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23 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

A Double Life (1947). ***POSSIBLE SPOILERS AHEAD***

A Double Life was fantastic. 

GEORGE CUKOR was nominated for the OSCAR for his direction, but the film did not gett a BEST PICTURE nomination, which is a little odd...COLMAN was still present in a BEST PIC NOMINEE from that year tho- THE BISHOPS WIFE, where he costarred with BETS ACTRESS LORETTA YOUNG.

Seriously, HOW MANY FILMS center around KILLING SHELLEY WINTERS?

(Wishful thinking on the part of some?)

Also, there is footage of SHELLEY WINTERS and ROBERT OSBORNE on a talk show where she- in black leather- is confonted by He over her repeated claim she had been nominated for her part in A DOUBLE LIFE (she wasn't.)

I'm curious as to just how close to death Robert came when they called for a commercial break.

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33 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

GEORGE CUKOR was nominated for the OSCAR for his direction, but the film did not gett a BEST PICTURE nomination, which is a little odd...COLMAN was still present in a BEST PIC NOMINEE from that year tho- THE BISHOPS WIFE, where he costarred with BETS ACTRESS LORETTA YOUNG.

Sorry Lorna, but Ronald Colman was not in "The Bishop's Wife".  Cary Grant, David Niven, and Monty Woolley were the principle male leads.

"A Double Life" looks like an interesting picture (Signe Hasso was in it too).  However, it's a Republic release, so we'll probably never see it on TCM anytime soon.  "The Accused" is a 1949 release with Loretta Young, Bob Cummings, Wendell Corey, and Sam Jaffe.  It looks like it would be interesting on Noir Alley, as it's a psychological thriller, but it was released by Paramount, so we must wait....and wait....and wait.

 

EDIT---"The Accused" was last shown on TCM in October, 2002.  "A Double Life" aired last in July, 2017 and has been shown 17 times on TCM...(well, slap me down!).  See what happens when you hit 'ENTER' too soon!  "The Accused" has only been shown 5 times on this network, according to moviecollectoroh's database.

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9 minutes ago, midwestan said:

Sorry Lorna, but Ronald Colman was not in "The Bishop's Wife".  Cary Grant, David Niven, and Monty Woolley were the principle male leads.

"A Double Life" looks like an interesting picture (Signe Hasso was in it too).  However, it's a Republic release, so we'll probably never see it on TCM anytime soon.  "The Accused" is a 1949 release with Loretta Young, Bob Cummings, Wendell Corey, and Sam Jaffe.  It looks like it would be interesting on Noir Alley, as it's a psychological thriller, but it was released by Paramount, so we must wait....and wait....and wait.

 

EDIT---"The Accused" was last shown on TCM in October, 2002.  "A Double Life" aired last in July, 2017 and has been shown 17 times on TCM...(well, slap me down!).  See what happens when you hit 'ENTER' too soon!  "The Accused" has only been shown 5 times on this network, according to moviecollectoroh's database.

OH HOLY COW WHAT AN AMATEUR MISTAKE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Don't know what I was thinking!!!!!!

(and thanks)

I've seen THE ACCUSED (1949) online- it was a long time ago and while the attempted r a p e scene is STILL SHOCKING (especially since it features LORETTA YOUNG) I remember thinking it had some serious issues with the storytelling (almost becomes unintentionally funny at times.)

HOWEVER, this is all coming from someone who thought RONALD COLMAN was in THE BISHOP'S WIFE, so grain of salt and all!

i would definitely watch it again, and EDDIE MULLER gives it an interesting write up in DARK CITY.

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On 6/27/2019 at 12:54 PM, EricJ said:

I remember when it came out in '79, those of us who'd seen it said "No, really!  A Ron Miller-era 70's Disney comedy, and it's funny!"

...Nobody believed us.  😓

(But then, they didn't believe us that young Jodie Foster was funny in "Freaky Friday" or "Candleshoe", either.  So, don't worry, Nick & Nora, it won't be too painful by the time you get to it in the upper 70's echelons of your Disney quest.

Oh thank God. Thanks, Eric, for the reassurance. These 60s "comedies" are killing me softly. 

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33 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

OH HOLY COW WHAT AN AMATEUR MISTAKE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Don't know what I was thinking!!!!!!

(and thanks)

I've seen THE ACCUSED (1949) online- it was a long time ago and while the attempted r a p e scene is STILL SHOCKING (especially since it features LORETTA YOUNG) I remember thinking it had some serious issues with the storytelling (almost becomes unintentionally funny at times.)

HOWEVER, this is all coming from someone who thought RONALD COLMAN was in THE BISHOP'S WIFE, so grain of salt and all!

i would definitely watch it again, and EDDIE MULLER gives it an interesting write up in DARK CITY.

Loretta Young and Ronald Colman did win their Oscars in the same year.  So they do have that in common.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Seriously, HOW MANY FILMS center around KILLING SHELLEY WINTERS?

(Wishful thinking on the part of some?)

Maybe we should make a list of films where Shelley Winters survives to the end.

Despite giving it a valiant effort, I do not believe that John Garfield kills Winters in He Ran All the Way

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The Hero aka Nayak (1966)  -  8/10

nayak.png?w=547

Indian drama from writer-director Satyajit Ray. Famous movie star Arindam Mukherjee (Uttam Kumar) takes a train ride to Delhi in order to accept an award. On board he meets ambitious journalist Aditi (Sharmila Tagore) who gets him to agree to an interview, during which he reflects on the major incidents of his life. Meanwhile, various little domestic dramas play out among several of the other passengers. Ray's inside look at movie actor celebrity and artistic compromises is multi-layered and inventively shot. The performances are all very good, with Kumar truly outstanding as the deeply conflicted movie star. Ray also provided the film's score, which made me wonder: are there any other directors beside Satyajit Ray and John Carpenter who routinely provided their films' scores? Recommended.

Source: The Criterion  Channel

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5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

GOD is looking out for me, MYRA BRECKINRIDGE has NOT shown up in my HULU feed, it is probably for the best.

However, THE RITZ (1976) (which was part of the BIG GAY TRIBUTE last night) was.

I had never heard of it and I watched it.

It is a terribly uneven farce- an OBVIOUSLY adapted stage play- about a DEEPLY, DEEPLY STUPID straight man (JACK WESTON) who is hiding out from JERRY STILLER and the MAFIA, who want to kill him and/or frame him in some weird photo blackmail scheme- in a GAY BATH HOUSE IN NEW YORK CITY.

Forgive this analogy because I know the dates on this don't line up, but this movie is BASICALLY what would happen if QUENTIN CRISP grabbed TERRANCE MACNALLY, handed him a carton of joints and said "rework BOAT TRIP in two days so it's not THE WORST THING ever" and he was all "YOU'RE ON" and went and gave it his best damned shot and in the end basically succeeded...

....I'm just that one guy in the back row saying, "yes, Terry, but why?"

I'd be lying if I said I didn't laugh loud and often- the check-in scene is EXCELLENT- but I'd also be lying if I said I wasn't tempted to turn it off many times during the THIRD ACT IN NEED OF A REWRITE.

some of the bits get old and I think they should have asked themselves if this whole thing wasn't better suited to the stage

F MURRAY ABRAHAM is in this, and he is really charming. You'd never guess you're looking at a future BEST ACTOR WINNER, but the talent is there.

RITA MORENO is in this as the Bathhouse Betty (entertainer.) It is my understanding that RITA barely worked in the decade after WEST SIDE STORY because all she was offered were "JOO TAKE JOUR DAMN DERTY HANS HOFFA ME JOO  FEELTHY PEEG!!!"-type roles. Guess she needed to make a house payment or something, because honestly, that quote should have been her character's name....and you have to kind of love a performance where she throws a man down a laundry shoot for ruining her act and then dives in after him screaming "I KEEL YOU" when he shouts from the bottom of the chute that her drag act is bad. ..but still. It's not exactly that PUERTO RICAN LADY MACBETH part that RITA had been holding her breath for since 1964...and still is.

TREAT WILLIAMS is in this. It is supposed to be funny that his character has a high voice. I have read here and there that TREAT WILLIAMS is supposed to have been good in PRINCE OF THE CITY and other things I have not seen. I have never found him more than BARELY ADEQUATE in anything I have seen him in. He is cute tho.

aside from the fact that they were seemingly constructed of balsa wood and cardboard room dividers and decorated with heavy input from GRACE JONES, BATHHOUSES LOOK PRETTY **** AWESOME. I know I'd be in the theater checking out A STAR IS BORN.

The stage play was truly hiarious.

It was directed by Robert Drivas.

Richard Lester destroyed the play.

It looks like a foreign production..

 

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7 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Oh thank God. Thanks, Eric, for the reassurance. These 60s "comedies" are killing me softly. 

Hang in there through the 70's, "Tron"'s a-coming...Just the heartbreak-hill of "Return From Witch Mountain" and "Herbie Goes Bananas" to get through, and the "farewell" of "Midnight Madness", and then the 70's get easier.

(Even "The Cat From Outer Space" has its pleasant moments, "Treasure of Matecumbe" is an overlooked gem, and old-school Robert Stevenson could make "Island at the Top of the World" and "Bedknobs & Broomsticks" better-remembered than they deserved to be and "Herbie Rides Again" and "One of Our Dinosaurs is Missing" downright adorable.  😁  If you see Vincent McEveety's name on a comedy, however, which you'll see a lot in the 60's-70's, Be Very Afraid.)

4 hours ago, rayban said:

The stage play was truly hiarious.

It was directed by Robert Drivas.

Richard Lester destroyed the play.

Not to mention, Rita Moreno got a Tony for the stage role.

(And gee, thought "A look back at the pre-Stonewall era of NY bathhouses" would be treated more historically during the cultural appreciation of Pride Month...  😛  )

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For lack of a better term, I watched 3 of the 4 movies Friday in the "Stonewall Series"; Some Of My Best Friends Are..., The Ritz, and Torch Song Trilogy.  The first film was a TCM premiere.  The second one was shown for only the second time on TCM, and the last one was shown for just the 4th time on TCM.  Myra Breckenridge, the 4th film in the Stonewall observation, was also a premiere, but it was on too late for me to watch it, and I didn't have any way to record it.

The first film was set around Christmas time at a gay bar in New York City called, the Blue Jay.  "Some Of My Best Friends Are..." had a very large cast and the story bounced around from character to character or relationship to relationship exploring the dynamics of the characters or the relationships as it pertained to their personalities, attitudes, and realities associated as gay men in 1971 (when the film was made).  There are several people that were familiar to me, but I couldn't recall their names.  The four characters I did recognize were Rue McClanahan (a bar customer who likes to mock some of the clientele but realizes the bar is a safe haven for her since it's unlikely any patron will make advances to her), Fannie Flag (the coat-check lady that everybody loves), Gary Sandy (narcissistic stud who looked for some yum-yum on the side once he tired of his sugar daddy), and Gil Gerard (a pilot who comes off as straight, but loves being the 'rock' for his boyfriend).  It wasn't a bad film, and I'd probably want to see it again to see if I could make other observations that might have passed over me the first time around.  I'm not going to spoil anything here, but there is a fight scene toward the end of the picture, and the camera work with its quick movements in a tight space containing a lot of people is quite masterful.

The second film "The Ritz", was set in an NYC bath house.  It's a spoof about mistaken identities as Jerry Stiller sets out to try and kill his brother-in-law (Jack Weston) after Stiller's father passes away and he thinks the guy's dying wish is to see Weston bumped off.  Rita Moreno is the female lead, and she does a decent job as the entertainment for the guys in the bath house, although Weston thinks she's a man who's playing a transvestite.  A young Treat Williams is good eye candy spending most of the time in a skimpy towel around his waist.  However, while his character is grown-up, his voice is not.  Many of the funny dialog and action here fell flat with me, for the most part. After about 20 or 30 minutes, I was sort of rooting for Stiller to pull off the hit!  But, being the glutton for punishment that I can be on occasion, I stuck with it through its entirety.  Interesting that while Rita Moreno won a Tony Award for her portrayal when "The Ritz" played on Broadway, the actual movie itself was shot in London.  Strange, huh?

I had seen "Torch Song Trilogy" before when it aired on TCM, but I think Friday night was the first time I'd seen it all the way through.  The scenes between Harvey Fierstein and Anne Bancroft at the cemetery and his apartment toward the end of the movie were intense and emotional as all get-out, and in the end, touching.  Overall, it was an interesting picture that showed an array of gay or bi-sexual characters with more depth than "Some Of My Best Friends Are...".  Then again, "Torch Song Trilogy" had 17 years to experience and explore same-sex lifestyles, and you could see how attitudes had changed and improved between 1971 and 1988.  The supporting players here (Matthew Broderick and Brian Kerwin) were excellent as Arnold's (Harvey Fierstein's) significant others at various stages of his life.  This was the best of the 3 films I watched Friday, with "Some Of My..." ranking second, and "The Ritz" the least enjoyable of the three.

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"Some of My Best Friends Are .. " is a genuine time capsule - it is permeated with the negativism that was identified with homosexuality at that time - 1971.

Still, for its' ability to realize a "madhouse" atmosphere in just one night, it is mesmerizing.

You might have recognized a former MGM star - Carlton Carpenter - as Miss Untouchable.

"The Ritz" was a huge hit on Broadway.

It was directed by a former lover of Mr. McNally's, actor/director Robert Drivas.

When Richard Lester took over the direction for the film and moved it to London, he destroyed the magnificence of Mr. Drivas' direction.

It is - and will always be - one of the great stage farces.

"Torch Song Trilogy" is a superb film translation of a classic gay play.

It is well-directed and well-acted.

Today, it seems more relevant than ever.

Yes, Harvey Fierstein rules

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Las Vegas Hillbillys (1966)  -  4/10

220px-The_Las_Vegas_Hillbillys.jpg

Country musical comedy with Ferlin Husky as a poor backwoods feller who inherits a rundown casino in Las Vegas. He works with bargirl Boots Malone (Mamie Van Doren) and his old Aunt Clem (Billie Bird) to get the place up and running again. Also featuring Jayne Mansfield as a glamorous celebrity, Don Bowman, Louis Quinn, Arlene Charles, Robert V. Barron, and Richard Kiel. With musical performances by Sonny James, Roy Drusky, Del Reeves, Bill Anderson, Connie Smith, Wilma Burgess, the Duke of Paducah, the Junior Carolina Cloggers, and the Jordanaires. Silly, cheap fluff offering the rare sight of Jayne and Mamie in the same movie, and they both "sing", too. Add Richard "Jaws" Kiel to the cast, and this is a must-see for B-movie aficionados, although I can't say that it's a must-see-again.

Source: internet 

tumblr_pkkb2z29rH1xwvex7o1_400.jpg

tumblr_mcfpgtqAVx1rjsdduo3_250.gif

 

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4 hours ago, rayban said:

The stage play [THE RITZ] was truly hiarious.

It was directed by Robert Drivas.

Richard Lester destroyed the play.

It looks like a foreign production..

 

it does. especially the opulent multi-level hotel lobby.

EDIT- JUGGERNAUT (1974)- which was directed by RICHARD LESTER is EXCELLENT though! So I am always willing to cut him some slack on some of his other works, such as SUPERMAN III.

I mean, at least once he did a bang-up directing job.

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11 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I mean, at least once he did a bang-up directing job.

Somebody needs to watch It's Trad, Dad! and A Hard Day's Night.

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11 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I have never seen A HARD DAYS NIGHT.

(I know, I know)

 Just spend about 30 minutes with me and you don't have to watch it.

 I can recite the entire dialogue for you from memory.

BTW-- if you're not a Beatles fan, I won't sing the songs.

 

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5 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

 Just spend about 30 minutes with me and you don't have to watch it.

 I can recite the entire dialogue for you from memory.

BTW-- if you're not a Beatles fan, I won't sing the songs.

 

this is terrible, i was born in 1978, and i never disliked, but i never really listened to THE BEATLES. But I knew (and liked) the cover THE SUPREMES did of A HARD DAY'S NIGHT really, really well for years before i heard the Beatles version.

cringe if you want, i like it.

 

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Le deuxieme souffle (1966)  -  7/10

A1qEAzwPRoL._SY445_.jpg

Epic French crime drama from director Jean-Pierre Melville. Gu (Lino Ventura) is an aging career criminal who has just escaped from prison. He agrees to one last job, a daring armored car heist, in order to fund his escape to safer shores. Things don't go as planned. Also featuring Paul Meurisse, Raymond Pellegrin, Marcel Bozzuffi, Denis Manuel, Michel Constantin, Pierre Grasset, Pierre Zimmer, and Christine Fabrega. I had really been looking forward to this one, as I'm a fan of the director, the star and the genre. Unfortunately I ended up being disappointed in it, as the two-and-a-half-hour runtime seemed bloated and unnecessary, and the story was overly familiar. I still thought it was good, just not extraordinarily so as many seem to think.

Source: TCM

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Lost Command (1966)  -  6/10

51386D4WEFL._SY445_.jpg

War action/drama from director Mark Robson. French army colonel Pierre Raspeguy (Anthony Quinn) is defeated by the Vietnamese at Dien Bien Phu. After the armistice is signed, he and his troops are sent back to their homes far away. One of the troops is an Arab named Mahidi (George Segal!), and when he gets back home to Algeria, he joins the revolution against the French colonial powers, eventually becoming a notorious leader of the uprising. Raspeguy is sent to quash the rebellion. Also featuring Alain Delon as a conscience-stricken soldier, Claudia Cardinale as Mahidi's sister, Michele Morgan, Maurice Ronet, Gregoire Aslan, Jean Servais, Jacques Marin, and Burt Kwouk. If the casting of Segal and Cardinale as Algerian Arabs didn't clue you in, this is a very Hollywood look at this historical conflict. Some of this works as an action flick, some of it as a melodrama, but as a whole it's lacking, with a facile presentation of the complicated real-world bloodshed.

Source: internet

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8 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

 Just spend about 30 minutes with me and you don't have to watch it.

 I can recite the entire dialogue for you from memory.

BTW-- if you're not a Beatles fan, I won't sing the songs.

That's okay, you do the dialogue, I'll do the screaming:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6RRwSI5I9EU

(Even that "....George! 😥 " bit at the end.)

8 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

But I knew (and liked) the cover THE SUPREMES did of A HARD DAY'S NIGHT really, really well for years before i heard the Beatles version.

cringe if you want, i like it.

Hearing that iconic "twannng!" become a Motown-guitar "...plunk!"?  

I think that says it all.

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17 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

are there any other directors beside Satyajit Ray and John Carpenter who routinely provided their films' scores?

Chaplin?

nayak.png?w=547

This picture scared me - Sharmila Tagore looks just like me in that picture! 

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