODERN MOVIE last night.

(YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN music cue)

hero_oath-image-2018.jpg

It was called THE OATH and it came out in apparently a VERY limited release in 2018, in spite of the fact that it stars TIFFANY HADDISH, who some of you may know as A RECENT HOLLYWOOD "IT" GIRL. The wiki article on it was a stub, and- even though it showed up in my Hulu feed that morning, when I went to watch it that evening, I had to search for it because i couldn't find it.

COINCIDENCE....?

(X-FILES music cue)

it was (well) directed and written by IKE BARINHOLTZ- aka "The Cute One" from MadTV- the premise is that a Los Angeles executive (and aggressive Liberal) played by BARINHOLTZ and his wife (HADDISH) are hosting his politically diverse family FOR thanksgiving, meanwhile The (unnamed) President of the United States in connection with The Department of Homeland Security has issued an Oath to pledge loyalty to the country and the President and it is to be signed (or not) by all Americans by BLACK FRIDAY. (you can do it online!)

[I would show the trailer to give you guys an idea, but it has some [delightfully] FOUL language in it]

things get COMPLETELY NUTS and even though the film is often funny- it is MUCH CLOSER to unsettling laughter from the absurdly horrific nature of things GOING REEEEALLY WRONG- very much in the same vein as the recent work of BARINHOLTZ's MADTV alum JORDAN PEELE.

I liked it, and even though the ending is somewhat unsatisfying and there are some holes in the script, I still appreciate the fact that the film brings up and explores the issues that it does and to the degree that it does.

I tend to not like DYSTOPIAN FICTION OF LATE because it only scrapes the surface of the effing CLOWN CAR the world has become, but this was solid. I also got my ADRENALINE PUMPING more than any movie in recent memory.

it is unsettling to say THE LEAST.

I also have to say that HADDISH was a revelation for me- I know she had an onstage meltdown ca. New Years Eve 2019, hope she's doing okay- she really was Oscar-level good, grounded the movie completely; was 100% the Heart and Soul of the piece. A. Natural. Actress.

this is not an easy movie to watch, and i admit that i turned it off twice, but i went back to it, and I'm glad I did.

There's a good chance this movie will undergo a MIKE JUDGE style resurrection/reevaluation in a couple years...or in the (let's face it) very real possibility that it becomes a reality in oh...Hell, let's just  say sometime in the next 16 months.

 

 

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