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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Yes,  WB signed Kay to a very high weekly contract as a way to lure her from MGM.   When her box office appeal started to fade Jack wanted her to quit,  to void the contract,  but he didn't stick her in 'Bs' for that reason.   She was put into 'Bs' because of the box office take from prior films.  

What Jack did do was make her show up at the studio each day and stay the entire day,  even when she had no film assignments.   She was assigned to train younger actresses.   Jack hoped this would force her out but she stayed and continued to earn her 5K a week  (rightfully so!).

Hard for me to say that if she would have quit WB and freelanced if that would have revised her career.  Note that many of the leading actresses of the early and mid 30s also suffered career declines,  due to changes in audience taste,  up-and-coming younger actresses,  and general 'oh you're over 35 now' concerns by suits.

 

Yes, that is true. It was all part of his scheme to humiliate her so she'd quit. Putting her in Bs (and even announcing it in the trades) was part of the humiliation. He felt she wasnt worth the high salary she was getting. Her appeal HAD slipped some, but that was more due to the vehicles she was given. With a good script like Confession she proved she still had it. But good scripts from the mid 30s on were few and far between with her at WB.

It is hard to say had she quit if her career would have picked up. But at least she could have chosen her projects. Or possibly signed on somewhere else at a lower salary.

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Please Don't Eat the Daisies (1960)  -  5/10

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Bland domestic comedy with Doris Day married to drama critic David Niven. They face various personal and professional dilemmas of a largely mundane nature. With Janis Paige, Spring Byington, Stanley Livingstone, Charles Herbert, Richard Haydn, Patsy Kelly, Jack Weston, and Margaret Lindsay. I can't call this a bad movie, but it never really got started, and I don't think I even cracked a smile, let alone laughed.

Source: TCM

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10 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Please Don't Eat the Daisies (1960)  -  5/10

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Bland domestic comedy with Doris Day married to drama critic David Niven. They face various personal and professional dilemmas of a largely mundane nature. With Janis Paige, Spring Byington, Stanley Livingstone, Charles Herbert, Richard Haydn, Patsy Kelly, Jack Weston, and Margaret Lindsay. I can't call this a bad movie, but it never really got started, and I don't think I even cracked a smile, let alone laughed.

Source: TCM

Janis Paige is very hot, as well as stylish, in this film and steals every scene she's in. I find her far sexier in this comedy than when she was a younger actress first starting off at Warners.

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRki32osDajWxm59O-eze8

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2 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Janis Paige is very hot, as well as stylish, in this film and steals every scene she's in. I find her far sexier in this comedy than when she was a younger actress first starting off at Warners.

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AGREE. She's very funny. She had a musical number too, but it was cut. (when her show opens).

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I assume The Ex-Mrs. Bradford was on too late for the east coast folks,  but I watched it.   I have seen this William Powell \ Jean Arthur films many times but this was first for my wife.     

She loves the Powell \ Loy pairing (and we just watched After The Thin Man),  but Powell and Arthur had good chemistry.   She loved the gowns Arthur wore in the film as well as Arthur cracks toward her ex (who she clearly was still in love with).

Also saw Fast Company for the first time with Melvin Douglas and Florence Rice.    Rice was a surprise to me.  Yea, I assume I had seen her in other MGM films before,  but this time she made a good impression on me.   Like many of these amateur detective films they are mostly comedy films but there is a gruesome side,  where murder and violence are treated like everyday events.    Louis Calhern gives the most compelling performance in the film (but that is often the case).   

Eddie's intos were solid for all the films.

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13 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I like Paige as a brunette more so than a blonde.   Paige is still around;  this is another actor TCM could have on as a guest to talk about 'old' Hollywood.

Image result for janis paige

YEP. Another missed opportunity.

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2 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

 

Hard for me to say that if she would have quit WB and freelanced if that would have revised her career.  Note that many of the leading actresses of the early and mid 30s also suffered career declines,  due to changes in audience taste,  up-and-coming younger actresses,  and general 'oh you're over 35 now' concerns by suits.

 

What's strange about the case of Kay Francis vs. other actresses is that many actresses continued acting in major films in their mid 30s. Claudette Colbert and Myrna Loy both had excellent roles in the 1940s, usually as mothers, but still attractive and in strong films (Since You Went Away, The Best Years of Our Lives).   Jean Arthur was born in 1900, so 39 when she was in Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, in her early 40s (but convincingly playing much younger) in The More the Merrier and Talk of the Town.  Irene Dunne, born in 1898, was therefore in her 40s when she was in My Favorite Wife, A Guy Named Joe, and White Cliffs of Dover.  Barbara Stanwyck was in her mid-30s in the 1940s when she made Double Indemnity  and The Strange Loves of Martha Ivers.   Why did these women who were in their mid 30s or even 40s get top roles?  Perhaps it could be because they were "independent agents," rather than contract players tied to a studio, as Kay was.     Also, Warner's was known for treating its actresses like crap, as Bette Davis and Olivia deHavilland attested.  Case in point -- Greer Garson, one year older than Kay Francis, whose career was just getting off the ground at MGM at the time that Kay was being put out to pasture.  

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Kay was only 40ish when her film career ended with her Monogram Trilogy. She continued to appear on the stage, touring and in stock, until the early 50s.

Bette Davis didnt have an easy road either after leaving WB and she was only 40. Aside from AAE and a few others films the 50s were mostly miss for her. It's odd how some actresses can surmount the age issue for some time while others have a harder time with it. It isnt just talent.

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Portrait in Black (1960)  -  6/10

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Melodrama with Lana Turner as the trophy wife of miserable shipping magnate Lloyd Nolan. Lana has an affair with Lloyd's doctor (Anthony Quinn), and the duo knock off Lloyd so that they can be together. But then they start getting blackmail letters and the tension mounts... Also with Sandra Dee, John Saxon, Richard Basehart, Ray Walston, Virginia Grey, Paul Birch, and Anna May Wong. This is essentially another soaper, but the murder-suspense elements are accentuated. It's often presented in an over-the-top manner, with florid performances and big musical stings on the score. I found it mildly entertaining, and enjoyed the cast. This would be the final film for Anna May Wong, who would pass the following year. This was also my 100th Anthony Quinn movie.

Source: internet

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22 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Portrait in Black (1960)  -  6/10

220px-Portrait_in_Black_1960.jpg

Melodrama with Lana Turner as the trophy wife of miserable shipping magnate Lloyd Nolan. Lana has an affair with Lloyd's doctor (Anthony Quinn), and the duo knock off Lloyd so that they can be together. But then they start getting blackmail letters and the tension mounts... Also with Sandra Dee, John Saxon, Richard Basehart, Ray Walston, Virginia Grey, Paul Birch, and Anna May Wong. This is essentially another soaper, but the murder-suspense elements are accentuated. It's often presented in an over-the-top manner, with florid performances and big musical stings on the score. I found it mildly entertaining, and enjoyed the cast. This would be the final film for Anna May Wong, who would pass the following year. This was also my 100th Anthony Quinn movie.

Source: internet

This movie is SO BAD. But if one is in the mood for an overheated, badly plotted soap opera/murder it's hard to look away. Quinn playing this doctor is particularly ridiculous. The plot and cast remind me a lot of Midnight Lace. Glamorous, suffering ladies, (though Doris is more innocent than Lana). Ross Hunter dreck. The finale is hilarious.

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Primary (1960)  -  7/10

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Brief, one-hour documentary covering the Wisconsin Democratic primary for president. Filmmaker Robert Drew and his crew (including such documentary film notables as D.A. Pennebaker, Richard Leacock, and Albert Maysles) follow top candidates Senator John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts and Senator Hubert Humphrey of Minnesota. We see the candidates press the flesh and make speeches at various venues around the state, and finally the election night drama. This may be a bit too dry for many viewers, but from a historical perspective, the film is priceless.

Source: TCM

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The Private Lives of Adam and Eve (1960)  -  3/10

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Another dose of insipid lunacy from producer-director Albert Zugsmith. A group of people on a bus, including a couple having marital problems (Mamie Van Doren & Martin Milner), another couple having marital problems (Mickey Rooney & Fay Spain), a runaway teen (Tuesday Weld), a traveling salesman (Mel Torme), a hot-rodding musician (Paul Anka), and the bus driver (Cecil Kellaway), are caught up in a torrential flood, causing them to seek shelter in church. Then the story shifts to a comedic retelling of the Adam & Eve story, with Milner & Van Doren as the first couple, Fay Spain as temptress Lilith, and Mickey Rooney as Satan! Also with June Wilkinson and Ziva Rodann. Rooney gets a co-director credit on this bizarre mash-up of soap opera, cheesecake and sub-moronic humor. 

Source: internet

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Private Property (1960)  -  7/10

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Psychological thriller starring Corey Allen and Warren Oates as a pair of drifters who follow a California housewife (Kate Manx) home, taking up residence in the abandoned house next door. They spy on her and her husband (Robert Wark), while Allen begins approaching Manx, claiming to be looking for work, and gradually wearing down her defenses. Also featuring Jerome Cowan and Jules Maitland. This was written and directed by Leslie Stevens, who would go on to create The Outer Limits. He cast his real-life wife in the lead role. She does a pretty good job, and looks even better. Sadly, she and Stevens divorced in 1964, and Manx took her own life shortly afterward. The cinematography is striking, with Conrad Hall credited as camera operator. This is an unusual film for the time, well-made on a limited budget, with Allen  & Oates both excelling as the enigmatic creeps.

Source: TCM

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9 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Private Property (1960)  -  7/10

220px-Private_property_poster.jpg

Psychological thriller starring Corey Allen and Warren Oates as a pair of drifters who follow a California housewife (Kate Manx) home, taking up residence in the abandoned house next door. They spy on her and her husband (Robert Wark), while Allen begins approaching Manx, claiming to be looking for work, and gradually wearing down her defenses. Also featuring Jerome Cowan and Jules Maitland. This was written and directed by Leslie Stevens, who would go on to create The Outer Limits. He cast his real-life wife in the lead role. She does a pretty good job, and looks even better. Sadly, she and Stevens divorced in 1964, and Manx took her own life shortly afterward. The cinematography is striking, with Conrad Hall credited as camera operator. This is an unusual film for the time, well-made on a limited budget, with Allen  & Oates both excelling as the enigmatic creeps.

Source: TCM

I enjoyed it also.

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I've been enjoying the amateur sleuth series, I rewatched THE KENNEL MURDER CASE and whichcever NANCY DREW movie it is where NED has to dress up like a female NURSE with a cloak and everything to help an old lady break out of the sanitarium.

(oh Nancy, share with me your secret to enslaving a man and bending his will to your every whim. Sorceress.)

I saw MR AND MRS NORTH for the first time, which starred GRACIE ALLEN as pretty much herself. it's an odd movie where she and her husband (who is not played by GEORGE BURNS but some guy who looks like a puffy, irritable** DAVID MANNERS) find a dead body in their PARK AVENUE APARTMENT closet. Hijinks ensue, GRACIE is pretty funny and- in a GOSFORD PARK level twist on the classic denoument- solves the crime at the end completely by accident when she berates all the gathered suspects for their rude manners and all is revealed 100% without the assistance of as much as even one little grey cell firing off to another.

i'm not entirely sure why GEORGE BURNS wasn't in the husband part, but in a way, it adds to the suspense because- not giving anything away here- this one will keep you guessing to the end largely because the husband turns out to genuinely be one of the suspects....

 

**to be fair though, living with GRACIE would make anyone a little short tempered.

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13 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Private Lives of Adam and Eve (1960)  -  3/10

220px-Privatelivesadameve.JPG

Another dose of insipid lunacy from producer-director Albert Zugsmith. A group of people on a bus, including a couple having marital problems (Mamie Van Doren & Martin Milner), another couple having marital problems (Mickey Rooney & Fay Spain), a runaway teen (Tuesday Weld), a traveling salesman (Mel Torme), a hot-rodding musician (Paul Anka), and the bus driver (Cecil Kellaway), are caught up in a torrential flood, causing them to seek shelter in church. Then the story shifts to a comedic retelling of the Adam & Eve story, with Milner & Van Doren as the first couple, Fay Spain as temptress Lilith, and Mickey Rooney as Satan! Also with June Wilkinson and Ziva Rodann. Rooney gets a co-director credit on this bizarre mash-up of soap opera, cheesecake and sub-moronic humor. 

Source: internet

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Martin Milner made so many films in so many genres - he is an underappreciated actor.

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17 hours ago, rayban said:

I loved every stylish minute of it - and, let's face it, it has a terrific twist ending.

Only Lana Turner knew how to suffer through these stylish romps.

I'd really have to be in the mood to watch it again, but it does have guilty pleasure qualities....

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15 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Private Lives of Adam and Eve (1960)  -  3/10

220px-Privatelivesadameve.JPG

Another dose of insipid lunacy from producer-director Albert Zugsmith. A group of people on a bus, including a couple having marital problems (Mamie Van Doren & Martin Milner), another couple having marital problems (Mickey Rooney & Fay Spain), a runaway teen (Tuesday Weld), a traveling salesman (Mel Torme), a hot-rodding musician (Paul Anka), and the bus driver (Cecil Kellaway), are caught up in a torrential flood, causing them to seek shelter in church. Then the story shifts to a comedic retelling of the Adam & Eve story, with Milner & Van Doren as the first couple, Fay Spain as temptress Lilith, and Mickey Rooney as Satan! Also with June Wilkinson and Ziva Rodann. Rooney gets a co-director credit on this bizarre mash-up of soap opera, cheesecake and sub-moronic humor. 

Source: internet

8361864620_ce877170f1.jpg

privae+lives+8.jpg

 

OMG!!!!!! MAMIE and MICKEY in the same film??? Another MEL TORME movie! LOL. It sounds awful.

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

whichcever NANCY DREW movie it is where NED has to dress up like a female NURSE with a cloak and everything to help an old lady break out of the sanitarium.

 

Nancy Drew: Detective (1938) has Ted Nickerson in drag as a nurse.

Nancy Drew... Reporter (1939) has Police Sgt. Entwhistle in drag as an old woman.

Nancy Drew and the Hidden Staircase (1939) has Ted Nickerson in drag as a woman with a feathery hat.

I must remember to look with great care the next time I watch: Nancy Drew... Trouble Shooter (1939) to see if I can spot the crossdresser. I believe it must be an extra as I remember no character who is one.

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The Pusher (1960)  -  6/10

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Crime drama based on a novel by Ed McBain, with a script by Harold Robbins. Cops Lt. Byrne (Douglas Rodgers) and Detective Carella (Robert Lansing) investigate the death of a young junkie, leading them to a local pusher (Felice Orlandi) who's been preying on the local youth, including Laura (Kathy Carlyle), Byrne's daughter and Carella's fiancee. Also with Sloan Simpson, Sara Amman, and John Astin in his film debut. The NYC location shooting adds some gritty realism, and the controversial subject matter is treated with maturity. Many of the performances are weak, though, and the film's limited budget shows often, with wobbly set walls among the cheap production values. Lansing would play the same Carella character in the TV series 87th Precinct, based on Ed McBain's books.

Source: internet

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43 minutes ago, SansFin said:

Nancy Drew: Detective (1938) has Ted Nickerson in drag as a nurse.

Nancy Drew... Reporter (1939) has Police Sgt. Entwhistle in drag as an old woman.

Nancy Drew and the Hidden Staircase (1939) has Ted Nickerson in drag as a woman with a feathery hat.

I must remember to look with great care the next time I watch: Nancy Drew... Trouble Shooter (1939) to see if I can spot the crossdresser. I believe it must be an extra as I remember no character who is one.

thank you!

I also see in my original post that I accidentally referred to "Ned" (as he is in the books) with "Ted" (as he is in the movies.)

(or as "BOY DOORMAT" in the post-war translation for Japanese Audiences)

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On 4/10/2019 at 10:22 PM, LawrenceA said:

The Silence (2019)  -  5/10

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Apocalyptic horror based on a novel by Tim Lebbon. A species of carnivorous, bat-like creatures are unleashed from a massive cave system. They are blind, and drawn to any sound, and they also breed like rabbits, so soon scores of them are decimating cities in the northeast. The film follows one family's efforts to survive as the creatures devour most of the people and society collapses. Starring Stanley Tucci as the dad, Miranda Otto as the mom, Kiernan Shipka as the deaf daughter, Kate Trotter, Kyle Breitkopf, Dempsey Bryk, Billy MacLellan, and John Corbett. This is a cheaper, less effective variation on last year's A Quiet Place and Birdbox. Tucci and Shipka are both good, but there isn't much more than cursory character development, and the scenarios are too routine to bring much excitement. The creatures themselves are pretty silly looking, which undercuts the fear factor a great deal. 

Source: Netflix

Thanks for the review, Lawrence. I saw this while I was browsing Netflix the other day, and I might give it a watch, since I like Tucci, Otto, and Shipka. But just from seeing the small excerpt, I was very aware of the similarities between this and Bird Box/A Quiet Place, and I don't expect to be very impressed. 

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The Savage Innocents (1960)  -  7/10

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The life of Eskimos living in the Arctic circle is dramatized by writer-director Nicholas Ray. Anthony Quinn stars as Inuk, a hunter who follows the traditional ways, struggling to survive with his wife Asiak (Yoko Tani). Also featuring Anna May Wong, Marie Yang, Marco Guglielmi, Kaida Horiuchi, Lee Montague, Anthony Chinn, Michael Chow, and Peter O'Toole. There's a lot of gorgeous arctic scenery interspersed with obviously phony sets. The depiction of Eskimo life is told plainly, without overdone reverence or condescension. There's quite a bit of violence to animals, though, and some of it seems real and not staged, including the killing of seals and a polar bear. Peter O'Toole, playing a regional law enforcement officer, asked for his name to be taken off the film after his dialogue was dubbed by another actor.

Source: Amazon Prime

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