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Scent of Mystery aka Holiday in Spain (1960)  -  4/10

270547720171beb4a664469d16f1d8d8.gif  220px-Scent_of_Mystery_FilmPoster.jpeg

Gimmick-filled mystery/adventure with Denholm Elliott as a mystery writer on holiday in Spain who gets entangled with a plot to kill a mystery woman. Elliott tries to find the identity of the intended target, as well as that of her would-be killers. With Peter Lorre as a helpful cab driver, Paul Lukas, Liam Redmond, Diana Dors, Leo McKern, Peter Arne, Mary Laura Wood, and ??? as "The Woman of Mystery". This was shot in the Cinerama format, and was accompanied by Smell-O-Vision, wherein selected theaters with the right equipment would pump smells into the audience tailored to specific scenes, such as roses, garlic, wine, gunpowder, etc. The movie went over like a lead balloon, and quickly disappeared, only to be re-released in 1962 under the Holiday in Spain title and without the smells. This version flopped, too, but it's the only version still available, as all copies of the original, unedited film seem to have disappeared. The remaining movie is dull, although it has nice location cinematography. I watched it for Lorre, who is bloated and tired looking here.

Source: TCM

 

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27 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I watched it for Lorre, who is bloated and tired looking here.

If memory serves, he gets to look all that and sweaty in the following year's Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea:

009543e21f8fea18a53137fcfb0649fb--walter

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Sex Kittens Go to College (1960)  -  3/10

220px-Sexkittenscollege.jpg

Here we go again... Albert Zugsmith wrote-produced-directed this dopey comedy about a gorgeous babe with a genius I.Q. (Mamie Van Doren) who is chosen by a robot/computer to teach at a university. Is that how all faculty are hired? Anyway, scandal may rock this institution of higher learning if her past as a stripper ("The Tallahassee Tassel-****") is exposed. With Martin Milner, Tuesday Weld, Vampira, Mickey Shaughnessy, Pamela Mason, Louis Nye, Jackie Coogan, Mijanou (sister of Brigitte) Bardot, John Carradine, Conway Twitty (as himself), Harold Lloyd Jr., Charlie Chaplin Jr., and Norman "Woo Woo" Grabowski as Norman "Woo Woo" Grabowski. I watched the extended "adult" cut of the movie, which includes some topless striptease numbers, but not by any of the credited cast members. Certainly not mankind's finest hour.

Source: internet

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Studs Lonigan (1960)  -  5/10

220px-Studs_Lonigan_poster.jpg

Dreary drama about disaffected youth during the 1920's. Christopher Knight stars as the title guy who likes to shoot pool and get drunk with his pals rather than look for meaningful work. His admiration for good girl Lucy (Venetia Stevenson) drives him to try and better himself, with mixed results. Featuring Jack Nicholson, Frank Gorshin and Robert Casper as his pals, Dick Foran, Carolyn Craig, Katherine Squire, Helen Westcott, Kathy Johnson, Jack Kruschen, Kathie Browne, Madame Spivy, Stanley Adams, and Jay C. Flippen. Producer Philip Yordan adapted the book by James T. Farrell, and some future notables, such as cameraman Haskell Wexler and composer Jerry Goldsmith, worked on the film. Most of the film is a pretentious bore, but there's a nascent counter-culture vibe rumbling about in the background that's barely interesting. I watched this for Jack Nicholson, playing Lonigan's most unsavory friend. 

Source: YouTube

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"Hit The Deck" - Roy Rowland - 1955 -

starring Jane Powell, Vic Damone, Ann Miller, Tony Martin, Debbie Reynolds, Russ Tamblyn, Gene Raymond, Kay Armen, etc. -

Bloated but entertaining MGM musical about three sailors on shore leave and their lady loves -

it has a terrific score, which was taken from the music of Vincent Youmans -

the film is based on a play and a musical -

the choreography, which is quite spirited, was by Hermes Pan -

lots of characters, a lot of plot -

but, at two hours of screen time, you are having a great time -

this one was Jane Powell's last screen musical at MGM -

RKO made the stage musical in 1930, but, when they sold the rights to MGM, the film disappeared -

hit+the+deck+-+gold.jpg

 

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I came home with a sick headache and bodyaches, looking for something mindless to relax me.  I watched Footsteps in the Dark on TCM On Demand, dozed through the first 15 minutes, but woke up and was still able to follow it.  I found it delightful and wish Flynn had done more of this type of light comedy.  The supporting cast was also excellent, the usual Warners' suspects -- Allyn Jenkins, Lee Patrick, and Alan Hale.  Lucile Watson as Flynn's mother-in-law even had some good one-liners about philandering husbands.  It's surprising how a film that was considered rather mediocre in its day can have some solid entertainment value now, or perhaps my fevered brain and Flynn's charm have biased  my opinion.

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12 minutes ago, rosebette said:

I came home with a sick headache and bodyaches, looking for something mindless to relax me.  I watched Footsteps in the Dark on TCM On Demand, dozed through the first 15 minutes, but woke up and was still able to follow it.  I found it delightful and wish Flynn had done more of this type of light comedy.  The supporting cast was also excellent, the usual Warners' suspects -- Allyn Jenkins, Lee Patrick, and Alan Hale.  Lucile Watson as Flynn's mother-in-law even had some good one-liners about philandering husbands.  It's surprising how a film that was considered rather mediocre in its day can have some solid entertainment value now, or perhaps my fevered brain and Flynn's charm have biased  my opinion.

Wiki has this: Errol Flynn had just done seven period films in a row and was pestering Warner's for a change of pace so he was cast instead of Robinson. Once Flynn came on board, Olivia de Havilland was announced as his co star.  She was replaced by Brenda Marshall.

Not a fan of Marshall but since she doesn't have much to do in this film,  she doesn't bring it down. 

But it would have been great to see Errol and Olivia in another light comedy (Four's a Crowd being the only one they made).

As for E.G. Robinson instead of Flynn;     that falls under 'what where they thinking!!!'.   (not that Robinson wasn't good at comedy,  because he was,  but as good as an actor as he was, I don't think this type of light romantic comedy would have worked as well with him like it did with Flynn).    

 

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1 hour ago, rayban said:

"Hit The Deck" - Roy Rowland - 1955 -

starring Jane Powell, Vic Damone, Ann Miller, Tony Martin, Debbie Reynolds, Russ Tamblyn, Gene Raymond, Kay Armen, etc. -

Bloated but entertaining MGM musical about three sailors on shore leave and their lady loves -

it has a terrific score, which was taken from the music of Vincent Youmans -

the film is based on a play and a musical -

the choreography, which is quite spirited, was by Hermes Pan -

lots of characters, a lot of plot -

but, at two hours of screen time, you are having a great time -

this one was Jane Powell's last screen musical at MGM -

RKO made the stage musical in 1930, but, when they sold the rights to MGM, the film disappeared -

hit+the+deck+-+gold.jpg

 

I love the dance number "The Lady From The Bayou" Ann Miller does in her bare feet! We don't often get to see her in a non-Tap number.

I love this quote from Ms Miller:

"I have worked like a dog all my life, honey. Dancing, as
Fred Astaire once said, is next to ditch-digging. You sweat
and you slave and the audience doesn't think you've got a
brain in your head. So every time a good-looking millionaire
came along chasing me with cars and jewels, I married him
because he promised I'd never have to dance again."

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35 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Wiki has this: Errol Flynn had just done seven period films in a row and was pestering Warner's for a change of pace so he was cast instead of Robinson. Once Flynn came on board, Olivia de Havilland was announced as his co star.  She was replaced by Brenda Marshall.

Not a fan of Marshall but since she doesn't have much to do in this film,  she doesn't bring it down. 

But it would have been great to see Errol and Olivia in another light comedy (Four's a Crowd being the only one they made).

As for E.G. Robinson instead of Flynn;     that falls under 'what where they thinking!!!'.   (not that Robinson wasn't good at comedy,  because he was,  but as good as an actor as he was, I don't think this type of light romantic comedy would have worked as well with him like it did with Flynn).    

 

I think that if Robinson were cast, it would have been a very different picture.  Perhaps his amateur detective would not be an upper crust type in the social register, romancing a burlesque queen and climbing in and out out of two-story windows.   In later roles in the 40s he does indeed play a detective type of character (but not an upper class one oozing with charm) -- The Stranger and Double Indemnity are two examples.  Footsteps is clearly tailored to Flynn's personality -- clearly upper class with the English accent, but full of mischief and rebellion against social rules.  I could easily see Cary Grant playing a similar role -- both actors have a gift for light comedy that even includes some physicality (watch how Flynn runs up and down those stairs in their mansion home or recovers from being knocked out in the darkened hallway).    Brenda Marshall's role is rather thankless; I can't see Olivia taking on another vapid female lead in 1940.     By the way, the dialogue in Footsteps is quite good, wittier than the standard Warner's product.  It gives me great pleasure to hear Allen Jenkins say "dilletante";  I teach at the college level, and most of my students don't even know what that word means.    People must have had better vocabularies back in the day.

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12 minutes ago, rosebette said:

I think that if Robinson were cast, it would have been a very different picture.  Perhaps his amateur detective would not be an upper crust type in the social register, romancing a burlesque queen and climbing in and out out of two-story windows.   In later roles in the 40s he does indeed play a detective type of character (but not an upper class one oozing with charm) -- The Stranger and Double Indemnity are two examples.  Footsteps is clearly tailored to Flynn's personality -- clearly upper class with the English accent, but full of mischief and rebellion against social rules.  I could easily see Cary Grant playing a similar role -- both actors have a gift for light comedy that even includes some physicality (watch how Flynn runs up and down those stairs in their mansion home or recovers from being knocked out in the darkened hallway).    Brenda Marshall's role is rather thankless; I can't see Olivia taking on another vapid female lead in 1940.     By the way, the dialogue in Footsteps is quite good, wittier than the standard Warner's product.  It gives me great pleasure to hear Allen Jenkins say "dilletante";  I teach at the college level, and most of my students don't even know what that word means.    People must have had better vocabularies back in the day.

Yea,  while it wouldn't have been a good part for Olivia,  maybe if she was cast the producer \ director would have beefed up her role.   (ok,  I know I'm dreaming,,,,  I really just wish there was another Errol \ Olivia paring since they are one of my favorite screen couples).

As for Allen Jenkins and his vocabulary;  Well Jenkins was in Ball of Fire which was filmed the same year.   Maybe he learned a lot from Cooper,  the linguistics professor.  

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Wanted! Jane Turner (1936)

Fast moving RKO "B" about a pair of postal detectives (Lee Tracy, Gloria Stuart) involved in a cross country hunt after a killer following the robbery of a mail truck in which its driver is murdered.

A breezy affair, the film's marked by the constant light hearted bickering between motor mouthed Tracy and the lovely but feisty Stuart. These two actors had been co-starred two years before in a fun newspaper drama, I'll Tell the World, and there is a surprisingly strong chemistry between them, considerably heightening the film's appeal. Paul Guilfoyle, usually cast as a sleazy bad guy, is at it again here as the killer being sought by the pair.

wanted_jane_turner003.jpg

There are a couple of minor sub plots, one involving an old guy waiting for a letter from his (irresponsible) son with some money for him, the other dealing with a couple of scheming con job dames looking for lonely rich guys to send them "bus money" in the mail so they can "visit," only to be shocked when one of the "pigeons" appears in person. You also get a look at a time when some people used to show up at a post office in order to collect their mail.

Wanted! Jane Turner also has a few nice on location shots in LA streets, bringing a flavourful time capsule appeal to the proceedings. Lee Tracy fans should like this one and, in the lovely Miss Stuart, he has one of his best leading ladies. It's a shame these two couldn't have been co-starred more often with even better material.

I don't know if Wanted! Jane Turner has been shown on TCM (I don't recall that it has) but since it has now been released by the Warners Archive Collection with a nice print, I suspect it's only a matter of time.

51er-xyIX9L._SY445_.jpg

2.5 out of 4

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The Subterraneans (1960)  -  5/10

220px-Subterraneans.jpg

Hollywood does Kerouac with this melodramatic look at the San Francisco Beat scene. George Peppard stars as a would-be writer tied to the apron strings of his mother (Anne Heywood). He tries to break free via the Beat club scene, where he meets a motley assortment of figures, including a troubled French girl (Leslie Caron) that he falls in love with. Also featuring Roddy McDowell, Janice Rule, Jim Hutton, Scott Marlowe, Arte Johnson, Ruth Storey, Bert Freed, and Nanette Fabray. There are also appearances by Carmen McRae, Shelly Manne, Red Mitchell, Art Pepper, and Andre Previn as themselves. Kerouac's autobiographical novel was already heavily-fictionalized, but the screenplay changes even more, such as switching the NYC setting to SF, and changing the main female character from black to white & French. I thought it was pretty dull, although it's worth viewing to see how mainstream Hollywood (MGM) was depicting the counter-culture. 

Source: internet

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"Tea and Sympathy" - Vincente Minnelli - 1956 -

starring Deborah Kerr, John Kerr, Leif Erickson, Edward Andrews, Daryl Hickman, Norma Crane -

Beautifully rendered, but thoroughly falsified version of the famous Broadway hit -

sadly, the screenplay was written by the playwright, Robert Anderson -

for, in the play, it is not Tom Lee (John Kerr) who is homosexual, but Bill Reynolds, Laura's husband (Leif Erickson) who is homosexual -

but, since the subject of homosexuality could not be embraced, everyone concerned did a commendable job -

still, the revelation that a macho-oriented married man was a homosexual would have been quite a revelation back in 1956 -

superb performances from all of the mentioned actors -

especially Deborah Kerr, who is the essence of sympathy -

and John Kerr, who is such a wounded individual -

teaandsympathy1956.1615_092720130947.jpg

 

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Surprise Package (1960)  -  5/10

220px-Surprise_Package_(film_poster).jpg

Lethargic comedy starring Yul Brynner as a Greek-American gangster who gets deported back to Greece. He gets mixed up with an exiled royal (Noel Coward) and a scheme to buy crown jewels, and his life is further complicated by the arrival of his former moll (Mitzi Gaynor). Also with George Coulouris, Eric Pohlmann, Guy Deghy, Warren Mitchell, Lyndon Brook, Charles Farrell, Cec Linder, Bill Nagy, and Alf Dean. Brynner demonstrates once again that comedy was not his forte. Gaynor is game, though, and Coward brings a veneer of class.

Source: GetTV

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The Party

The waiter, the one who is drinking throughout the party until he is swaying and is a drunken mess absolutely steals the show. The shenanigans are funny but whenever Sellers denies a drink, the guy swigs it down. Someone else refuses it? He swigs it down. Drink isn't offered? He takes a swig. He's just plain fun! And the party itself feels busy, like it's an actual upscale party with the constant yammering and chit-chattering of the guests as background noise and constant jazz playing to the antics upfront. Even then it would have a funny background event for something upfront. And what I enjoyed was the ending; when the party ends, there is just minutes left of runtime. It doesn't pad out the ending with unnecessary filler.

7.5/10, that toilet paper gag was pretty funny. 

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7 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Subterraneans (1960)  -  5/10

220px-Subterraneans.jpg

Hollywood does Kerouac with this melodramatic look at the San Francisco Beat scene. George Peppard stars as a would-be writer tied to the apron strings of his mother (Anne Heywood). He tries to break free via the Beat club scene, where he meets a motley assortment of figures, including a troubled French girl (Leslie Caron) that he falls in love with. Also featuring Roddy McDowell, Janice Rule, Jim Hutton, Scott Marlowe, Arte Johnson, Ruth Storey, Bert Freed, and Nanette Fabray. There are also appearances by Carmen McRae, Shelly Manne, Red Mitchell, Art Pepper, and Andre Previn as themselves. Kerouac's autobiographical novel was already heavily-fictionalized, but the screenplay changes even more, such as switching the NYC setting to SF, and changing the main female character from black to white & French. I thought it was pretty dull, although it's worth viewing to see how mainstream Hollywood (MGM) was depicting the counter-culture. 

Source: internet

Didn't care for it either.

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3 hours ago, Ampersand said:

The Party

The waiter, the one who is drinking throughout the party until he is swaying and is a drunken mess absolutely steals the show. The shenanigans are funny but whenever Sellers denies a drink, the guy swigs it down. Someone else refuses it? He swigs it down. Drink isn't offered? He takes a swig. He's just plain fun! And the party itself feels busy, like it's an actual upscale party with the constant yammering and chit-chattering of the guests as background noise and constant jazz playing to the antics upfront. Even then it would have a funny background event for something upfront. And what I enjoyed was the ending; when the party ends, there is just minutes left of runtime. It doesn't pad out the ending with unnecessary filler.

7.5/10, that toilet paper gag was pretty funny. 

Remember that sequence at the beginning where Sellers accidently blows up the set? I believe that was a spoof of an actual incident that happened while Sergio Leone was filming The Good The Bad And The Ugly, a Spanish Army Captain set off the charges prematurely when he heard the director call for the cameras to start rolling. The Spanish Army took a week to rebuild it.

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10 hours ago, rayban said:

"Tea and Sympathy" - Vincente Minnelli - 1956 -

starring Deborah Kerr, John Kerr, Leif Erickson, Edward Andrews, Daryl Hickman, Norma Crane -

Beautifully rendered, but thoroughly falsified version of the famous Broadway hit -

sadly, the screenplay was written by the playwright, Robert Anderson -

for, in the play, it is not Tom Lee (John Kerr) who is homosexual, but Bill Reynolds, Laura's husband (Leif Erickson) who is homosexual -

but, since the subject of homosexuality could not be embraced, everyone concerned did a commendable job -

still, the revelation that a macho-oriented married man was a homosexual would have been quite a revelation back in 1956 -

superb performances from all of the mentioned actors -

especially Deborah Kerr, who is the essence of sympathy -

and John Kerr, who is such a wounded individual -

teaandsympathy1956.1615_092720130947.jpg

 

The famous play is about homosexuality -

the screen version is about homophobia -

quite a difference, I would say -

John Kerr deserved a screen career -

he got better and better, he was terrific in "Gaby", the film that might have made him a star -

MV5BMzViZThjYzEtZTNhNy00NGI1LWEyYWUtNzA5

 

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15 hours ago, TomJH said:

Wanted! Jane Turner (1936)

I don't know if Wanted! Jane Turner has been shown on TCM (I don't recall that it has) but since it has now been released by the Warners Archive Collection with a nice print, I suspect it's only a matter of time.

According to MovieCollectorOH's database this film has been on TCM six times. The last two times were August 2014 and then April 2005 before that. So the last time it was for somebody's day for Summer Under the Stars, probably Lee Tracy?

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Take Aim at the Police Van (1960)  -  6/10

220px-Take-aim-at-the-police-vanj.jpg

Japanese crime drama starring Michitaro Mizushima as a police guard on a prison bus when it is attacked by a sniper, killing two of the prisoners. Mizushima is placed on suspension pending investigation, so he sets out to try and find the who & why of the attack and redeem his reputation. Also featuring Misako Watanabe, Shoichi Ozawa, Shinsuke Ashida, Mari Shiraki, Toru Abe, and Tatsuo Matsushita. Directed by Seijun Suzuki, this lacks the visual flair and bizarre characters of his later, better known films. Mizushima is merely okay as the protagonist, and the story lacks pacing. Still, some of the supporting performers are memorable, and there's a bit of 60's Japanese cinematic style that peeks through on occasion.

Source: The Criterion Channel

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12 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Surprise Package (1960)  -  5/10

220px-Surprise_Package_(film_poster).jpg

Lethargic comedy starring Yul Brynner as a Greek-American gangster who gets deported back to Greece. He gets mixed up with an exiled royal (Noel Coward) and a scheme to buy crown jewels, and his life is further complicated by the arrival of his former moll (Mitzi Gaynor). Also with George Coulouris, Eric Pohlmann, Guy Deghy, Warren Mitchell, Lyndon Brook, Charles Farrell, Cec Linder, Bill Nagy, and Alf Dean. Brynner demonstrates once again that comedy was not his forte. Gaynor is game, though, and Coward brings a veneer of class.

Source: GetTV

I really enjoyed Surprise Package.   Gaynor looks wonderful in this film and the clothes they have her wear were designed to showoff her figure (and what a figure!).     Gaynor and Coward keep it interesting and I liked the jazz style performance of the song,  Surprise Package  (though Coward's voice was 'limit').  

 

   

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41 minutes ago, calvinnme said:

According to MovieCollectorOH's database this film has been on TCM six times. The last two times were August 2014 and then April 2005 before that. So the last time it was for somebody's day for Summer Under the Stars, probably Lee Tracy?

Thanks. I'm a fan of Lee Tracy and am a bit surprised that I could have missed the film that many times. Either that or it doesn't make it onto TCM in Canada.

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On 4/11/2019 at 4:05 PM, LawrenceA said:

Portrait in Black (1960)  -  6/10

220px-Portrait_in_Black_1960.jpg

Melodrama with Lana Turner as the trophy wife of miserable shipping magnate Lloyd Nolan. Lana has an affair with Lloyd's doctor (Anthony Quinn), and the duo knock off Lloyd so that they can be together. But then they start getting blackmail letters and the tension mounts... Also with Sandra Dee, John Saxon, Richard Basehart, Ray Walston, Virginia Grey, Paul Birch, and Anna May Wong. This is essentially another soaper, but the murder-suspense elements are accentuated. It's often presented in an over-the-top manner, with florid performances and big musical stings on the score. I found it mildly entertaining, and enjoyed the cast. This would be the final film for Anna May Wong, who would pass the following year. This was also my 100th Anthony Quinn movie.

Source: internet

 

On 4/11/2019 at 4:40 PM, rayban said:

I loved every stylish minute of it - and, let's face it, it has a terrific twist ending.

Only Lana Turner knew how to suffer through these stylish romps.

Jean-Louis is the star of this movie. I'm surprised nobody else mentioned that.

The fact that it's over the top is what makes it so entertaining.

Along with these fine actors playing this in melodramatic Technicolor.

BTW-- Ray Walston is hilarious in this movie. I'm surprised no one mentioned that either.

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The Tempest (1960)  -  7/10

MV5BMDcxY2U1YzQtMDk0NC00ZDQ2LThmNWYtYWY1

TV-movie adaptation of the Shakespeare play. With Maurice Evans as Prospero, Lee Remick as Miranda, Roddy McDowall as Ariel, Richard Burton as Caliban, Tom Poston as Trinculo, Liam Redmond as Gonzalo, William Bassett as Ferdinand, Ronald Radd as Stephano, Geoffrey Lamb as Alonso, William LeMassena as Antonio, and Paul Ballantyne as Sebastian. This is relatively short (76 minutes), and the settings and effects are the usual TV-movie level. However, the costumes are nice, and McDowall and Burton really get to let loose. Remick is exceedingly beautiful, as well. The oddest sight was Tom Poston, playing a very effeminate Trinculo.

Source: YouTube 

Richard Burton, Lee Remick, and Tom Poston

the-tempest-rare-original-broadcast-1960

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I've seen that version before and disliked it. I thought the costumes were horrible and didn't like how they edited the play (though that is to be expected with the short runtime). The atonal soundtrack certainly doesn't do it justice either. Lee Remick is the best part about it by far.

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