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I watched two movies this week that couldn't be more different-

First, I watched THE CHOPPING MALL '86 found on free channel TubiTV. It's a typical 80's teen horror film of kids trapped in a shopping mall after hours. Since I sometimes work for malls -always after hours- this theme appeals to me. I wasn't impressed with the "horror" being security robots that malfunction and attack the kids, just awful. I'm much more frightened of humans or supernatural villains than robots. The good part was there was little blood & gore we would have seen a decade later. I only fast forwarded through one scene taking place in an air shaft because of claustrophobia. Overall it was stupid & silly but it at least kept my attention. One teen was played by future EATING RAOUL '82 star & director the late Paul Bartel.

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I borrowed the Criterion Collection of IL SORPASSO '62 an Italian Buddy Road Trip type movie, made in Italy. I was prompted by a post in "funniest movie you ever saw" thread here on this board.

It's a pretty basic story of two very different guys-one a serious unassuming French student (played byJean Louis Trintgnant) and his polar opposite-a boisterous, wild Italian never-do-well (Vittorio Gassman) driving a teeny convertible sports car.

You see all sorts of glorious Italian scenery as they travel by and beautiful little snippets of Italian life in the 60's, presumably not very different than earlier generations. You see roadside restaurants, beaches, resorts and just Italians acting in a natural, personal way...which is the beauty of the film for me, much more than the story itself.

There is always tension between the two principles, but the Gassman character always prevails. The car itself is somewhat of a character, with a funny musical horn to signal "we're passing" keeping with the theme (and title) of the story. While I didn't laugh at all throughout this movie, I did enjoy it. I found Gassman abrasive at first, but stuck with it (sorry, bad pun) just for the RIDE. I didn't find it LOL funny, nor really funny at all, but instead it struck me as somewhat tragic, a metaphor for the road of life and the attitude you bring to it. I'm glad I saw this & have recommended it to my classic movie friends.

220px-Il_sorpasso.jpg

 

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27 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

I watched two movies this week that couldn't be more different-

First, I watched THE CHOPPING MALL '86 found on free channel TubiTV. It's a typical 80's teen horror film of kids trapped in a shopping mall after hours. Since I sometimes work for malls -always after hours- this theme appeals to me. I wasn't impressed with the "horror" being security robots that malfunction and attack the kids, just awful. I'm much more frightened of humans or supernatural villains than robots. The good part was there was little blood & gore we would have seen a decade later. I only fast forwarded through one scene taking place in an air shaft because of claustrophobia. Overall it was stupid & silly but it at least kept my attention. One teen was played by future EATING RAOUL '82 star & director the late Paul Bartel.

220px-Choppingmall.jpg

I borrowed the Criterion Collection of IL SORPASSO '62 an Italian Buddy Road Trip type movie, made in Italy. I was prompted by a post in "funniest movie you ever saw" thread here on this board.

It's a pretty basic story of two very different guys-one a serious unassuming French student (played byJean Louis Trintgnant) and his polar opposite-a boisterous, wild Italian never-do-well (Vittorio Gassman) driving a teeny convertible sports car.

You see all sorts of glorious Italian scenery as they travel by and beautiful little snippets of Italian life in the 60's, presumably not very different than earlier generations. You see roadside restaurants, beaches, resorts and just Italians acting in a natural, personal way...which is the beauty of the film for me, much more than the story itself.

There is always tension between the two principles, but the Gassman character always prevails. The car itself is somewhat of a character, with a funny musical horn to signal "we're passing" keeping with the theme (and title) of the story. While I didn't laugh at all throughout this movie, I did enjoy it. I found Gassman abrasive at first, but stuck with it (sorry, bad pun) just for the RIDE. I didn't find it LOL funny, nor really funny at all, but instead it struck me as somewhat tragic, a metaphor for the road of life and the attitude you bring to it. I'm glad I saw this & have recommended it to my classic movie friends.

220px-Il_sorpasso.jpg

 

I love this film.  It is one of my favorites. 

If I remember correctly, here, it was called "The Easy Life".

Vittorio Gassman was a knockout.

It's a far cry from his Hollywood flick, "Rhapsody".

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The Devil Bat (1941) 5/10

Image result for the devil bat imagesHere is a film for really dedicated Lugosi fans. It cannot compare to his 1930s Universal classics but better than most of his Poverty Row films of the 1940s and 1950s. He plays a mad scientists who invents a shaving lotion that attracts his giant killer bat to attack his victims. Bela gets some good lines that only he can deliver. The only other interesting thing about this one is Dave O'Brien as the reporter hero of the film. Most TCM fans today will recognize him as the goofball character in the numerous Pete Smith Specialty short films shown frequently on the channel. Cult film fans will also remember him as one of the guffawing pot heads in "Reefer Madness". One thing that I find striking about him is the uncanny resemblance he has to the later 1960s and 1970s character actor James Olson. 

Dave O'BrienRelated image

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The Marriage-Go-Round (1961)  -  6/10

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Comedy starring James Mason and Susan Hayward as married university professors who lecture on marriage customs around the world, and who consider themselves forward-thinking and open-minded. However, their matrimonial bliss is challenged when the daughter (Julie Newmar) of family friends from Sweden arrives on their doorstep. She says that it's just a friendly visit, but soon confides in Mason that she's there in hopes that Mason will impregnate her. Also featuring Robert Paige, June Clayworth, and Joe Kirkwood Jr. This had been a stage hit, with Newmar reprising her Tony-winning role. She looks incredible, and her acting is good, accent and all. Hayward and Mason have some good banter with each other, too.

Source: internet

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The Mask (1961)  -  6/10

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This is called the first Canadian horror film. I don't know if that's correct, but I liked it. Paul Stevens stars as a psychiatrist who feels guilt after a patient dies. The now-dead man worked in antiquities and had recently acquired a mysterious mask that he claimed had sinister mystical attributes. The patient had mailed the mask to the doctor, who decides to try it on, only to discover that his patient was right. Also featuring Claudette Nevins, Bill Walker, Anne Collings, Martin Lavut, Leo Leyden, and Norman Ettinger. When originally released, audience members were given 3D glasses in the shape of small masks, and they were prompted to don them whenever the mask is worn onscreen. They were treated to nightmarish sequences in 3D. These are the best parts of the film, featuring foggy ruins filled with corpse-like people, masked killers, and human sacrifice. The rest of the movie is rather unmemorable, but the nightmares/hallucinations caused by the mask make this a worth-see for horror enthusiasts. The version I watched had the 3D sequences intact, and luckily I had some old cardboard 3D glasses laying around. 

Source: internet

f6bea74d564694ddd515730fc2c533e6.jpg

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FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION (2006)//A MIGHTY WIND (2003) *Score: 6/10 & 5/10*

Casts: Eugene Levy, Catherine O'Hara, Parker Posey, Ed Begley, Jr., Rachael Harris, Michael McKean, Christopher Guest, Bob Balaban, John Michael Higgins, Jane Lynch, Jennifer Coolidge, Fred Willard, Larry Miller, Paul Dooley, Michael Hitchcock. 

Monday and Tuesday evening, I watched both of these Christopher Guest mockumentaries. I have been a fan of his for a little while now, and wanted to give these a try, as I had never seen them before. I must say I preferred "Best in Show" and "Waiting for Guffman," but these were definitely still watchable. 

For Your Consideration:

This centers around an independent Jewish film that is being filmed and produced, and the Oscar rumors surrounding it. 3 of the major cast members believe that they will be nominated for Academy awards for this film, and this results in inflated egos and radical character changes. Eugene Levy and Catherine O'Hara are certainly a match made in heaven; I enjoy seeing them together in Guest's films, as well as on the current tv show: "Schitt's Creek." 

Image result for for your consideration 2006

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Image result for for your consideration 2006

A Mighty Wind:

Several folk singers/groups band together (pun intended) in order to pay homage to their late manager. I wasn't as invested in this one as "For Your Consideration," but I still enjoyed it. I honestly find Fred Willard so funny in all of these movies. Everyone is fantastic, but for some reason, he makes me laugh the most. 

Image result for a mighty wind 2003

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The Mongols (1961)  -  5/10

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Italian epic featuring Jack Palance as Ogatai, the bloodthirsty son of Genghis Khan, leader of the Mongol Hordes. Their conquests have led them all the way to Eastern Europe, so Poland sends their hero Stepen of Krakow (Franco Silva) to try and make peace with the Mongols before they invade. Also featuring Anita Ekberg as Ogatai's woman, Antonella Lualdi, Gabriella Pallotta, Pierre Cressoy, Gabriele Antonini, Gianni Garko, George Wang, Lawrence Montaigne, and Roldano Lupi as Genghis Khan. There's little historical accuracy, but I wasn't expecting much, either. Palance is unhinged, sweaty, and breathes really hard. Ekberg sticks out like...well, Anita Ekberg in a movie about Mongols. There are a few rousing action scenes, but not enough, and there are many boring patches throughout the 115 minute running time. Maybe it has something to do with the three credited directors: Andre De Toth, Leopolda Savona, and Riccardo Freda.

Source: internet

I_mongoli_(film).jpg

franco_anita.jpg

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1 hour ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Eugene Levy and Catherine O'Hara are certainly a match made in heaven; I enjoy seeing them together in Guest's films, as well as on the current tv show: "Schitt's Creek." 

O'Hara was terrific in For Your Consideration--you know, she was nominated for several 'lesser awards' for the role, which led to 'talk' about an Oscar nom...life imitating art 😎

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The Naked Edge (1961)  -  6/10

220px-Poster_of_the_movie_The_Naked_Edge

British-American suspense drama featuring Deborah Kerr as the wife of American businessman Gary Cooper, both living in London. Cooper's boss was murdered and a large amount of cash stolen, but Cooper supposedly caught the culprit before he could escape. He testifies in court, and the man (Ray McAnally) is convicted. Cooper soon uses a stock windfall to go into lucrative business with Michael Wilding, and they all prosper. Several years later, Kerr discovers a blackmail letter threatening to accuse Cooper of the murder from years ago, and while he denies guilt, Kerr isn't certain, and she's always wondered where he really got that money for his business deal, as the stolen loot was never recovered... Also featuring Peter Cushing, Hermione Gingold, Eric Portman, Ronald Howard, Wilfrid Lawson, and Diane Cilento. 

This is mainly remembered for being Cooper's final film. He was seriously ill while filming, and he looks uncomfortable through most of it, which actually fits with the role. Kerr is the main character, though, and she does well as the increasingly worried and paranoid wife. The supporting cast is excellent, but Michael Anderson's direction lacks pace or verve. This was a flop when released, but it's not that bad, and many stars had much, much worse final films.

Source: internet

the-naked-edge-7-cliffe.png

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5 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Marriage-Go-Round (1961)  -  6/10

Comedy starring James Mason and Susan Hayward

*Twilight Zone Theme*

I was named after Susan Hayward, born the same day as James Mason in 1961 and my job is restoring merry go rounds. I'm about 6/10 good as well.

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Funny. But I found the movie mostly unfunny and dull. I'm sure the play was racier. Maybe if Colbert and Boyer had repeated their roles it might have been funnier (but maybe not).

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5 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Mask (1961)  -  6/10

220px-Maskpost1.jpg

This is called the first Canadian horror film. I don't know if that's correct, but I liked it. Paul Stevens stars as a psychiatrist who feels guilt after a patient dies. The now-dead man worked in antiquities and had recently acquired a mysterious mask that he claimed had sinister mystical attributes. The patient had mailed the mask to the doctor, who decides to try it on, only to discover that his patient was right. Also featuring Claudette Nevins, Bill Walker, Anne Collings, Martin Lavut, Leo Leyden, and Norman Ettinger. When originally released, audience members were given 3D glasses in the shape of small masks, and they were prompted to don them whenever the mask is worn onscreen. They were treated to nightmarish sequences in 3D. These are the best parts of the film, featuring foggy ruins filled with corpse-like people, masked killers, and human sacrifice. The rest of the movie is rather unmemorable, but the nightmares/hallucinations caused by the mask make this a worth-see for horror enthusiasts. The version I watched had the 3D sequences intact, and luckily I had some old cardboard 3D glasses laying around. 

Source: internet

f6bea74d564694ddd515730fc2c533e6.jpg

A similar still is on the cover of Incredibly Strange Films

Image result for Incredibly Strange Films

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Nefertiti, Queen of the Nile (1961)  -  5/10

220px-Nefertiti,_Queen_of_the_Nile.jpg

More Italian "history" lessons, this time with Jeanne Crain as the famed Egyptian queen, forced to marry the mad pharaoh Amenophis IV (Amedeo Nazzari), although she really loves the pharaoh's best pal, sculptor Tumos (Edmund Purdom). Meanwhile, scheming High Priest Benakon (Vincent Price) plots to stop an outbreak of religious heresy, as the many gods of the Egyptian pantheon are ignored in favor of the one god Aten. Also featuring Liana Orfei as a sexy dancing girl, Carlo D'Angelo, Alberto Farnese, and Clelia Matania. The costumes are good and the sets okay, but the script is lousy, the casting is silly (these are the palest Egyptians ever committed to film), and so the end result is barely passable.

Source: Amazon Prime Video

1mNcaKYdyxxHzzYXpAjJlXULcaF.jpg

619full-nefertiti,-queen-of-the-nile-scr

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No Love for Johnnie (1961)  -  7/10

220px-No_Love_for_Johnnie_FilmPoster.jpe

British drama starring Peter Finch as a Labour Party MP who has just won re-election. However, he's grown lazy, jaded, and complacent, and almost immediately begins shirking his duties. As his life begins to crumble around him (his wife leaves him, the party apparatus start to push him away, and his constituency want to remove him from office), he starts a May-December romance with 20-year-old model Pauline (Mary Peach). Also featuring Billie Whitelaw, Stanley Holloway Donald Pleasence, Hugh Burden, Rosalie Crutchley, Michael Goodliffe, Mervyn Johns, Geoffrey Keen, Paul Rogers, Dennis Price, Peter Sallis, and Oliver Reed. This character-study and examination of British political structure is a triumph for Peter Finch, who won the third of his five BAFTAs for his role. He's a complicated character, not really likable, but human, and three-dimensional. I was also impressed with Billie Whitelaw as an upstairs neighbor who has fond feelings for Finch, while he seems oblivious to her advances. 

Source: YouTube

 

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The Eye Creatures (1965) & Creature of Destruction (1967)  - both  2/10

220px-Eye_Creatures.jpg        MV5BYTRhMzZiZjYtMmZlMC00MzQxLWEwOWYtOTQw

American International Pictures approached Texas filmmaker Larry Buchanan with an offer: remake a bunch of their old catalog titles, in color and to be sold directly to television, for $10,000 a picture, and Larry could keep whatever money was left over. He then began to produce some of the worst movies ever made. I just watched the last two that I had not seen.

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The Eye Creatures was the first of these remakes, this one of Invasion of the Saucer Men. John Ashley stars as a teenager who gets to battle the ugly title aliens, with help from other local teens and some dimbulb Air Force soldiers. Every fundamental aspect of filmmaking is forgotten in this horrific monstrosity, which features awful writing, cinematography, editing, sound, acting, special effects, and sets. I bet even the food was terrible. This is the kind of movie where it looks like it smelled bad on set.

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Creature of Destruction is only infinitesimally better. A remake of The She-Creature, this features Les Tremayne as a stage mentalist who warns his audience that a savage monster will attack someone that night. When an incident does occur, it brings more spectators to the next show, and some begin to wonder if the mentalist may be behind it all. A young Air Force officer (Aron Kincaid) thinks it may have something to do with the mentalist's strange female assistant (Pat Delany). Also featuring Neil Fletcher, Annabelle Weenick, and songs by Scotty McKay. Cheap and dumb, with an old and tired Les Tremayne going through the motions, this is as sad as it is bad. The monster costume is one of the worst in film history.

Source: I believe that one or both of these are available in Mystery Science Theater 3000 editions, and those may be your best bet. I watched them straight and unfiltered (both titles are available on YouTube), but novices are warned that watching these movies original and uncut can be hazardous to your health (mental & spiritual), so you may wish to have supervision and/or some large amounts of alcohol or drugs available. Always check with your doctor before starting a Larry Buchanan movie.

 

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On Wednesday my mom turned off a horror movie Ben Mankiewicz said contained a scene so awful it should have a warning bell so the faint of heart could look away.  What was the movie, and did they actually sound any warning or did he just say that?  Thanks.

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3 hours ago, CoriSCapnSkip said:

On Wednesday my mom turned off a horror movie Ben Mankiewicz said contained a scene so awful it should have a warning bell so the faint of heart could look away.  What was the movie, and did they actually sound any warning or did he just say that?  Thanks.

"Terror Is A Man" (1959) a horror movie filmed in the Philippines inspired by "Island Of Dr Moreau" . There was a warning at the beginning of the film that there was a scene in it not for the squeamish. A warning bell would sound when it was coming up. I did not see it but read that is was a close up of a surgical incision. 

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Lawrence: Are you going to be getting to any of Maury Dexter's movies?  Several of them have showed up on FXM, and they range from interestingly mediocre to hilariously awful, and they're from around the time you're up to.

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On 4/19/2019 at 8:03 AM, TomJH said:

I  have to admit, I'm afraid, that I haven't seen that much of Diana Rigg's post-Avengers work.

Having said that, she is a glorious scene stealer as the self centred, delightfully ****y show biz star in Evil Under the Sun. I particularly love this scene, one of the highlight moments of the film, I feel, when she decides to entertain those at the holiday resort with her rendition of a Cole Porter hit only to have Maggie Smith do whatever she can to upstage her. Rigg's combination of style and ****iness only makes me wish she had been in the film more. She was my favourite performer in the all star film.

 

Wow, one forgets how gorgeous these two grand dames of British film and theater were!   

 

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On 4/23/2019 at 6:25 PM, rayban said:

I wish that I had seen all of the Comedies and Proverbs and the six Moral Tales.

I am most familiar with "My Night at Maud's" and "Claire's Knee".

I haven’t seen all of them either.  From the Six Moral Tales, I’ve seen My Night at Maud’s, Claire’s Knee and Chloe in the Afternoon. The last film from Comedies and Proverbs I saw was The Green Ray, which I loved.

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On 4/23/2019 at 3:43 PM, LawrenceA said:

Il Posto (1961)  -  8/10

220px-Il_Posto_DVD.jpg

Italian drama about a young man (Sandro Panseri) who ventures out into the working world of Milan. He applies for a job at a huge corporation, for which he takes a battery of tests. He meets and falls for a young woman (Loredana Detto) who has also applied. However, it doesn't take long for the young man to realize the dull, banal life that he has locked himself into. Director Ermanno Olmi uses some Neo-Realist touches to add verisimilitude to the drab, gray world that the young man faces. Authentic, appealing performances from the two leads help cement the shambling narrative, and keep things from becoming too dreary. In fact, there's a distinct vein of black comedy running throughout. Recommended.

Source: TCM

This film stayed with me for a while.  The sequence at the club, with the festive air of New Year’s Eve, as Domenico waits, and waits, for his date, was mesmerizing. The ending was quietly powerful, and somewhat Kafkaesque. A great film indeed.

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15 hours ago, Hibi said:

Funny. But I found the movie mostly unfunny and dull. I'm sure the play was racier. Maybe if Colbert and Boyer had repeated their roles it might have been funnier (but maybe not).

You talking about THE MARRIAGE-GO-ROUND?

If you are, +1 me on that.

Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.....

edit- okay, now I see you were (sorry, been absent and scrolling back)

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On 4/24/2019 at 9:14 AM, Det Jim McLeod said:

The Devil Bat (1941) 5/10

Here is a film for really dedicated Lugosi fans. It cannot compare to his 1930s Universal classics but better than most of his Poverty Row films of the 1940s and 1950s. He plays a mad scientists who invents a shaving lotion that attracts his giant killer bat to attack his victims. Bela gets some good lines that only he can deliver. The only other interesting thing about this one is Dave O'Brien as the reporter hero of the film. Most TCM fans today will recognize him as the goofball character in the numerous Pete Smith Specialty short films shown frequently on the channel. Cult film fans will also remember him as one of the guffawing pot heads in "Reefer Madness". One thing that I find striking about him is the uncanny resemblance he has to the later 1960s and 1970s character actor James Olson. 

 

I adore this film, have ever since I rented the VHS cassette at age 8 or so. There is not finite number of times I can watch it.

Although I do have to wonder, after Pearl Harbor, where did people order their giant taxidermy bats from? (since I assume it was less-than-socially-acceptable to get a Japanese Imported one?)

furthermore, I can only imagine what it was like to be alive on the evening of December 8, 1941, when the flames from the giant town-square bonfires of Japanese-imported taxidermy giant bats filled their skies from coast-to-coast with their unearthly glow and HIGHLY noxious fumes.

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