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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

It was called THE OATH and it came out in apparently a VERY limited release in 2018, in spite of the fact that it stars TIFFANY HADDISH,

I don't recall even hearing about this one before your write-up, and I keep up with the newer films, too. I've seen Tiffany Haddish in a few things. She was good in the Key & Peele movie Keanu, and she was one of the better Saturday Night Live hosts in the past few years. I haven't seen Girls Trip, which was her big breakthrough.

I also didn't know Ike Barinholtz was from MadTV, but I confess to not being too knowledgeable about their cast history. I never really liked the show as much as SNL or the other sketch shows. I've liked Barinholtz in a handful of movies that I've seen recently, though.

Thanks for the write-up, as the movie's now on my radar.

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Never Let Go (1960)  -  7/10

Never_Let_Go_(1960_film).jpg

British crime drama starring Richard Todd as a working-class salesman who's barely holding on to his position in a competitive job market. His situation is made more dire when his recently-purchased car is stolen, so he goes searching for it, bringing him to the attention of violent crime boss Peter Sellers. Also featuring Elizabeth Sellars as Todd's worried wife, and Adam Faith as the leader of the youthful gang employed by Sellers. With Carol White, Mervyn Johns, Noel Willman, David Lodge, Peter Jones, John Bailey, Nigel Stock, and John Le Mesurier. Sellers has one of his only non-comedy roles, and he's effective, if unnerving, as the quick-tempered and very violent underworld figure. Todd is also good as the desperate working man on the edge of losing his career, his marriage and his family.

Source: VCI DVD

 

51I9nzkaUCL.jpg

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Never Let Go (1960)  -  7/10

Never_Let_Go_(1960_film).jpg

British crime drama starring Richard Todd as a working-class salesman who's barely holding on to his position in a competitive job market. His situation is made more dire when his recently-purchased car is stolen, so he goes searching for it, bringing him to the attention of violent crime boss Peter Sellers. Also featuring Elizabeth Sellars as Todd's worried wife, and Adam Faith as the leader of the youthful gang employed by Sellers. With Carol White, Mervyn Johns, Noel Willman, David Lodge, Peter Jones, John Bailey, Nigel Stock, and John Le Mesurier. Sellers has one of his only non-comedy roles, and he's effective, if unnerving, as the quick-tempered and very violent underworld figure. Todd is also good as the desperate working man on the edge of losing his career, his marriage and his family.

Source: VCI DVD

 

51I9nzkaUCL.jpg

A fave Brit Noir I love how Sellers rages on about the "little nob, lipstick salesman," and how he's going to "kill him, put him in his car, and burn it!"

 

😎

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Never Take Candy from a Stranger (1960)  -  7/10

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Hammer Films drama set in Canada about an English family who have arrived in a small town so that the father (Patrick Allen) can be the new principal at the local high school. Soon after settling in, their young daughter (Janina Faye) is sexually molested by an old man (Felix Aylmer) from the town's richest and most powerful family. When the father seeks justice, he learns that not only is there a history of such incidents committed by the old man, but that the townsfolk look the other way due to the old man's influence. Featuring Bill Nagy, Allison Legatt, Michael Gwynn, Budd Knapp, Frances Green, and Niall MacGinnis. This is shocking material for the time, and it's presented as frankly as was possible. It's disturbing, and the subsequent legal shenanigans will infuriate most viewers, as intended. 

Source: Mill Creek DVD

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I think you're a year away from Stuart Whitman in The Mark, another interesting movie about a child molester, although this one is trying to put his life back together.

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Pay or Die! (1960)  -  7/10

220px-Payordiepos.jpg

True-story crime drama with Ernest Borgnine as NYPD Lt. Joseph Petrosino, who battled the Black Hand, the precursor to the Mafia, circa 1906-1909. Petrosino has to convince the terrified Italian-American community to testify against the extortionists and racketeers, while also using undercover officers and other innovative crime-fighting techniques. Also featuring Zohra Lampert, Alan Austin, Renata Vanni, Bruno Della Santina, Robert F. Simon, Robert Ellenstein, Vitto Scotti, Paul Birch, and John Marley. I don't recall having heard of Petrosino, but after reading up a little on him, he seems like a fascinating character. Borgnine is good in the role, even if the real guy was 5'3''. Supposedly Leonardo DiCaprio is attached to a new screen biopic on Petrosino.

Source: TCM

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PERMANENT (2017) *Score: 5/10* 

Starring: Rainn Wilson, Patricia Arquette, Kira McLean, Brian Bremer. 

This film takes place in the year 1982, and centers around a family of 3: Jim (Wilson), his wife Jeanne (Arquette), and their daughter, Aurelie (McLean), who have just moved to a new town. The film is aptly named, as Aurelie's main goal is to get a perm so she can fit in with the other girls at her new school. The perm is done by someone with little to no experience with the process, so Aurelie's hair ends up completely ruined. While Aurelie is having her own problems, her parents are going through a bit of a rough patch themselves: Jim is afraid to put himself out there, and Jeanne wants Jim to pay more romantic attention to her. 

It took me a few tries to actually finish this one. It was okay, nothing to write home about. I've been on a kind of Patricia Arquette kick lately, so maybe that's why. 

Image result for permanent 2017

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Pepe (1960)  -  5/10

220px-Pepe_movie_poster.jpg

Unforgivably bloated musical comedy starring Cantiflas as Pepe, a simple Mexican stable hand who loses his prize horse to washed-up American film director Dan Dailey. Pepe follows them back to Hollywood, where he meets aspiring dancer Debbie Reynolds, who Pepe tries to help get into pictures. The film's main draw is a parade of big-name cameos. I won't list them all, as many are meant to be surprises, but I watched it specifically for Edward G. Robinson, Frank Sinatra (along with the rest of the Rat Pack), and Jack Lemmon, who appears in his Some Like It Hot drag outfit. This also marks the final film appearances of Donna Reed, Billie Burke, and Charles Coburn. The version I watched was 158 minutes long, but the originally screened cut ran 195 minutes! The movie was a massive flop, but still garnered seven Oscar nominations, for Best Art Direction, Best Cinematography, Best Costumes, Best Editing (HaHahaha), Best Sound, Best Score, and Best Song ("Faraway Part of Town").

Source: TCM

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12 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Pepe (1960)  -  5/10

Unforgivably bloated musical comedy starring Cantiflas as Pepe, a simple Mexican stable hand who loses his prize horse to washed-up American film director Dan Dailey. Pepe follows them back to Hollywood, where he meets aspiring dancer Debbie Reynolds, who Pepe tries to help get into pictures. The film's main draw is a parade of big-name cameos. I won't list them all, as many are meant to be surprises, but I watched it specifically for Edward G. Robinson, Frank Sinatra (along with the rest of the Rat Pack), and Jack Lemmon, who appears in his Some Like It Hot drag outfit. This also marks the final film appearances of Donna Reed, Billie Burke, and Charles Coburn. The version I watched was 158 minutes long, but the originally screened cut ran 195 minutes! The movie was a massive flop, but still garnered seven Oscar nominations, for Best Art Direction, Best Cinematography, Best Costumes, Best Editing (HaHahaha), Best Sound, Best Score, and Best Song ("Faraway Part of Town").

It was deliberately trying to make Around the World in 80 Days's lightning strike again in an artificial Graff generator, by using the "secret ingredient", but didn't work--Guess there were a few more secret ingredients than just throwing some celebrity cameos around him and filming the scenery with a Cinerama camera.

While Cantinflas is talented in his own country, it's a different sense of humor than we gringos get up north.  He's not exactly David Niven.

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The Silence (2019)  -  5/10

The_Silence_(2019_film_poster).png

Apocalyptic horror based on a novel by Tim Lebbon. A species of carnivorous, bat-like creatures are unleashed from a massive cave system. They are blind, and drawn to any sound, and they also breed like rabbits, so soon scores of them are decimating cities in the northeast. The film follows one family's efforts to survive as the creatures devour most of the people and society collapses. Starring Stanley Tucci as the dad, Miranda Otto as the mom, Kiernan Shipka as the deaf daughter, Kate Trotter, Kyle Breitkopf, Dempsey Bryk, Billy MacLellan, and John Corbett. This is a cheaper, less effective variation on last year's A Quiet Place and Birdbox. Tucci and Shipka are both good, but there isn't much more than cursory character development, and the scenarios are too routine to bring much excitement. The creatures themselves are pretty silly looking, which undercuts the fear factor a great deal. 

Source: Netflix

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Samson (1961)  -  6/10

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Italian muscle-man adventure with Brad Harris as the hero Samson, who tries to help a deposed queen (Irena Prosen) regain her throne from usurper Romilda (Mara Berni) and her dastardly ally Warkalla (Serge Gainsbourg). Samson finds an ally in fellow slab-of-beefcake Millstone (Alan Steel). With Brigitte Corey, Carlo Tamberlani, Franco Gasparri, and Vladimir Leib. This marked one of American Brad Harris' first starring roles in a peplum, a genre that he would appear in frequently, as would co-star Alan (Sergio Ciani) Steel, who began as Steve Reeves' body double before playing mythic heroes on his own. The dubbing in this one is hilariously awful, but it has the impressive sets expected in the genre, and some fun action sequences.

Source: YouTube

bh_samson.jpg

 

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Ed. note- my phone died last week, so i'm not able to post right after seeing a movie and have to recount to you the details the next day and my memory is NOTORIOUSLY SPOTTY, SO all apologies if I just RASHOMAN the Hell out of this one.

Also also, I can't review this one without giving away something kind of surprising that happens halfway through- so, spoilers kinda- although, I mean- THE TITLE KINDA LETS YOU IN ON WHAT TO EXPECT

divorcelobby07.jpgKay can work a hankie!

I went on a lark and watched DIVORCE (1945- MONOGRAM) With KAY FRANCIS as a WICKED ,multiple-divorcee who returns to her small town and wrecks the marriage of BRUCE CABOT and his wife. 

those of you who know the KAY FRANCIS story know that she was A HUGE STAR in the 30's who made a string of GLAMOROUS WOMEN'S "SUFFERING IN SATIN" PICS- she asked for a raise and WARNER'S punished her for it, ruining her career. she had a tragic time of it in the 40's, dealing with some substance issues and a horrific burn injury. I saw NONE OF THIS in her performance or her face- SHE LOOKED INCREDIBLE, and- as always- the fashions were about 98% of the film's shooting budget (and I hope KAY made off with a mink or two)

this was a B-movie at a B-Studio though, and (wardrobe aside)- almost everything about it is pretty Dollar General- including the script, which- to be honest- is what makes it so amusing.

for some reason- it seems quite apparent- that this one came in "under" the time to be considered a feature and needed some padding, so it starts with two BIZARRE vignettes where a JUDGE (in a suit, no robe) presides over a divorce court and in classic B-MOVIE JUDGE TRADITION, he takes the chance to berate and chastise all involved in the case for being such horrible failures as human beings (see also I ACCUSE MY PARENTS!)

AS I RECALL- the first case is of a woman who claims her husband abuses her and then she lists the reasons and they're all petty as Hell. The judge suggests the woman be flogged, takes of his shoe and hits her with it (ed note: again, as i recall it; i also took a muscle relaxer before going to bed, so grain of salt here)

the second case is a guy who claims his wife abuses him, THE WIFE IS NOT PRESENT IN THE COURTROOM AND THE JUDGE TOTALLY SIDES WITH THE GUY, but not before of course, extensively berating him for his failures as a Man.

then on to the plot, which is about small town real estate guy BRUCE CABOT and his two terminally adorable children that he has with his wife- who was played adequately by an actress i did not recognize.

his ex-girlfriend KAY FRANCIS moves back to town (she is also the absent abusive JEZEBEL wife referred to in the second vignette it turns out) they meet at a party, and she throws some business his way.

then there is AN UTTERLY DELICIOUS SCENE where KAY- in a FULL LENGTH MINK WITH 36 INCH SHOULDER PADS- marches right into their home, comes up to the wife and is all "HE'S MINE NOW, ***** DEAL WITH IT" and the wife turns to the husband and he's all "YUP 100%. I'M WHIPPED and WE DONE" (that's the ONE surprise, at least it was to me) and then KAY takes him by the arm, laughs like THE COUNT from SESAME STREET, there is a lightning bolt and a crash of thunder and off they go TOGETHER.

then we're back in ROY BEAN'S DIVORCE COURT, where the (same) judge (even though KAY's divorce happened in another town)- IN A HIGHLY ETHICAL AND TOTALLY LEGAL MOVE- asks the husband and wife for a private conference in his office where he orders them to get back together and they're all "nuh-uh" and he (shock!) CASTIGATES THEM and grants them a divorce and then THE IDIOT WIFE REFUSES ALIMONY which ARE YOU ****ING KIDDING ME WITH THIS?

She supports the kids by working in a dress shop (they have to let the black maid go, but Thank God they keep the Irish Stereotype Governess) while the husband balls it up with KAY and THEN FORGETS ABOUT THE FAMILY ENTIRELY!

This was a highly entertaining movie with a seriously cornball third act. As bad as the dialogue is, KAY plows through it like she's back working with LUBITSCH- silly as the part is, she gives it her IN NAME ONLY best and she looks, at times, like a cobra ready to pounce.

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Thanks for the entertaining post about "Divorce" LHF (you've done it again!).  What I thought was cool about it was the town Kay Francis is returning to is the same town where I live, not some fictitious made-up place!  One thing about Kay Francis is she must have been fun to work with in the wardrobe department.  I mean, she could look glamorous wearing just sack cloth and ashes.  That shimmering number she wore in "Mandalay" when she made her first appearance at Nick's nightclub as 'Spot White' was amazing and probably wouldn't have looked as stunning if the film were shot in technicolor.  

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16 minutes ago, midwestan said:

Thanks for the entertaining post about "Divorce" LHF (you've done it again!).  What I thought was cool about it was the town Kay Francis is returning to is the same town where I live, not some fictitious made-up place!  One thing about Kay Francis is she must have been fun to work with in the wardrobe department.  I mean, she could look glamorous wearing just sack cloth and ashes.  That shimmering number she wore in "Mandalay" when she made her first appearance at Nick's nightclub as 'Spot White' was amazing and probably wouldn't have looked as stunning if the film were shot in technicolor.  

I always imagine the wardrobe fittings for ANY KAY FRANCIS FILM to be like the RAINBOW HIGH number from EVITA...right down to Kay singing in front of a trio of full-length mirrors: "All my descamisados except me to outshine the enemy, I WON'T DISAPPOINT THEM!!!!!"

ps- I'm forgetting what town DIVORCE was set in, but do have a vague recollection of their mentioning it in the story (again, my memory not known for high accuracy) What was it?

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Waterfront (1944)

PRC "B" programmer of the war years.

J. Carol Naish is a German agent working as an optometrist on the Frisco waterfront. At the beginning of the film he gets robbed on the streets, the thief taking his little black book which is not only a code book for secret messages but lists all the German agents in North America. John Carradine is another German agent arriving on the scene who wants a message decoded. The hunt is on for that book.

A routine story and mundane direction, combined with the usual sparse production values for a PRC product, makes this a fairly forgettable time waster. Typical for so many of these "B"s, the "young lovers" in this film are played by a pair of bland actors with which few, if any, film buffs today are familiar. I could list their names but I don't have the interest in looking them up and you wouldn't recognize them, anyway.

The expectedly professional performances of Carradine, as a cold blooded agent who seems ready to resolve most conflicts with a gun, and Naish, as a cultured, erudite spy, are the film's primary interests.

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2 out of 4

 

This reminds me that I recently saw an old video tape interview done with John Carradine in his home about five years prior his death. He still referred to himself as, on the verge of his 77th birthday, a "working actor" though said that most young film producers wouldn't know much about his track record. His true love as an actor, he said, was working on the stage.

The interviewer, however, while polite, was interested only in Carradine's horror features. Carradine was openly dismissive of his horror films, saying that only 25 of his 400 films fell into that category, and it was the least important part of his career. He said this a couple of times during the interview. He did say kind things about Karloff, Lugosi and Atwill as first rate actors and professionals with whom it was a pleasure to work, and also said he enjoyed working in horror films, though, to him, it was still just another assignment.

But almost anytime Carradine started to veer away from the conversation about horror films with a reference to Captains Courageous or The Grapes of Wrath or his stage work, the interviewer, after a brief polite pause, would then ask a question like "So what was your favourite horror film?" It must have been a bit frustrating for Carradine who clearly would have preferred to talk about other aspects of his long career but was stuck this day talking with a horror geek.

I also found it rather poignant that above the couch where Carradine sat in his living room was a giant portrait of himself from his days as a Shakespearean actor. He looks distinguished and downright handsome in the painting. The actor obviously took great pride in it and undoubtedly regarded that period as one of the real peaks in a career that had a lot of valleys.

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22 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I always imagine the wardrobe fittings for ANY KAY FRANCIS FILM to be like the RAINBOW HIGH number from EVITA...right down to Kay singing in front of a trio of full-length mirrors: "All my descamisados except me to outshine the enemy, I WON'T DISAPPOINT THEM!!!!!"

ps- I'm forgetting what town DIVORCE was set in, but do have a vague recollection of their mentioning it in the story (again, my memory not known for high accuracy) What was it?

Hillsboro, Ill. (about halfway between Springfield, Ill. and St. Louis, Mo.)

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I saw "Fast Company" Wednesday night as part of TCM's 'amateur sleuths' salute.  This 1938 MGM offering starred Florence Rice and Melvyn Douglas as a husband and wife team involved with collecting and selling rare books, but it seems they make most of their scratch from recovering stolen literary works and recouping the reward money from insurance companies.  It was an interesting premise for a detective/crime story.

Eddie Muller provided the wrap-arounds for Wednesday's prime time pictures and said the wild success of "The Thin Man" series convinced MGM to make a series based off the characters of Joel and Garda Sloane (the hubby and missus).  It was the first time I had seen "Fast Company", and I thoroughly enjoyed it!  The supporting cast was chock full of familiar faces.  I also thought the repartee between Douglas and Rice in this film was in some ways superior to Myrna Loy and William Powell in 'The Thin Man' series (which I love).  There were two more films made with the Sloanes as amateur sleuths, and both of them featured different actors and actresses in the lead roles.

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Ed. note- my phone died last week, so i'm not able to post right after seeing a movie and have to recount to you the details the next day and my memory is NOTORIOUSLY SPOTTY, SO all apologies if I just RASHOMAN the Hell out of this one.

Also also, I can't review this one without giving away something kind of surprising that happens halfway through- so, spoilers kinda- although, I mean- THE TITLE KINDA LETS YOU IN ON WHAT TO EXPECT

divorcelobby07.jpgKay can work a hankie!

I went on a lark and watched DIVORCE (1945- MONOGRAM) With KAY FRANCIS as a WICKED ,multiple-divorcee who returns to her small town and wrecks the marriage of BRUCE CABOT and his wife. 

those of you who know the KAY FRANCIS story know that she was A HUGE STAR in the 30's who made a string of GLAMOROUS WOMEN'S "SUFFERING IN SATIN" PICS- she asked for a raise and WARNER'S punished her for it, ruining her career. she had a tragic time of it in the 40's, dealing with some substance issues and a horrific burn injury. I saw NONE OF THIS in her performance or her face- SHE LOOKED INCREDIBLE, and- as always- the fashions were about 98% of the film's shooting budget (and I hope KAY made off with a mink or two)

this was a B-movie at a B-Studio though, and (wardrobe aside)- almost everything about it is pretty Dollar General- including the script, which- to be honest- is what makes it so amusing.

for some reason- it seems quite apparent- that this one came in "under" the time to be considered a feature and needed some padding, so it starts with two BIZARRE vignettes where a JUDGE (in a suit, no robe) presides over a divorce court and in classic B-MOVIE JUDGE TRADITION, he takes the chance to berate and chastise all involved in the case for being such horrible failures as human beings (see also I ACCUSE MY PARENTS!)

AS I RECALL- the first case is of a woman who claims her husband abuses her and then she lists the reasons and they're all petty as Hell. The judge suggests the woman be flogged, takes of his shoe and hits her with it (ed note: again, as i recall it; i also took a muscle relaxer before going to bed, so grain of salt here)

the second case is a guy who claims his wife abuses him, THE WIFE IS NOT PRESENT IN THE COURTROOM AND THE JUDGE TOTALLY SIDES WITH THE GUY, but not before of course, extensively berating him for his failures as a Man.

then on to the plot, which is about small town real estate guy BRUCE CABOT and his two terminally adorable children that he has with his wife- who was played adequately by an actress i did not recognize.

his ex-girlfriend KAY FRANCIS moves back to town (she is also the absent abusive JEZEBEL wife referred to in the second vignette it turns out) they meet at a party, and she throws some business his way.

then there is AN UTTERLY DELICIOUS SCENE where KAY- in a FULL LENGTH MINK WITH 36 INCH SHOULDER PADS- marches right into their home, comes up to the wife and is all "HE'S MINE NOW, ***** DEAL WITH IT" and the wife turns to the husband and he's all "YUP 100%. I'M WHIPPED and WE DONE" (that's the ONE surprise, at least it was to me) and then KAY takes him by the arm, laughs like THE COUNT from SESAME STREET, there is a lightning bolt and a crash of thunder and off they go TOGETHER.

then we're back in ROY BEAN'S DIVORCE COURT, where the (same) judge (even though KAY's divorce happened in another town)- IN A HIGHLY ETHICAL AND TOTALLY LEGAL MOVE- asks the husband and wife for a private conference in his office where he orders them to get back together and they're all "nuh-uh" and he (shock!) CASTIGATES THEM and grants them a divorce and then THE IDIOT WIFE REFUSES ALIMONY which ARE YOU ****ING KIDDING ME WITH THIS?

She supports the kids by working in a dress shop (they have to let the black maid go, but Thank God they keep the Irish Stereotype Governess) while the husband balls it up with KAY and THEN FORGETS ABOUT THE FAMILY ENTIRELY!

This was a highly entertaining movie with a seriously cornball third act. As bad as the dialogue is, KAY plows through it like she's back working with LUBITSCH- silly as the part is, she gives it her IN NAME ONLY best and she looks, at times, like a cobra ready to pounce.

 

Looking forward to catching Divorce this wknd (among the 5 Kay films I recorded that day) I'm not expecting much, but it sounds amusing and I love B movies!

It wasnt that Kay demanded a raise, it was in her contract. At her peak at Warners she was making 5,000/week. Cheap Warners wanted her to quit, so they stuck her in Bs. But to their consternation, she continued to work until her contract ran out. Kay may have won the money war, but I think it would have been better had she quit as all those B movies contributed to exhibitors declaring her Box Office Poison along with some other stars in the late 30s.

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2 hours ago, midwestan said:

Thanks for the entertaining post about "Divorce" LHF (you've done it again!).  What I thought was cool about it was the town Kay Francis is returning to is the same town where I live, not some fictitious made-up place!  One thing about Kay Francis is she must have been fun to work with in the wardrobe department.  I mean, she could look glamorous wearing just sack cloth and ashes.  That shimmering number she wore in "Mandalay" when she made her first appearance at Nick's nightclub as 'Spot White' was amazing and probably wouldn't have looked as stunning if the film were shot in technicolor.  

Yeah, that dress! Orry-Kelly really delivered with Kay on the screen. I read the dress was so tight, Kay tripped and fell on the stairs in that scene...

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

 

Looking forward to catching Divorce this wknd (among the 5 Kay films I recorded that day) I'm not expecting much, but it sounds amusing and I love B movies!

It wasnt that Kay demanded a raise, it was in her contract. At her peak at Warners she was making 5,000/week. Cheap Warners wanted her to quit, so they stuck her in Bs. But to their consternation, she continued to work until her contract ran out. Kay may have won the money war, but I think it would have been better had she quit as all those B movies contributed to exhibitors declaring her Box Office Poison along with some other stars in the late 30s.

That's right; I'm sorry.

You know me, always half-remembering the whole story....

ps- I actually like the one where she plays a Doctor to Bogart's gangster....

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3 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

That's right; I'm sorry.

You know me, always half-remembering the whole story....

ps- I actually like the one where she plays a Doctor to Bogart's gangster....

Yeah, that B wasn't bad! (King of the Underworld) I liked it better than the original, Dr. Socrates.

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

It wasnt that Kay demanded a raise, it was in her contract. At her peak at Warners she was making 5,000/week. Cheap Warners wanted her to quit, so they stuck her in Bs. But to their consternation, she continued to work until her contract ran out. Kay may have won the money war, but I think it would have been better had she quit as all those B movies contributed to exhibitors declaring her Box Office Poison along with some other stars in the late 30s.

Yes,  WB signed Kay to a very high weekly contract as a way to lure her from MGM.   When her box office appeal started to fade Jack wanted her to quit,  to void the contract,  but he didn't stick her in 'Bs' for that reason.   She was put into 'Bs' because of the box office take from prior films.  

What Jack did do was make her show up at the studio each day and stay the entire day,  even when she had no film assignments.   She was assigned to train younger actresses.   Jack hoped this would force her out but she stayed and continued to earn her 5K a week  (rightfully so!).

Hard for me to say that if she would have quit WB and freelanced if that would have revised her career.  Note that many of the leading actresses of the early and mid 30s also suffered career declines,  due to changes in audience taste,  up-and-coming younger actresses,  and general 'oh you're over 35 now' concerns by suits.

 

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