Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

On ‎5‎/‎29‎/‎2019 at 7:06 PM, CinemaInternational said:

Speaking of AMC, for one reason of another, I popped in a personal DVD copy of Vertigo this afternoon, and looked at portions of the film, and at the 30 minute documentary (done in 1997) on the disc, which started by saying it was an AMC original production, back in the days when they were still commercial free.

AMC regularly featured the "Backstory" series, half-hour mini-docs about the making of important, or at least interesting films. Fox DVD releases of some of those films have included them as extras. They were highly entertaining and usually pretty informative. AMC is barely worth talking about today as a source of classic film, but at it's height it was the best and basically used the format TCM uses today. I'm glad I saw so many Universal and Paramount films on AMC when I did, because if I were depending on TCM today to see them I'd still be in the dark.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

"The Man With The Cloak" - Fletcher Markle - 1951 -

starring Joseph Cotton, Barbara Stanwyck, Louis Calhern, Leslie Caron, Joe De Santis, etc.

Heated literary nonsense, I suppose, about a middle-aged penniless man, Edgar Allan Poe, who becomes involved in a life situation that verges on murder -

Discarded mistress (Stanwyck) still lives with her elderly lover (Calhern) -

she becomes involved with the butler -

they plot to indulge Calhern's appetites so that he'll have a stroke -

and leave his vast estate to Stanwyck -

enter young Frenchwoman (Caron) who's involved with Calhern's nephew back in France -

she wants money to finance her boyfriend's political activities -

muddying the mix is Stanwyck's unexpected yen for Cotton, who is receptive, too -

it all boils over into a melodramatic mix in which everyone gets what he/she wants -

with Calhern making a new will, trying to kill himself and killing the doctor by mistake -

Cotton finds the new will in the fireplace (?) -

Caron gets the money -

Stanwyck and the household help get the property -

and Cotton goes on to immortal fame -

it's a well-done thriller -

but it bubbles over with emotion -

if you like it "hot", you'll like this one -

the cast is impressive -

the standout is Stanwyck, who is so obsessive, she's scary -  

     p7341_i_h12_ab.jpg?d=270x360&q=50

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hamlet (1964)  -  7/10

1158950830_1554.jpg

Filmed, or rather videotaped, performance of the Broadway production of Shakespeare's play. Richard Burton stars as the Danish prince who plots revenge against his mother and uncle for the murder of his father. Also featuring Hume Cronyn as Polonius, Alfred Drake as Claudius, Eileen Herlie as Gertrude, Linda Marsh as Ophelia, John Cullum as Laertes, George Voskovec as the Player King, William Redfield as Guildenstern, Clement Fowler as Rosencrantz, and Barnard Hughes as Marcellus. John Gielgud, who staged and directed the play, also provides the off-stage voice of the Ghost.

Running a cool 3 hours and 10 minutes, this presentation is the opposite of the Russian version I watched last night. This strips away the visual, and focuses completely on the text. It's presented as a sort of dress rehearsal, with the performers wearing street clothes, and the sets bare and virtually nonexistent. Burton is good, although he's said to have detested this recording, made over several days from several performances in front of live audiences, and then edited together seamlessly. I thought Hume Cronyn stole the show, and wasn't surprised to learn that he won the Tony that year for his performance. For some reason, there was a contractual stipulation that after the theatrical run, all prints and negatives of this were to be destroyed, and the film was thought lost for a long time, until a single copy was found in the possession of...Richard Burton.

Source: YouTube

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, DougieB said:

AMC regularly featured the "Backstory" series, half-hour mini-docs about the making of important, or at least interesting films. Fox DVD releases of some of those films have included them as extras. They were highly entertaining and usually pretty informative. AMC is barely worth talking about today as a source of classic film, but at it's height it was the best and basically used the format TCM uses today. I'm glad I saw so many Universal and Paramount films on AMC when I did, because if I were depending on TCM today to see them I'd still be in the dark.

And Fox, back before Fox tried to beef up its own movie channel--
Backstory had some good mini-doc episodes on Cleopatra, The Seven Year Itch, and The Omen, back when those were regularly rotating on old-school AMC, and think the Cleopatra one ended up on the disk?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Beg, Borrow ... or Steal Poster

A 1973 TV movie of the week, I have been searching for it for 46 years and finally it's on Youtube. It's about 3 handicapped men who plan a jewel heist in a museum. 7/10

The stars are paraplegic Mike Connors, blind Kent McCord and hook handed Michael Cole. It has some suspenseful "will they pull it off?" and "will they get caught?" moments. The story doesn't really matter, the real treat is seeing private eye Joe Mannix, "Adam-12's" Officer Jim Reed and "Mod Squad" cop Pete Cochran on the other side of the law for once. I had met Kent McCord at an autograph show about 20 years ago and he had fond memories of his co stars and this film. He said he knew Mike Connors for many years and was a stunt double for him on the 1966 version of "Stagecoach".  Anybody else recall this movie?

 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Basket Case (1982)  Comedy, Horror. Directed and written by Frank Henenlotter. Starring Kevin Van Hentenryck, Terri Susan Smith, Beverly Bonner, Robert Vogel, Diana Browne, Lloyd Pace, Bill Freeman, Joe Clarke, Ruth Neuman and a seedy Times Square Hotel.

Basket Case Poster

Duane Bradley and his severely deformed Siamese twin basket case brother come to New York City to get revenge on the doctors that separated them. It deserves it's cult reputation. Nice claymation sequences. Absurdly funny. The SWV Image Bluray is excellent. 7/10

On Amazon Prime for those wanting to peek.

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Basket Case (1982)  Comedy, Horror. Directed and written by Frank Henenlotter.

The two sequels weren't as good, but are still amusing in a cheap, seedy kind of way. I enjoyed Henenlotter's other films Brain Damage and Frankenhooker. He took a 17 year break after Basket Case 3 before making Bad Biology, which wasn't as bad as I expected, but still isn't something I'd recommend. 

Henenlotter will always have my respect for his work in preserving and promoting older exploitation films, both on his own and in conjunction with Something Weird video.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Hamlet (1964)  -  7/10

It's presented as a sort of dress rehearsal, with the performers wearing street clothes, and the sets bare and virtually nonexistent. Burton is good, although he's said to have detested this recording, made over several days from several performances in front of live audiences, and then edited together seamlessly. I thought Hume Cronyn stole the show, and wasn't surprised to learn that he won the Tony that year for his performance. For some reason, there was a contractual stipulation that after the theatrical run, all prints and negatives of this were to be destroyed, and the film was thought lost for a long time, until a single copy was found in the possession of...Richard Burton.

Looking through my parents' scrapbooks as a kid, I'd found a ticket for this--It was one of the three "Theatrofilms" (along with "The TAMI Show"), but I was under the impression it was shown as more of a Fathom-style video event than a theatrical film?

(I'd heard the Burton-Cronyn version on an LP, and yes, Hume Cronyn is one of the great defining Poloniuses...Even over Ian Holm in the Mel Gibson version.)

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hamlet at Elsinore (1964)  -  7/10

3ca691bb478e9b262d79f7dbe7bf3dfa--shakes

BBC/Danish TV co-production of Shakespeare's play. Christopher Plummer stars as the Danish prince who plots revenge against his mother and uncle for the murder of his father. Featuring Robert Shaw as Claudius, June Tobin as Gertrude, Jo Maxwell Muller as Ophelia, Alec Clunes as Polonius, Dyson Lovell as Laertes, Michael Caine as Horatio, Roy Kinnear as the Gravedigger, Steven Berkoff as Lucianus, and Donald Sutherland as Fortinbras. This version runs 2 hours and 52 minutes, and is noteworthy for a few reasons. It was filmed on location in Denmark, and as such is presented more as a cinematic experience versus a theatrical one. I thought Plummer was only passable, and that both Muller and Lovell, as Ophelia and Laertes respectively, were rather weak. However, Robert Shaw is terrific as Claudius, probably the best, or second best, that I've seen in the role. I also felt that Hamlet's relationship to Horatio was more prominent, with them displaying more love and admiration for each other than anyone else. Donald Sutherland, in one of his first roles, doesn't appear until the very end.

Source: YouTube

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

And yes, that means that I've spent the last 8 and a half hours of my movie time watching versions of Hamlet. Truly a test for the ages.

Only one thing will assuage my exhausted psyche - Hercules!

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

And yes, that means that I've spent the last 8 and a half hours of my movie time watching versions of Hamlet. Truly a test for the ages.

Only one thing will assuage my exhausted psyche - Hercules!

It may not be the complete escape from the gloomy Dane you wish it to be, Lawrence.

Heracles-Myth-movie-h2.jpg

"To flex or not to flex . . ."

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hercules Against Rome (1964)  -  6/10

220px-Ercole-contro-roma-italian-movie-p

Italian action-adventure with Alan Steel (actually Italian Sergio Ciani) as Hercules (or the son, or the grandson, or the great-grandson of Hercules, I'm not sure, but either way, his name is Hercules!), who travels from his home in Greece to Rome in order to help the current emperor Gordiano (Carlo Tamberlani) and his daughter Ulpia (Wandisa Guida) from the evil plots of Praetorian Guard commander Fillipo Afro (Daniele Vargas). Also featuring Livio Lorenzon, Dina De Santis, and Tullio Altamura. Big slab-o'-beef Steel isn't the most emotive muscleman star in the genre, but he's believable when doing the physical stunts. He gets to break some chains, smash a lot of furniture, push a big rock off a cliff, and in one memorable scene, beat up a bunch of guys using a mounted battering ram. 

Source: YouTube

alansteel1207228484.jpg?w=1000

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Henenlotter will always have my respect for his work in preserving and promoting older exploitation films, both on his own and in conjunction with Something Weird video.

Has TCM ever shown Basket Case? is the question, Nipzoid is missing out on a classic! 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Hercules Against Rome (1964)  -  6/10

220px-Ercole-contro-roma-italian-movie-p

Italian action-adventure with Alan Steel (actually Italian Sergio Ciani) as Hercules (or the son, or the grandson, or the great-grandson of Hercules, I'm not sure, but either way, his name is Hercules!), who travels from his home in Greece to Rome in order to help the current emperor Gordiano (Carlo Tamberlani) and his daughter Ulpia (Wandisa Guida) from the evil plots of Praetorian Guard commander Fillipo Afro (Daniele Vargas). Also featuring Livio Lorenzon, Dina De Santis, and Tullio Altamura. Big slab-o'-beef Steel isn't the most emotive muscleman star in the genre, but he's believable when doing the physical stunts. He gets to break some chains, smash a lot of furniture, push a big rock off a cliff, and in one memorable scene, beat up a bunch of guys using a mounted battering ram. 

Source: YouTube

alansteel1207228484.jpg?w=1000

 

There were a lot of these on one of the local NY TV stations in the late 50s Hercules along with the similar Machiste films.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, cigarjoe said:

 

There were a lot of these on one of the local NY TV stations in the late 50s Hercules along with the similar Machiste films.

A lot of what got released here as Hercules movies were actually Maciste in Italy, or Ursus, Samson, Achilles, Ulysses, Goliath, Thor, Vulcan, etc. And then there's the Son of Hercules, and on and on.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hercules, Prisoner of Evil (1964)  -  5/10

image.png

Italian action-adventure fantasy with British bodybuilding champ Reg Park as Hercules (actually Ursus in the original Italian language version). Hercules battles against the evil Prince Zerah (Furio Meniconi) and the witch Amiko (Mireille Granelli), the latter of whom uses her magical powers to turn men into bloodthirsty werewolves. Also featuring Ettore Manni, Maria Teresa Orsini, Lilly Mantovani, and Nino Fuscagni. Reg Park is probably my favorite Hercules, with the possible exception of Steve Reeves, and Park's other films that I've seen (Hercules in the Haunted WorldHercules Conquers AtlantisSamson in King Solomon's Mines) are enjoyably crazy. He loses the beard here. Granelli is beautiful, and the pseudo-horror angle makes this a bit more interesting.

Source: YouTube

60e281d1001f5c2c905b505a9dc94116.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Intentions of Murder (1964)  -  7/10

220px-Unholy_Desire_1964.jpg

Japanese drama from director Shohei Imamura. Sadako (Masumi Harakawa) is the young, slightly dim-witted common-law wife of the older, sickly librarian Koichi (Ko Nishimura). Her life is dull drudgery, peppered with abuse from her in-laws. One day, while home alone, Sadako is sexually assaulted by a burglar (Shigeru Tsuyuguchi), which ends having unforeseeable implications for everyone. Also featuring Yuko Kusunoki and Ranko Akagi. This is unpleasant material, and even darker than Imamura and Harakawa's previous coolaboration The Insect Woman. However, there is a real artistry and beauty to the B&W cinematography, and the story is an unusual character study. Imamura's next film would be 1966's The Pornographers, which is much more humorous, if also dark in its subject matter.

Source: The Criterion Channel

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

And yes, that means that I've spent the last 8 and a half hours of my movie time watching versions of Hamlet. Truly a test for the ages.

Only one thing will assuage my exhausted psyche - Hercules!

You might decompress by watching: Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead (1990). 

Ian Richardson's Polonius does not have the verve of Hume Cronyn's portrayal but it is adequate considering its abbreviated nature.

Link to post
Share on other sites

King & Country (1964)  -  7/10

King-and-Country-inside.jpg

British WWI drama from director Joseph Losey. An army officer (Dirk Bogarde) is assigned to defend a soldier (Tom Courtenay) accused of desertion on the battlefront. The officer resents the assignment, yet begins to sympathize with the simple yet seemingly doomed man he's defending. Also featuring Leo McKern, Barry Foster, Peter Copley, James Villiers, Jeremy Spenser, Keith Buckley, Larry Taylor, and Barry Justice. There's excellent B&W cinematography, and the settings, reportedly all done on sound stages, are very realistic, filthy, muddy and repugnant. The performances from Bogarde and Courtenay are moving, nuanced, and award-worthy. This film isn't very long, just a hair under 90 minutes, but I could have used less time spent with the other random troops chasing rats and tormenting them.

Source: TCM

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

King & Country (1964)  -  7/10

Looks good.

Your reviews come so fast and furious, I get dizzy. Not sure whether that is good or bad.

:D

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Basket Case (1982)

This film left me thoroughly traumatized when I saw it as a young child. Every once in a while it still comes back on me in my dreams, every time it thinks I've forgotten about it, (yeah, I bet you think I'm kidding!)

(I saw Frankenhooker at a young age, too, actually. Ah yes- childhood nostalgia. *sigh*)

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Kay said:

This film left me thoroughly traumatized when I saw it as a young child. Every once in a while it still comes back on me in my dreams, every time it thinks I've forgotten about it, (yeah, I bet you think I'm kidding!)

(I saw Frankenhooker at a young age, too, actually. Ah yes- childhood nostalgia. *sigh*)

FRANKENHOOKER would make an excellent double bill with RE-ANIMATOR (1985)

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

A lot of what got released here as Hercules movies were actually Maciste in Italy, or Ursus, Samson, Achilles, Ulysses, Goliath, Thor, Vulcan, etc. And then there's the Son of Hercules, and on and on.

true dat. I wasn't really paying attention to notice, some of the films though, were quite good. 😎

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep.  In the early to mid '60's STEVE REEVES(no relation to George) was the AHH-NALD of his day!  Those HERCULES movies, despite being shamelessly cheezy, were a BIG hit here in the States.

Sepiatone

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...