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Lord Jim (1965)  -  6/10

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Adventure epic based on the Joseph Conrad novel, from screenwriter-director Richard Brooks. Jim (Peter O'Toole) is a British sailor in 19th century southeast Asia. After he's accused of cowardice and ostracized by "civilized" society, he sets out to redeem himself and reclaim his honor. Also featuring Jack Hawkins, Paul Lukas, Daliah Lavi, Eli Wallach, James Mason, Curt Jurgens, Akim Tamiroff, Andrew Keir, Walter Gotell, Juzo Itami, Marne Maitland, Christian Marquand, John Richardson, and Jack MacGowran. This was reportedly a very difficult location shoot, although one of the film's highlights are the scenes at Angkor Wat. Some of the action sequences are well-handled; others go on too long. The performances are okay. I liked Paul Lukas more than usual, and James Mason is fun as a bearded, bowler-sporting baddie. I'm a fan of Peter O'Toole, and he's the chief reason I watched this, but I wouldn't rank this among his better performances. He has some strong moments, but in many others he seems mannered and phony. 

Source: internet

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Whistle Stop (1946) George Raft, Ava Gardner, Tom Conway. Overheated, half-baked, semi-campy

but enjoyable crime flick. Ava, Georgie's old flame, has just returned to their small hometown of

Ashbury from two years in Chicago. George is not happy to see her wearing a mink coat and

other costly trinkets given to her by her "gentlemen admirers" in Chi town. Raft plays what must

be one of the laziest characters in the movies. He lives with poor old mom and pa who give him

a few bills so he can go out at night and play poker and drink. During the day he sits around not

doing much of anything. Tom Conway is the well off owner of a nightclub and Ava pings pongs

back and forth between him and lazybones Raft. An employee comes up with a plan to rob Conway

with Raft as his partner in crime. This doesn't work out too well, but Conway is killed and this

leaves the door open for Georgie. At the finale he and Ava make up and hand in hand walk off

into the sunset and into a future that looks mighty ambiguous. If anyone is going to earn the

couple's daily bread, it likely won't be Raft. The paint by the numbers crime plot is aided by the

small town setting and the unintentionally humorous mega shiftless character played by Raft.

Ava looks very good in this early role and Tom Conway makes a good rival for George. George Raft

has grown on me, sort of like a benign fungus, and whatever his limitations as an actor, I enjoy

seeing him in a movie.

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Marriage on the Rocks  (1965)  -  5/10

b70-4516

Half domestic marital comedy, half swingin' 60's sex comedy. Long-married couple Dan (Frank Sinatra) and Valerie (Deborah Kerr) have hit a rough patch, so they set out for a second honeymoon to try and patch things up, only to end up divorced by mistake. Meanwhile, Dan's co-worker Ernie (Dean Martin) makes time with everything in a skirt. Also featuring Nancy Sinatra, Tony Bill, Cesar Romero, Hermione Baddeley, John McGiver, Kathleen Freeman, Joi Lansing, Davey Davison, Michel Petit, DeForest Kelley, Parley Baer, Byron Foulger, Frank Gerstle, and Trini Lopez as himself. Only about a third of the jokes land, Frank sleepwalks through the film, Dean seems to have gotten tired of his own shtick, and Kerr overdoes it. Baddeley (as a drunken in-law) and Romero (as a desperate Mexican divorce attorney) are funny but play it very broad.

Source: TCM

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20 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Le Bonheur (1965)  -  7/10

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French drama from writer-director Agnes Varda. Francois (Jean-Claude Drouot) is a married woodworker. His wife (Marcelle Faure-Bertin) looks after their young children, and they are very happy. However, Francois begins an affair with Emilie (Marie-France Boyer), but rather than leave his wife and children, he hopes they'll accept his new relationship while also continuing on with the old. Varda's take on the importance of traditional relationships is ambiguous, leaving it up to the viewer to decide if an open marriage is appropriate, at least as far as the men are concerned. She could be condemning such thinking, as well. The film could be trying say that men will do anything, even destroying those they profess to love, in order to secure their own happiness. The color cinematography and the Mozart score are good, though.

Source: The Criterion Channel

I think that this gorgeous-looking film was about Agnes Varda's relationship with her bisexual husband, Jacques Demy.

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Marriage on the Rocks  (1965)  -  5/10

On TCM again Friday, June 21 at 6:00 PM.

The only redeeming quality is Dean Martin's apartment:

marriageontherocks.jpg

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Simon of the Desert (1965)  -  8/10

simon-of-the-desert-review.jpg

Allegorical Mexican short film from writer-director Luis Bunuel. Simon (Claudio Brook) is a Christ-like figure who spends his days and nights standing on top of a pillar in the desert outside a Mexican town. He speaks to various pilgrims and passersby who pray for him, expect him to perform miracles (which he occasionally does), or to torment him. This last activity is favored by Satan (Sylvia Pinal), who appears in various guises. Like much of Bunuel's work, this is intensely critical of the Catholic Church, and organized religion in general. It's darkly comical, absurdist, and offensive to many sensibilities. I thought it was hilariously weird and entertaining. Recommended.

Source: Criterion DVD. Also included is a feature-length documentary about Bunuel's Mexican period of films that's essential to fans of his work.

simon.jpg

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28 minutes ago, Fedya said:

On TCM again Friday, June 21 at 6:00 PM.

The only redeeming quality is Dean Martin's apartment:

marriageontherocks.jpg

That light over the circular sofa looks like a spaceship. Thanks for posting this picture. It's great.

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5 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Whistle Stop (1946) George Raft, Ava Gardner, Tom Conway. Overheated, half-baked, semi-campy

but enjoyable crime flick. Ava, Georgie's old flame, has just returned to their small hometown of

Ashbury from two years in Chicago. George is not happy to see her wearing a mink coat and

other costly trinkets given to her by her "gentlemen admirers" in Chi town. Raft plays what must

be one of the laziest characters in the movies. He lives with poor old mom and pa who give him

a few bills so he can go out at night and play poker and drink. During the day he sits around not

doing much of anything. Tom Conway is the well off owner of a nightclub and Ava pings pongs

back and forth between him and lazybones Raft. An employee comes up with a plan to rob Conway

with Raft as his partner in crime. This doesn't work out too well, but Conway is killed and this

leaves the door open for Georgie. At the finale he and Ava make up and hand in hand walk off

into the sunset and into a future that looks mighty ambiguous. If anyone is going to earn the

couple's daily bread, it likely won't be Raft. The paint by the numbers crime plot is aided by the

small town setting and the unintentionally humorous mega shiftless character played by Raft.

Ava looks very good in this early role and Tom Conway makes a good rival for George. George Raft

has grown on me, sort of like a benign fungus, and whatever his limitations as an actor, I enjoy

seeing him in a movie.

I got this movie in a public domain DVD collection.

It just occurred to me that George Raft was awfully old to be playing somebody's Sonny Boy, as his mom treats him like he just graduated from high school.

Still the movie is entertaining in a way. And I thought it was interesting that Victor McLaglen gave us some cheap imitation of "The Informer" near the end of the movie. That may have been the best thing in this movie.

But I still think it's entertaining, if for nothing else to look at the beauty of Ava and the gorgeous presence of Tom Conway.

Besides, when all was said and done I think I paid $0.50 for each DVD -- it was the Femme Fatale collection:

I also got "Blonde Ice", "The Strange Love of Martha Ivers", and the phenomenal "Too Late for Tears" and probably three more.

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A Study in Terror (1965)  -  6/10

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Sherlock Holmes (John Neville) and Dr. Watson (Donald Houston) are after Jack the Ripper. Also with Anthony Quayle, Judi Dench and Frank Finlay. This was pretty lurid for the time, with a lot of blood and lasciviousness. It's also frequently dumb and contrived. Neville makes for a decent Holmes.

Source: Mill Creek Blu-ray

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12 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

b70-4516

Thanks for posting that poster. You can't imagine how many of those "adult entertainment" stickers I've had to remove over the years for collectors. I believe they were commonly used in Canada, don't know the reason.

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Obviously the Canadians felt it wasn't suitable for viewing by anyone under 21 (or whatever the "legal" age was at the time). 

That "legal age" term always tickled me.  Like implying anyone UNDER it was somehow "ILLegal"!  :D  :o 

Nowadays, being an "illegal" ANYthing means you run the risk of being deported.  ;)

Sepiatone

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58 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

I believe they were commonly used in Canada, don't know the reason.

[Resists urge to make jokes about Canadians]

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Satan Met a Lady (1936) - I watched this because it's one of the first "takes" on The Maltese Falcon.  In its own way, it's very entertaining, with Warren William as the wolfish and witty detective, Bette Davis as the femme fatale, and Alison Skipworth as Sidney Greenstreet (!), and Arthur Treacher as Peter Lorre.  Ok, it sounds implausible, but played strictly for laughs most of the time.  More of a whodunit with an unmarried and lower brow Nick Charles than anything that's faithful to Hammett's original intentions, but worth 77 minutes viewing.

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2 hours ago, rosebette said:

Satan Met a Lady (1936) - I watched this because it's one of the first "takes" on The Maltese Falcon.  In its own way, it's very entertaining, with Warren William as the wolfish and witty detective, Bette Davis as the femme fatale, and Alison Skipworth as Sidney Greenstreet (!), and Arthur Treacher as Peter Lorre.  Ok, it sounds implausible, but played strictly for laughs most of the time.  More of a whodunit with an unmarried and lower brow Nick Charles than anything that's faithful to Hammett's original intentions, but worth 77 minutes viewing.

If I remember right, Satan Met A Lady is the only film version of The Maltese Falcon (book) that shows/covers the burning of the cargo ship that the falcon arrived on. 

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Darkest Hour (2017).

Gary Oldman gives an excellent performance as Winston Churchill during the weeks in May 1940 from Neville Chamberlain's resignation and Churchill's becoming Prime Minister through to the Dunkirk evacuation.  Churchill may be remembered heroically now for his part in World War II, but in 1940 there was a substantial amount of opposition to him among the political class for his previous failures which were legion.

Unfortunately, the movie is marred by extremely intrusive direction, washed-out lighting, and an overbearing musical score.

6.5/10

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Zatoichi's Revenge (1965)  -  7/10

zatoichi10.jpg

Tenth entry in the long-running Japanese film series. Zaotichi (Shintaro Katsu), the blind masseur and master swordsman, investigates the murder of his former teacher, which leads to governmental corruption and yakuza double-dealing. More sword-fighting action, with a generous side helping of humor. I enjoying the performance of Norhei Miki as Denroku the Weasel, a crooked dice thrower who becomes an unlikely ally to Zatoichi.

Source: Criterion Blu-ray

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Man Is Not a Bird (1965)  -  7/10

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Feature debut of Yugoslavian filmmaker Dusan Makavejev. Engineer Jan (Janez Vrhovec) is sent to a small town to supervise some renovations at a heavy-industry plant. He begins an affair with the much younger Rajka (Milena Dravic), the daughter of his temporary landlords. While he wants to make things permanent, she may have other plans. Meanwhile, laborer Barbulovic (Stole Arandelovic) has problems at home and at work. There's a lot of visual pizzazz that keeps things interesting, even if I wasn't really sure of the point of the whole thing.

Source: The Criterion Channel

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Marco the Magnificent (1965)  -  6/10

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French/Italian historical epic, with Horst Buchholz as Marco Polo, the Venetian explorer who travels to the court of Emperor Kublai Khan (Anthony Quinn). Marco also has to deal with the shadowy criminal forces of the Old Man of the Mountain (Akim Tamiroff), a mysterious masked bandit leader. Also featuring Orson Welles, Omar Sharif, Robert Hossein, Gregoire Aslan, Massimo Girotti, Folco Lulli, and Elsa Martinelli as "The Woman with the Whip". Flashy costumes, location shooting (in Asia and Yugoslavia) and outlandish characters make this interesting if pretty darn silly. The first half of the film, dealing with Tamiroff as what amounts to a James Bond villain with a hidden lair, uniformed minions, and devilish weapons of torture (a guy is driven to madness inside a transparent giant bell), is both ludicrous and amusing. The latter part of the film, dealing with Anthony Quinn (who looks like Ming the Merciless) is a bit more pedestrian. 

Source: YouTube

marco.jpg

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19 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

I got this movie in a public domain DVD collection.

It just occurred to me that George Raft was awfully old to be playing somebody's Sonny Boy, as his mom treats him like he just graduated from high school.

Still the movie is entertaining in a way. And I thought it was interesting that Victor McLaglen gave us some cheap imitation of "The Informer" near the end of the movie. That may have been the best thing in this movie.

But I still think it's entertaining, if for nothing else to look at the beauty of Ava and the gorgeous presence of Tom Conway.

Besides, when all was said and done I think I paid $0.50 for each DVD -- it was the Femme Fatale collection:

I also got "Blonde Ice", "The Strange Love of Martha Ivers", and the phenomenal "Too Late for Tears" and probably three more.

Sort of the original slacker. Even when George was playing a shady character he worked

at something, even if it was sticking up banks. Here he just sits around the house all

day and parties all night. What is also funny is that his parents don't seem to mind that

much. I didn't mention McLaglen because the synopsis was already getting too long. He

brings a little bit extra to the stereotypical heavy role. Though there's nothing very

special about this movie I found it to be pretty entertaining. 

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Zatoichi and the Doomed Man (1965)  -  7/10

zatoichi-doomed-man-front-page-banner.jp

Eleventh entry in the long-running Japanese series. Zatoichi (Shintaro Katsu), the blind masseur and master swordsman, learns of a man wrongly condemned to die. Zatoichi heads to the village where the doomed man's alibi is supposed to be staying, but instead our hero gets wrapped up in a complicated conspiracy. This is as enjoyable as most of the series that I've seen, largely thanks to the good-humored charisma of Katsu in the lead role. There's an excellent action sequence set in a foggy fishing camp. My only compliant with the film would be the weak story resolution.

Source: Criterion Blu-ray

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