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29 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

I've seen that version before and disliked it. I thought the costumes were horrible and didn't like how they edited the play (though that is to be expected with the short runtime). The atonal soundtrack certainly doesn't do it justice either. Lee Remick is the best part about it by far.

did like the costumes, particularly Roddy McDowall's look. The Tempest has aspects that I should like, such as the supernatural elements, and yet I've never been very fond of the versions that I've seen. I'm not sure what it is, but the story loses me by the time Caliban and Trinculo first meet and their scenes go on for way too long, and are supposed to be funny (I think), but aren't. I've only seen a few versions of the play because of this, and as flawed as I thought this TV version was, it's been my favorite* thus far, despite (or perhaps because of) the limitations of the medium and the brevity of the adaptation. 

*Naturally, I'm not including Forbidden Planet, which was inspired by The Tempest, but isn't really an adaptation.

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"Queen of the Desert" (2015?) @ Netflix-

'epic biographical drama film written and directed by Werner Herzog and is based on the life of British traveller, writer, archaeologist, explorer, cartographer and political officer Gertrude Bell.....(aka the 'Female Lawrence of Arabia')

... The film stars Nicole Kidman, James Franco, Damian Lewis and Robert Pattinson ...'

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_of_the_Desert_(film)

====================================

 

-Intrigued by subject & Director, but disappointed in empty, overlong but beautifully photographed and well-acted...

Someone should do a decent bio-pic on Bell, who appears to have a fascinating and influential (on the Mid-East) life...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gertrude_Bell

 

 

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A Touch of Larceny (1960)  -  7/10

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British comedy with James Mason as a womanizing Naval officer who sets his sights on American Vera Miles. She's engaged to wealthy George Sanders, but Mason thinks he can woo her away if only he had a fortune of his own. To that end, he decides to fake a Soviet defection in order to sue the newspapers for defamation! Also with Oliver Johnston, Robert Flemyng, William Kendall, Duncan Lamont, Martin Stephens, and Harry Andrews. This is played very straight, with more wit than farce. Mason is very good, with good support from the able cast. I liked seeing Sanders and Stephens sharing screentime the same year they co-starred in Village of the Damned

Source: TCM

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2 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

A Touch of Larceny (1960)  -  7/10

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People mostly associate James Mason with drama but the delightful A Touch of Larceny and parts of Lolita (the first half, in particular) show that, with superior material, he could play a humourous scene with sophistication and a dry subtle wit.

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The Trials of Oscar Wilde (1960)  -  7/10

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British biopic on the noted author and playwright and his various legal troubles. Wilde (Peter Finch) leads a successful, extravagant life, the toast of society and a source of amusement for his rapier wit and eccentric manner, but when his dalliances with a young man (John Fraser) bring undue attention, especially from the man's father the Marquis of Queensbury (Lionel Jeffries), Wilde finds his presence unwanted, and his exploits eventually lead him to the courthouse. Also featuring Yvonne Mitchell, Nigel Patrick, Sonia Dresdel, Maxine Audley, James Booth, Laurence Naismith, Michael Goodliffe, and James Mason. The subject matter was controversial, but the film tested the boundaries of what was allowed to be discussed onscreen at the time. It seems a bit quaint now, not to mention saddening, but the film works as both an indictment on British society in the time depicted, and the time in which the movie was made. Finch is exceptional, as is Jeffries as the detestable Marquis. Mason has a brief but showy role as a lawyer. 

Source: YouTube

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On 4/11/2019 at 10:36 AM, LawrenceA said:

Please Don't Eat the Daisies (1960)  -  5/10

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Bland domestic comedy with Doris Day married to drama critic David Niven. They face various personal and professional dilemmas of a largely mundane nature. With Janis Paige, Spring Byington, Stanley Livingstone, Charles Herbert, Richard Haydn, Patsy Kelly, Jack Weston, and Margaret Lindsay. I can't call this a bad movie, but it never really got started, and I don't think I even cracked a smile, let alone laughed.

Source: TCM

I like Doris Day and David Niven and I can even tolerate the silliest and ridiculous of golden age family comedies, but I cannot stand this film.  The only reason why I cannot stand it is the baby's crying being dubbed by an adult pretending to cry like a baby.  The dubbing is so bad, it takes me out of the film.  It is just so annoying, I feel myself recoiling whenever "the 'baby' voice" returns. It reminds me of that episode of The Twilight Zone where Mary Badham's child voice is dubbed by an adult pretending to be a child.  It's terrible.

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On 4/12/2019 at 1:45 PM, LawrenceA said:

Sex Kittens Go to College (1960)  -  3/10

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Here we go again... Albert Zugsmith wrote-produced-directed this dopey comedy about a gorgeous babe with a genius I.Q. (Mamie Van Doren) who is chosen by a robot/computer to teach at a university. Is that how all faculty are hired? Anyway, scandal may rock this institution of higher learning if her past as a stripper ("The Tallahassee Tassel-****") is exposed. With Martin Milner, Tuesday Weld, Vampira, Mickey Shaughnessy, Pamela Mason, Louis Nye, Jackie Coogan, Mijanou (sister of Brigitte) Bardot, John Carradine, Conway Twitty (as himself), Harold Lloyd Jr., Charlie Chaplin Jr., and Norman "Woo Woo" Grabowski as Norman "Woo Woo" Grabowski. I watched the extended "adult" cut of the movie, which includes some topless striptease numbers, but not by any of the credited cast members. Certainly not mankind's finest hour.

Source: internet

I just had to google what word the asterisks could have possibly replaced.  Apparently the word t osser is not allowed? 

I have seen this film once, I think I recorded it during the Tuesday Weld marathon TCM had a while back.  I don't remember much about it, other than it being dumb.  It wasn't even dumb in a good way.  It was just dumb. 

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On 4/12/2019 at 4:41 PM, rosebette said:

I came home with a sick headache and bodyaches, looking for something mindless to relax me.  I watched Footsteps in the Dark on TCM On Demand, dozed through the first 15 minutes, but woke up and was still able to follow it.  I found it delightful and wish Flynn had done more of this type of light comedy.  The supporting cast was also excellent, the usual Warners' suspects -- Allyn Jenkins, Lee Patrick, and Alan Hale.  Lucile Watson as Flynn's mother-in-law even had some good one-liners about philandering husbands.  It's surprising how a film that was considered rather mediocre in its day can have some solid entertainment value now, or perhaps my fevered brain and Flynn's charm have biased  my opinion.

I enjoy this film as well. I love Flynn's impression of a Texan, "i felt that [kiss] right down to my spurs!" I thought this was a solid film.  Even Brenda Marshall, whom I usually find to be a bit on the bland side, was good in this film.  I liked the moment when she and her mother, Lucile Watson, go to meet Blondie (Lee Patrick) in the burlesque club.  Marshall's face is funny when she sees Patrick, the woman she suspects is her husband's side piece. Alan Hale and William Frawley are funny as the cops.  I also liked Ralph Bellamy's crooked dentist part.  I always laugh when Flynn's rubber gun is bent and he has to quickly re-form it. 

I believe that I read somewhere that Footsteps in the Dark was Warner Brothers' attempt at creating a 'Thin Man' esque series starring Flynn.  However, the box office returns weren't what was expected and the idea of creating a series was nixed.  I wish that Flynn had appeared in more roles like this, he was adept at light comedy. 

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Trouble in the Sky aka Cone of Silence (1960)  -  7/10

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British drama with Bernard Lee as a veteran airline pilot who was recently blamed for an accident. Fellow pilot Michael Craig thinks that it may have been mechanical error instead, but supervisory pilot Peter Cushing is determined that it was Lee's fault, leading to tragedy. Also with Elizabeth Seal as Lee's concerned daughter and Craig's love interest, George Sanders as the airline's attorney, Andre Morell, Charles Tingwell, Marne Maitland, and Gordon Jackson. Many viewers may find this a bit too stodgy and dull, but I remained interested throughout. Lee, best known as the original "M" in the Bond films, has one of his better roles here. Sanders makes the most of his brief screen time, and Cushing has one of his few non-horror roles as the antagonist.

Source: internet

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Trials of Oscar Wilde (1960)  -  7/10

the_trials_of_oscar_wilde.jpg?itok=-VfSZ

British biopic on the noted author and playwright and his various legal troubles. Wilde (Peter Finch) leads a successful, extravagant life, the toast of society and a source of amusement for his rapier wit and eccentric manner, but when his dalliances with a young man (John Fraser) bring undue attention, especially from the man's father the Marquis of Queensbury (Lionel Jeffries), Wilde finds his presence unwanted, and his exploits eventually lead him to the courthouse. Also featuring Yvonne Mitchell, Nigel Patrick, Sonia Dresdel, Maxine Audley, James Booth, Laurence Naismith, Michael Goodliffe, and James Mason. The subject matter was controversial, but the film tested the boundaries of what was allowed to be discussed onscreen at the time. It seems a bit quaint now, not to mention saddening, but the film works as both an indictment on British society in the time depicted, and the time in which the movie was made. Finch is exceptional, as is Jeffries as the detestable Marquis. Mason has a brief but showy role as a lawyer. 

Source: YouTube

What went on between Oscar Wilde and Lord Alfred Douglas is left in doubt in the film.

But the casting of John Fraser, who is quite good, makes it quite obvious.

The ending, in which Wilde can't even acknowledge Douglas, is very sad indeed.

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19 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I enjoy this film as well. I love Flynn's impression of a Texan, "i felt that [kiss] right down to my spurs!" I thought this was a solid film.  Even Brenda Marshall, whom I usually find to be a bit on the bland side, was good in this film.  I liked the moment when she and her mother, Lucile Watson, go to meet Blondie (Lee Patrick) in the burlesque club.  Marshall's face is funny when she sees Patrick, the woman she suspects is her husband's side piece. Alan Hale and William Frawley are funny as the cops.  I also liked Ralph Bellamy's crooked dentist part.  I always laugh when Flynn's rubber gun is bent and he has to quickly re-form it. 

I believe that I read somewhere that Footsteps in the Dark was Warner Brothers' attempt at creating a 'Thin Man' esque series starring Flynn.  However, the box office returns weren't what was expected and the idea of creating a series was nixed.  I wish that Flynn had appeared in more roles like this, he was adept at light comedy. 

There seem to be a number of posters who like Footsteps in the Dark. And that's fine.

However, I've never been one of them. I think it's probably Flynn's weakest film during what was, in retrospect, the peak period of his career, the late '30s and early 40's. Not that Errol doesn't have charm and clearly the ability to play light hearted comedy and, yes, I do enjoy his performance for fleeting moments.

Probably my favourite moment in the film is a passing small one, when Flynn is trying to extricate himself from an awkward situation by kissing up to his pushy mother-in-law (Lucille Watson) by complimenting her on her hair.

"Oh, mother, your hair looks so cute that way," he says. Then, as he starts to walk away, he adds one word, "Smooth," with a look of total insincerity on his face. That line, plus Flynn's awkward facial expression, makes me laugh out loud.

Footsteps has an admittedly admirable supporting cast of character/comedy players. William Frawley, Allen Jenkins, Lee Patrick, Alan Hale, Roscoe Karns, all good people. But Warner Brothers, bless them, just didn't make funny comedies, for the most part. They are too strident, too frantic, too loud, and Footsteps in the Dark, despite Flynn's game efforts, is simply weak material that may have a moment or two, thanks to the cast, but, in my opinion, finally fizzles and just lies flat on the screen.

Oh, and Brenda Marshall in a weak role as the suspicious wife. She and Flynn have as much chemistry in this film as they had had in The Sea Hawk and that, I'm afraid, is none at all.

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31 minutes ago, rayban said:

What went on between Oscar Wilde and Lord Alfred Douglas is left in doubt in the film.

 But the casting of John Fraser, who is quite good, makes it quite obvious.

 The ending, in which Wilde can't even acknowledge Douglas, is very sad indeed.

How, in your view, does this version compare with the earlier version starring Robert Morley and the later version starring Stephen Fry? I liked both of those versions, but have not seen this one. I have always been interested in this trial and even have a book containing a verbatim transcript of the trial.

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9 hours ago, Thenryb said:

How, in your view, does this version compare with the earlier version starring Robert Morley and the later version starring Stephen Fry? I liked both of those versions, but have not seen this one. I have always been interested in this trial and even have a book containing a verbatim transcript of the trial.

Since the year was 1960, I do realize the limitations that were imposed on the production,.

But Oscar Wilde and Lord Alfred Douglas never even touch each other.

They do not embrace and they do not kiss.

They seem like contentious friends on the same side of the same issue.

The film is very good in that it concentrates on the emotional toll of the three trials - yes, all three trials are included.

Peter Finch gives an understated but heartfelt performance.

And John Fraser is a beast of a boy.

But, as films about Oscar Wilde go, I prefer "Wilde" with Stephen Fry and Jude Law.

And the most recent one, "The Happy Prince" with Rupert Everett, is a devastating glimpse into his last three years,  in which old age, poverty, alcoholism and depravity got the best of him.  

MV5BMGQzNmQxMTUtZjg5NC00N2Y5LTg3MWEtYzA3

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Poster.jpg

In Reservoir Dogs Quentin Tarantino earned his Neo Noir punch card. It's an exceptionally stylistic  film. You can see Sergio Leone's influences in the fractured storylines (Once Upon A Time In America), the picaresque humor (For A Few Dollars More) and the three way Mexican Standoff (The Good The Bad And The Ugly) in a low rent brick warehouse in Highland Park, City Of Angels. You can hear the brilliance of Tarantino's organic sounding dialogue and enjoy the audio punctuations that accompany the interesting camera movements and angles. It's a hoot.

The cast can boast six Classic Film Noir veteran actor Lawrence Tierney and Neo Noir vets Harvey Keitel, Michael Madsen, Steve Buscemi. Of the rest Chris Penn, and Tim Roth's careers really took off, Randy Brooks and Kirk Blatz are still pretty active and only real excon Edward Bunker sort of stayed on the back burner (and probably out of trouble) careerwise. All the actors in the film are intense and compelling.

If you haven't seen it, do so. 10/10. Review with screencaps in Film Noir/Gangster pages.

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

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Reservoir Dogs is a well crafted and realistic crime caper gone wrong film, boasting fine performances.

Having said that that the scene in which Michael Madsen torments and tortures a helpless captive, threatening to set him on fire, is repellent to me in its sadism. Madsen's character's perverted relish of the moment (his happy little hum and dance) adds to the sickness of the scene.

Yes, the scene is designed by Tarantino to make its audience uncomfortable and squirm and, in that, it succeeds. (Though you're also aware there is bound to be, sadly, a small part of the audience that will be attracted to this kind of depravity and degradation).

In any event, due to that scene, one viewing of Reservoir Dogs is sufficient for me. There will be no return visits by this viewer.

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26 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Yes, the scene is designed by Tarantino to make its audience uncomfortable and squirm and, in that, it succeeds. (Though you're also aware there is bound to be, sadly, a small part of the audience that will be attracted to this kind of depravity and degradation).

In any event, due to that scene, one viewing of Reservoir Dogs is sufficient for me. There will be no return visits by this viewer.

Just remember

"Good taste is the enemy of creativity" Pablo Picasso 😎

P.S. It wasn't something Tarantino entirely designed on his own. The ear cutting sequence with Kurt Blatz was also an homage to a similar scene in Spaghetti Western director Sergio Corbucci's Django (1966).

 

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30 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Just remember

"Good taste is the enemy of creativity" Pablo Picasso 😎

P.S. It wasn't something Tarantino entirely designed on his own. The ear cutting sequence with Kurt Blatz was also an homage to a similar scene in Spaghetti Western director Sergio Corbucci's Django (1966).

 

I wonder if Picasso would have also been pleased with some of the creativity found in some torture porn films.

Maybe, to be fair, that comment's a little over the top, cigarjoe, but, anyway, you get my point about equating a prolonged sequence of sadism in a film to creativity.

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

Maybe, to be fair, that comment's a little over the top, cigarjoe, but, anyway, you get my point about equating a prolonged sequence of sadism in a film to creativity.

I don't know if you can equate anything, Gibson's The Passion Of The Christ is a religious experience for some. Also the first guy who picked up his own **** and drew on the wall to pass a thought to his fellow cave dwellers wouldn't be considered creative. In today's world he'd be shipped to the looney bin.

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18 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

I don't know if you can equate anything, Gibson's The Passion Of The Christ is a religious experience so some. Also the first guy who picked up his own **** and drew on the wall to pass a thought to his fellow cave dwellers wouldn't be considered creative. In today's world he'd be shipped to the looney bin.

Actually in today's world he gets hauled out of an Ecuadorian embassy.

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4 hours ago, TomJH said:

Having said that that the scene in which Michael Madsen torments and tortures a helpless captive, threatening to set him on fire, is repellent to me in its sadism. Madsen's character's perverted relish of the moment (his happy little hum and dance) adds to the sickness of the scene.

You need to be careful lest other commenters tell you you only dislike it because of some bigotry on your part.

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Tunes of Glory (1960)  -  8/10

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British military drama starring Alec Guinness as Maj. Sinclair, the loud, boisterous commanding officer of a Scottish regiment in the years after WWII. Higher ups decide that Sinclair isn't an appropriate peacetime commander, so they send Col. Barrow (John Mills) to replace him. Barrow is a strict ruler-follower who likes life quiet, sober, and "respectable". This sets the stage for a battle of wills between the two officers. Also featuring Dennis Price, Kay Walsh, Gordon Jackson, John Fraser, Duncan Macrae, Percy Herbert, Allan Cuthbertson, Andrew Keir, and Susannah York in her debut. I've heard of this movie for a long time, and knew that it was well-liked (Guinness considered it one of his best performances), but it wasn't what I was expecting. It's a psychological study of these two men, and, with the Barrow character, an early examination of PTSD before it was called that (he was a P.O.W. in a Japanese camp, and was tortured). The accents can be much, and if you don't like bagpipes, this is definitely not the movie for you, but I thought the acting was terrific, and the slow-burn drama builds to a shattering conclusion.

Source: TCM

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The Warped Ones (1960)  -  7/10

The_Warped_Ones_poster.jpg

Japanese JD movie, with Tamio Kawaji as a jazz-loving delinquent fresh out of juvenile prison who immediately returns to his criminal ways, including car theft, robbery, assault, and even kidnapping and rape. With Yuko Chiyo, Eiji Go, Hiroyuki Nagato, Noriko Matsumoto, and Chico Lourant. This visually hyperactive film resembles Breathless in many ways, although this film is grimmer. There's a frantic jazz score and rapid edits. The film is more of a character study on Kawaji's Akira than a plot-driven crime drama or thriller. The Sun Tribe sub-culture was big in Japan at the time, with jazz-loving, beach-going, disaffected and criminal youth in the news. Followed by a sequel, Black Sun, in '64.

Source: TCM

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8 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Just remember

"Good taste is the enemy of creativity" Pablo Picasso 😎

P.S. It wasn't something Tarantino entirely designed on his own. The ear cutting sequence with Kurt Blatz was also an homage to a similar scene in Spaghetti Western director Sergio Corbucci's Django (1966).

If it's Tarantino...it's a homage to SOMETHING culty from the late 60's to early 70's.  😓

Just remember

"Good taste is the enemy of creativity" Pablo Picasso 

Just keep telling yourself that the next time you sit through Ken Russell's "Lisztomania"...

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