Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

Zazie dans le Metro (1960)  -  7/10

220px-Zazie-dans-le-metro-poster.jpg

Manic, anarchic French comedy with Catherine Demongeot as 10-year-old Zazie, who is sent to stay with her Uncle Gabriel (Philippe Noiret) in Paris while her mother runs off with her latest lover. Zazie has various adventures all over the city, including in the markets, across bridges, and up & down the Eiffel Tower. Also with Hubert Deschamps, Carla Marlier, Annie Fratellini, Vittorio Caprioli, Jacques Dufilho, Yvonne Clech, Claude Berri, and Odette Piquet. Absurd, cartoonish, and wildly inventive, this is drastically different from the other Malle films that I've seen. It came across as what if The 400 Blows was remade by Jacques Tati using a script by Salvador Dali. It all may be a bit too much, too noisy, too silly, but if I still took hallucinogenics, this would be a good movie to watch with them. It's still amusing even in a sober state of mind, just as long as you know what you're getting yourself into.

Source: The Criterion Channel

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Intimidation (1960)  -  7/10

Intimidation.jpg

Japanese crime drama with Nobuo Kaneko as an assistant bank manager on the career fast track who gets blackmailed by the pimp of his mistress into robbing his own bank. Things grow complicated when meek fellow bank employee Ko Nishimura is assigned to guard the bank on the night of the robbery. Also with Mari Shiraki, Jun Hamamura, Kojiro Kusanagi, Yoko Kosono, and Zenji Yamada. Nishimura, a recognizable supporting actor in many Japanese films of the era, gets a great role and delivers a truly outstanding performance as the overlooked man with more going on in his head than anyone gives him credit for. This is short (65 minutes), and the ending is bit too neat, but it moves very quickly, and crime-movie fans should dig it.

Source: The Criterion Channel

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/13/2019 at 5:23 PM, LawrenceA said:

The Tempest has aspects that I should like, such as the supernatural elements, and yet I've never been very fond of the versions that I've seen.

I've seen many stage versions and pretty much liked them all. Most recent were the RSC's hologram-laden version with Simon Russell Beale; as well as a throwback 19th century-type version with Ralph Fiennes. Other Tempests I have loved featured Denis Quilley, Michael Bryant, and Alec McCowen.

aeril-holo.jpg?w=1400

THE-TEMPEST-4811.jpg

I do like the Derek Jarman film version, with the most unexpected finale. Totally woke up the audience at the Cinema 3 when I saw it in 1979, when Elisabeth Welch sang "Stormy Weather."

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Kapo (1960)  -  8/10

220px-Kapo_film.jpg

Italian Holocaust drama with Susan Strasberg as a teenage Jewish girl in France during the occupation.  She's soon sent to a concentration camp where she assumes the identity of a non-Jewish political prisoner, thus avoiding immediate execution. She's later sent to a women's work camp, where her desperation drives her to become a "kapo", a sort of trustee assigned to guard over her fellow prisoners, earning more food and creature comforts, but in exchange losing her humanity. Also featuring Emmanuelle Riva, Laurent Terzieff, Gianni Garko, Annabella Besi, Graziella Galvani, Paola Pitagora, and Didi Perego. Stark, brutal and emotionally devastating, with fantastic performances from Strasberg, Riva (as a sensitive prisoner), and Perego (as a tough-as-nails prisoner). The version I watched was mostly in Italian, but I understand that there's also an English-language dub.

Source: The Criterion Channel

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

A PATCH OF BLUE (1965) *Score: 6/10*

Starring: Sidney Poitier, Elizabeth Hartman, Shelley Winters. 

I've seen this film before, and I'm actually quite fond of it. Hartman always impresses me as the young & abused blind girl, Selina, who befriends an African American man (Poitier). I also really enjoy the score by Jerry Goldsmith. I've been getting more and more interested in film soundtracks/scores lately, so I've been noticing the music a lot more than I used to. I'm not going to say too much about this, other than the fact that I always enjoy re-watching this one. 

Image result for a patch of blue 1965

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently saw The Tempest, the one with Helen Mirren (as Prospera in this case). The production was heavy with CGI but I thought it looked pretty good. I haven't seen too many Tempests for compare but I was sufficiently entertained by this one.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, rayban said:

I saw a stage version of "The Tempest" at Lincoln Center Uptown that starred Sam Waterston and Carol Kane.

It was both enchanting and mesmerizing.

In high school, we watched the 80's direct-video version, filmed on a bare Elizabethan Globe-style stage with Ephram Zimbalist Jr. as Prospero, and as Stefano & Trinculo--the two comedy-relief clowns who think they're alone on the island and try to "rule" Caliban--David "Officer Tackleberry" Graf and Ron "Arnold Horschack" Pallilo.

For Lawence who can't get his feelings straight on it, BBC's Shakespeare Uncovered series did a surprising essay episode with Trevor Nunn analyzing the play from the perspective of an older Shakespeare facing retirement after his last play, and seeing his own daughter married off and leaving the nest.  The whole series is a good CliffNotes primer, but this one in particular was a good perspective to shoot down the snooty "Fakespeare" conspiracy theories about other playwrights.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

A PATCH OF BLUE (1965) *Score: 6/10*

Starring: Sidney Poitier, Elizabeth Hartman, Shelley Winters. 

I've seen this film before, and I'm actually quite fond of it. Hartman always impresses me as the young & abused blind girl, Selina, who befriends an African American man (Poitier). I also really enjoy the score by Jerry Goldsmith. I've been getting more and more interested in film soundtracks/scores lately, so I've been noticing the music a lot more than I used to. I'm not going to say too much about this, other than the fact that I always enjoy re-watching this one. 

One of my favorites. One of Poitier's best performances, Hartman was a revelation and Shelley Winters won a deserved Oscar as the worst mother in movie history. Goldsmith's gentle piano score was very touching. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Kapo (1960)  -  8/10

220px-Kapo_film.jpg

Italian Holocaust drama with Susan Strasberg as a teenage Jewish girl in France during the occupation.  She's soon sent to a concentration camp where she assumes the identity of a non-Jewish political prisoner, thus avoiding immediate execution. She's later sent to a women's work camp, where her desperation drives her to become a "kapo", a sort of trustee assigned to guard over her fellow prisoners, earning more food and creature comforts, but in exchange losing her humanity. Also featuring Emmanuelle Riva, Laurent Terzieff, Gianni Garko, Annabella Besi, Graziella Galvani, Paola Pitagora, and Didi Perego. Stark, brutal and emotionally devastating, with fantastic performances from Strasberg, Riva (as a sensitive prisoner), and Perego (as a tough-as-nails prisoner). The version I watched was mostly in Italian, but I understand that there's also an English-language dub.

Source: The Criterion Channel

Such a shame, this fine, but brutal film has fallen into oblivion.

At the time, Susan Strasberg, fresh off her Broadway triumph as Anne Frank, was such a big name.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/13/2019 at 10:33 AM, rayban said:

(in re: TEA AND SYMPATHY [1956] )

The famous play is about homosexuality -

the screen version is about homophobia -

 

That's a very perceptive comment.

I don't know how many times I have seen this movie in bits and pieces or one full sitting- Hell, I've even lived parts of it...

I may stand alone on this, but I bemoan the fact that the word "q u e e r" has been redefined and now has a heavy sexuality-defined context, even the positive reclamation of it years ago by the gay community irks me, because in the process we lost a REALLY EFFECTIVE TERM FOR DESCRIBING SOMETHING THAT IS (plainly and simply and independent of any concept of sexuality) JUST ****ING ODD.

and TEA AND SYMPATHY is one Q U E E R movie. As in just plainly and simply odd.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

That's a very perceptive comment.

I don't know how many times I have seen this movie in bits and pieces or one full sitting- Hell, I've even lived parts of it...

I may stand alone on this, but I bemoan the fact that the word "q u e e r" has been redefined and now has a heavy sexuality-defined context, even the positive reclamation of it years ago by the gay community irks me, because in the process we lost a REALLY EFFECTIVE TERM FOR DESCRIBING SOMETHING THAT IS (plainly and simply and independent of any concept of sexuality) JUST ****ING ODD.

and TEA AND SYMPATHY is one Q U E E R movie. As in just plainly and simply odd.

You must read the play - it might be the very essence of "queer".

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh God Help me, but I watched LITTLE OLD GREEK LADY STREET FIGHTER (filmed, obviously, in 1975 and released, barely I hope, in 1981 as LADY STREET FIGHTER, but my title is more appropriate) on TCM UNDERGROUND.

Someone's Yaya took a break from making Baklava for the church Bazaar to model a Hellish trousseau of ambitiously tacky and revealing outfits and, I don't know, run around in this series of blurry, badly filmed, and intriguingly dubbed images [shot, doubtlessly, without a single permit in the LA area] which make, I guess, a movie- the plot of which I don't really remember if there, in fact, was one.

she is like a profoundly untalented ANNA MAGNANI:

17402_1.jpg

she throws a couple of leg kicks here and there, but there is not much fighting and, as i recall, no street fighting.

she does get the crap kicked out of her on a public beach by her "love interest", A BAD LAB SIMULATION OF JOEL MCRAE that I kept expecting to turn to the camera and whisperhiss "kill me" at all times.

It is the VALHALLA of BAD ACTING, and I think quite a few of the actors learned their lines phone net ickily.

There is also a lot of disturbing abuse, SOME GIANT 1970'S CARS INCLUDING ONE WOOD PANELED STATION WAGON THAT HAD, I AM PRETTY SURE, IT'S OWN ZIP CODE, a synthesizer remix of the theme from THE GOOD THE BAD AND THE UGLY that I defy you to hear and get out of your head and some footage of the WINDOWS OF THE WORLD mall in HOLLYWOOD ca. 1975.

Everyone and everything in this is hideous.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, rayban said:

You must read the play - it might be the very essence of "queer".

I'd be genuinely intrigued to.

Maybe we're too far ahead societally now, but I've always thought TEA AND SYMPATHY deserved an HONEST remake.

(I'm sure the play HAS to be more straightforward than the movie, yes?)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I'd be genuinely intrigued to.

Maybe we're too far ahead societally now, but I've always thought TEA AND SYMPATHY deserved an HONEST remake.

(I'm sure the play HAS to be more straightforward than the movie, yes?)

When it was made as a film, it was too bold for the screen.

The fact that the husband was gay, and not Tom Lee, was such a revelation.

It upended everyday conceptions of what it meant to be "gay".

It should be re-made - with all of the original material that concerned Laura and her husband and his need for the young men in his house.

His homosexuality was almost beside-the-point - but it was very real.

When push came to shove, the young men were far more important than his wife.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, rayban said:

When it was made as a film, it was too bold for the screen.

The fact that the husband was gay, and not Tom Lee, was such a revelation.

It upended everyday conceptions of what it meant to be "gay".

It should be re-made - with all of the original material that concerned Laura and her husband and his need for the young men in his house.

His homosexuality was almost beside-the-point - but it was very real.

When push came to shove, the young men were far more important than his wife.

 

You want to hear something funny? I saw TEA AND SYMPATHY twice and it wasn't until I started reading reviews and trivia on the film THAT I (totally) REALIZED KERR'S HUSBAND IS SUPPOSED TO BE A CLOSET CASE!!! (and can totally see it now!)

And I think we'd all agree I'm pretty perceptive when it comes to that.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

You want to hear something funny? I saw TEA AND SYMPATHY twice and it wasn't until I started reading reviews and trivia on the film THAT I (totally) REALIZED KERR'S HUSBAND IS SUPPOSED TO BE A CLOSET CASE!!! (and can totally see it now!)

And I think we'd all agree I'm pretty perceptive when it comes to that.

If the film were re-made today - and remained faithful to the play - it would still be as controversial, I think, as the play in its' initial run.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/11/2019 at 8:39 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

Ed. note- my phone died last week, so i'm not able to post right after seeing a movie and have to recount to you the details the next day and my memory is NOTORIOUSLY SPOTTY, SO all apologies if I just RASHOMAN the Hell out of this one.

Also also, I can't review this one without giving away something kind of surprising that happens halfway through- so, spoilers kinda- although, I mean- THE TITLE KINDA LETS YOU IN ON WHAT TO EXPECT

divorcelobby07.jpgKay can work a hankie!

I went on a lark and watched DIVORCE (1945- MONOGRAM) With KAY FRANCIS as a WICKED ,multiple-divorcee who returns to her small town and wrecks the marriage of BRUCE CABOT and his wife. 

those of you who know the KAY FRANCIS story know that she was A HUGE STAR in the 30's who made a string of GLAMOROUS WOMEN'S "SUFFERING IN SATIN" PICS- she asked for a raise and WARNER'S punished her for it, ruining her career. she had a tragic time of it in the 40's, dealing with some substance issues and a horrific burn injury. I saw NONE OF THIS in her performance or her face- SHE LOOKED INCREDIBLE, and- as always- the fashions were about 98% of the film's shooting budget (and I hope KAY made off with a mink or two)

this was a B-movie at a B-Studio though, and (wardrobe aside)- almost everything about it is pretty Dollar General- including the script, which- to be honest- is what makes it so amusing.

for some reason- it seems quite apparent- that this one came in "under" the time to be considered a feature and needed some padding, so it starts with two BIZARRE vignettes where a JUDGE (in a suit, no robe) presides over a divorce court and in classic B-MOVIE JUDGE TRADITION, he takes the chance to berate and chastise all involved in the case for being such horrible failures as human beings (see also I ACCUSE MY PARENTS!)

AS I RECALL- the first case is of a woman who claims her husband abuses her and then she lists the reasons and they're all petty as Hell. The judge suggests the woman be flogged, takes of his shoe and hits her with it (ed note: again, as i recall it; i also took a muscle relaxer before going to bed, so grain of salt here)

the second case is a guy who claims his wife abuses him, THE WIFE IS NOT PRESENT IN THE COURTROOM AND THE JUDGE TOTALLY SIDES WITH THE GUY, but not before of course, extensively berating him for his failures as a Man.

then on to the plot, which is about small town real estate guy BRUCE CABOT and his two terminally adorable children that he has with his wife- who was played adequately by an actress i did not recognize.

his ex-girlfriend KAY FRANCIS moves back to town (she is also the absent abusive JEZEBEL wife referred to in the second vignette it turns out) they meet at a party, and she throws some business his way.

then there is AN UTTERLY DELICIOUS SCENE where KAY- in a FULL LENGTH MINK WITH 36 INCH SHOULDER PADS- marches right into their home, comes up to the wife and is all "HE'S MINE NOW, ***** DEAL WITH IT" and the wife turns to the husband and he's all "YUP 100%. I'M WHIPPED and WE DONE" (that's the ONE surprise, at least it was to me) and then KAY takes him by the arm, laughs like THE COUNT from SESAME STREET, there is a lightning bolt and a crash of thunder and off they go TOGETHER.

then we're back in ROY BEAN'S DIVORCE COURT, where the (same) judge (even though KAY's divorce happened in another town)- IN A HIGHLY ETHICAL AND TOTALLY LEGAL MOVE- asks the husband and wife for a private conference in his office where he orders them to get back together and they're all "nuh-uh" and he (shock!) CASTIGATES THEM and grants them a divorce and then THE IDIOT WIFE REFUSES ALIMONY which ARE YOU ****ING KIDDING ME WITH THIS?

She supports the kids by working in a dress shop (they have to let the black maid go, but Thank God they keep the Irish Stereotype Governess) while the husband balls it up with KAY and THEN FORGETS ABOUT THE FAMILY ENTIRELY!

This was a highly entertaining movie with a seriously cornball third act. As bad as the dialogue is, KAY plows through it like she's back working with LUBITSCH- silly as the part is, she gives it her IN NAME ONLY best and she looks, at times, like a cobra ready to pounce.

I thought Kay was the only good thing in the film. Strained credibility that she'd go ga-ga over stolid Bruce Cabot (who looked like he'd aged 25 years since King Kong!) Hated the kids, the wife and the "court martial proceedings". Some good lines here and there, but overall a dud. (At least it was brief!) Definitely not PRO DIVORCE! LOL.

Did anyone wind up getting a divorce from that judge? LOL. I sure wouldn't want  him judging my case!

It was Helen Mack who played the put upon wife. (I know HUGE LOL over the alimony refusal. What a saint!)

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Bait (1954) another Hugo Haas cheapie noir

Bait Poster

With a prolog that features Cedric Hardwicke as the devil no less.

Haas is a miner looking for a lost mine that he and his deceased partner had once found in a valley of former diggings. He acquires a younger partner John Agar (a lot of westerns including Fort Apache (1948), a lot of SyFy, Attack of the Puppet People,  The Brain from Planet ArousThe Mole PeopleJourney to the Seventh Planet and TV), to help with the search and the mine when they find it.

Haas also gets hitched to soiled dove Cleo Moore (On Dangerous Ground, 711 Ocean Drive), and other Noirs so that he can get rid of both Moore and Agar when they fall in love with each other. It's all part of his plan to get all the gold for himself. Watchable 6/10

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

movie-tickets

Leave No Trace. 2018. Directed by Debra Granik. With Ben Foster, Thomasin McKenzie.

A homeless veteran (Will) and his daughter (Tom) live illegally in a public Park. They are discovered and placed in the care of Social Services. Tom is unwilling to adapt to his new environment, but Tom wants to be independent.

Excellent and subtly powerful movie, with great performances by the two leads and Dale Dickey in a small role.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Murder in the First (1995) Kevin Bacon, Christian Slater, Gary Oldman (from IMDb) Henri Young stole five dollars from a post office and ended up going to prison - to the most famous, or infamous, prison of them all: Alcatraz. He tried to escape, failed, and spent three years and two months in solitary confinement - in a dungeon, with no light, no heat and no toilet. Milton Glenn, the assistant warden, who was given free reign by his duty-shirking superior, was responsible for Young's treatment. 

It's very loosely based on the life of Henri Young. The real guy was already doing time for bank robbery and murder.

Entertaining still 7/10

Murder in the First Poster

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Murder in the First (1995) Kevin Bacon, Christian Slater, Gary Oldman

Wow that's an impressive & strong cast!

I like how it sounds like the accused received inhumane punishment over such a small offense; stealing $5 from a Post Office. His previous offense -murdering another human being- is mentioned like a footnote! Could his attempted escape contributed to his declining accommodation in prison?

Sounds like the guy doesn't know how to behave in public OR in prison. 

That said, the prison system is heavily regulated to provide clean, decent accommodations. Even those in solitary must receive an hour rec time & shower time every day and some inmates refuse the opportunity.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Murder in the First (1995) Kevin Bacon, Christian Slater, Gary Oldman (from IMDb) Henri Young stole five dollars from a post office and ended up going to prison - to the most famous, or infamous, prison of them all: Alcatraz. He tried to escape, failed, and spent three years and two months in solitary confinement - in a dungeon, with no light, no heat and no toilet. Milton Glenn, the assistant warden, who was given free reign by his duty-shirking superior, was responsible for Young's treatment. 

It's very loosely based on the life of Henri Young. The real guy was already doing time for bank robbery and murder.

Entertaining still 7/10

Murder in the First Poster

Terrific movie, Kevin Bacon should have received an Oscar nomination.,

Years later, it opened Off-Broadway as a stage play.

It was well-received.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Apology for Murder (1945) Ann Savage, Hugh Beaumont, Charles D. Brown, and Russell Hicks, sort of a poor man's Double Indemnity. The angle this go round is Savage the overly greedy "widow" conspires with Beaumont a newspaper man. 

Apology for Murder Poster

An OK time waster it's streaming at the moment at a popular site 😎

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...