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Just watched THE UNTOUCHABLES for the umpteenth time yesterday. I just cannot resist seeing the train station scene again. Ness-" You got him?" Stone- "Yea, I got him" Ness- "Take him!"

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On 6/28/2019 at 11:53 AM, speedracer5 said:

A Double Life (1947). ***POSSIBLE SPOILERS AHEAD***

As part of my Edmond O'Brien kick, I borrowed A Double Life from the library.  O'Brien isn't in the first part of the film much at all.  I was beginning to wonder if he was going to do more than say a couple lines here and there.  His character is mentioned often and fuels the jealousy in Ronald Colman's character.  O'Brien however plays a pivotal role in the last part of the film.

A Double Life was fantastic.  In this film, Colman stars as an actor who is known for his extreme "method acting" to the point where his own personality is completely taken over by the personality of whatever character he's playing at the time.  When Colman is playing a comedic role in a play, he's completely charming and everyone loves him.  However, if he is playing a dramatic role, he gets so enmeshed in the part that he's a completely different person--usually an awful person, depending on the character.  His wife, Signe Hasso, actually divorces him because of this.  Despite loving him, she just couldn't handle his personality completely changing each time he appeared in a new dramatic role.

Colman is offered the title role in Shakespeare's Othello, which Colman is very hesitant to accept.  Hasso, who still loves Colman, is also unsure of him taking on this project.  At this point in the film, I had to research what Othello was about so I could understand everyone's hesitation. In a nutshell, Othello is about a man who becomes extremely jealous when he thinks his wife, Desdemona is having an affair (at least that's what I gathered). 

Anyway, as Colman hems and haws over the part, to the point of reciting Othello's soliloquies to himself and picturing himself as Othello, and decides to accept the part.  Prior to starting in the play, Colman means a young, buxom (as she's described later) waitress, Shelley Winters. He finds himself charmed with her and even spends time with her.  As far as I can tell though, he isn't in love with her, like he is with ex-wife Hasso.  I think Colman likes that this young woman is interested in him, and she likes that this older, distinguished gentleman is interested in her.  Anyway... 

Rehearsals are over and Colman and Hasso perform for the first time as Othello and Desdemona.  There's a scene toward the end of the play where Othello strangles Desdemona to death while kissing her passionately.  The play is a big hit.  We then are treated to a montage of standing ovations, performances, telegrams, etc. showing us that the play is now in its 200th performance.  As expected, Colman has completely lost himself in the part of Othello.

Soon, life imitates art as Colman completely loses himself while canoodling with Winters.  Seeing that it is Shelley Winters, her part in the film does not end well. 

Colman was in such a fugue state that he has no idea what has happened.  This is when O'Brien's character comes in and tries to figure out what really happened to Winters.  Underneath all of this story, there is the theme of jealousy, where Colman whose personality has been taken over by Othello, becomes jealous of O'Brien's relationship with Hasso.  It seems that O'Brien has feelings for her, she knows, and she is friendly with him.  As far as I can tell though, they aren't having any type of romantic relationship.

Anyway.  This was a great film, one that I'd definitely watch again.  Colman completely deserved the Oscar he won for this film.  I read that Cary Grant was offered this part, but he turned it down, concerned that he couldn't deliver Shakespearean dialogue. Grant in this part may have been interesting...

This was shown a while back, when TCM featured Ronald Colman as Star of the Month, so we don't see it too often.  Colman's reading of Othello in the final scenes is one of the most understated and beautifully tragic I've ever seen.  My dad, who was an English teacher, when asked who is favorite Othello was (back in the day when there weren't too many screen versions -- Welles and Olivier, as well as an occasional PBS broadcast by the Royal Shakespeare Company), always said Colman.     While Colman's character is a troubled character who ultimately commits murder, he retains the audience's compassion and sympathy throughout.  I remember reading somewhere that he wept when he learned he had won the Oscar.  One of my favorite underrated actors, who always brings me to tears in 3 films -- Lost Horizon, Random Harvest (yes, I know it's schmaltzy), and A Double Life.

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I had a great Saturday afternoon, reliving my rainy Saturdays when I was about 12, watching old flicks on TV.  I couldn't resist Gentleman Jim, although I had seen it many times before.  What a joy to watch Flynn and the Warners' stable of character actors chew the scenery in this one.  The scene between Flynn as Corbett and Ward Bond as John L. Sullivan is a real heart-warmer.  I'm not a fan of boxing films, but those scenes were really great; the camera moving around with the boxers reminded me of some of Ophuls' work in movies like La Ronde.  I kind of felt like was traveling around the ring with Jim Corbett's dancer like moves.  Since I hadn't had enough of Flynn, I rewatched The Adventures of Robin Hood, great fun and a great film, a real classic, of course, but in the last half hour Gentleman Jim, I could see how Flynn had grown as an actor over a few years.

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A Man Called Adam (1966)  -  6/10

220px-A_Man_Called_Adam_film_poster.jpg

Jazz music drama with Sammy Davis Jr. as Adam Johnson, a famous trumpeter and singer who is wracked with rage and a self-destructive streak. Nice-girl Cicely Tyson tries to set him straight, to mixed results. Also featuring Louis Armstrong, Ossie Davis, Michael Silva, Frank Sinatra Jr., Peter Lawford, Lola Folana, Ja'net DuBois, Johnny Brown, George Rhodes, Michael Lipton, Kenneth Tobey, and Mel Torme. Davis goes all in with his portrayal of the damaged musician. The story slowly reveals the many reasons, both legitimate and self-inflicted, that Adam is filled with such anger. The film's direction by Leo (father of Sean) Penn is a bit weak, with poor pacing and variable production values. This would mark his sole feature directing credit, although he had a busy career directing in television. Tyson's character is underwritten, with nebulous motivation, and many of the other cast members are wasted in nothing parts. Look closely at the background during the Mel Torme party scene to glimpse a 29-year-old Morgan Freeman making his second film appearance.

Source: internet

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32 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

A Man Called Adam (1966)  -  6/10

220px-A_Man_Called_Adam_film_poster.jpg

Jazz music drama with Sammy Davis Jr. as Adam Johnson, a famous trumpeter and singer who is wracked with rage and a self-destructive streak. Nice-girl Cicely Tyson tries to set him straight, to mixed results. Also featuring Louis Armstrong, Ossie Davis, Michael Silva, Frank Sinatra Jr., Peter Lawford, Lola Folana, Ja'net DuBois, Johnny Brown, George Rhodes, Michael Lipton, Kenneth Tobey, and Mel Torme. Davis goes all in with his portrayal of the damaged musician. The story slowly reveals the many reasons, both legitimate and self-inflicted, that Adam is filled with such anger. The film's direction by Leo (father of Sean) Penn is a bit weak, with poor pacing and variable production values. This would mark his sole feature directing credit, although he had a busy career directing in television. Tyson's character is underwritten, with nebulous motivation, and many of the other cast members are wasted in nothing parts. Look closely at the background during the Mel Torme party scene to glimpse a 29-year-old Morgan Freeman making his second film appearance.

Source: internet

Wasn't aware of this film,  but given the subject I'll have to check it out (weak direction and all),  so thanks for the info.

Reading up on it there appears to be some solid musical numbers with two of the songs written by the jazz musician \ musical producer for the film, Benny Carter.

 

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3 hours ago, rosebette said:

I had a great Saturday afternoon, reliving my rainy Saturdays when I was about 12, watching old flicks on TV.  I couldn't resist Gentleman Jim, although I had seen it many times before.  What a joy to watch Flynn and the Warners' stable of character actors chew the scenery in this one.  The scene between Flynn as Corbett and Ward Bond as John L. Sullivan is a real heart-warmer.  I'm not a fan of boxing films, but those scenes were really great; the camera moving around with the boxers reminded me of some of Ophuls' work in movies like La Ronde.  I kind of felt like was traveling around the ring with Jim Corbett's dancer like moves.  Since I hadn't had enough of Flynn, I rewatched The Adventures of Robin Hood, great fun and a great film, a real classic, of course, but in the last half hour Gentleman Jim, I could see how Flynn had grown as an actor over a few years.

Flynn, while always magnetic, certainly had grown as an actor since Captain Blood had made him a star seven years before Gentleman Jim. The entire cast, but, in particular, Flynn, Ward Bond and Alan Hale, seem energized in their roles. And not enough praise can be given to director Raoul Walsh, who's nostalgic enthusiasm for this turn-of-the-century historical subject matter  (he had met both Sullivan and Corbett as a kid and wanted to pay tribute to them) produced a high paced energy that helps to keep this good natured film full of blarney Irish humour consistently entertaining throughout.

Highlight of the film for me is the fight on the wharf on San Francisco Bay, with boxing dandy Corbett taking on an uncouth bruiser in a memorable brawl. Walsh cuts back and forth between the two participants in the ring and the excited crowd, including shots of one of Corbett's brothers throwing his own punches in the air. There will be numerous knockdowns and Flynn will eventually be knocked out of the ring into the bay. He will be hauled back by rope to the accompanying sounds of Alexis Smith, overjoyed at the sight of the egotistical boxer suddenly all wet, shouting, "Paging Mr. Corbett!" Flynn will respond with a spray of water exiting his mouth as he leaps back into the ring to triumphantly knock out his opponent.

jim.jpg?w=645

It's a joyous sequence of exhilarating energy courtesy Walsh, cameraman Sidney Hickox and editor Jack Killifer, and remains one of the great peaks in the careers of all involved. Flynn may be best remembered for his swashbucklers today but, as an actor, he was possibly never more effective than in this 1942 production, which, aside from showing off the actor's athleticism, also provided him with ample opportunity to demonstrate his natural flair for playing a scene with humour.

MV5BZjUwOTg1OTAtNmU1Ny00ODliLWE3NGYtNGFj

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The Man Who Had His Hair Cut Short (1966)  -  7/10

man-who-had-his-hair-cut-short.jpg

Belgian drama from writer-director Andre Delvaux, based on the novel by Johan Daisne. Govert Miereveld (Senne Rouffaer) is a high school teacher obsessed with graduating student and aspiring singer Fran (Beata Tyszkiewicz). His preoccupation with her drives him to find other work, only to run into her again. Or does he? What's real and what's imagined become blurred as Govert descends into madness. Or does he? This arthouse film won't be for many viewers, as the story is more concerned about the inner life of Govert than with any plot-driven action or circumstances. Despite the intimate nature of the storytelling, relying largely on narration by Rouffaer, there's a remote coldness to the proceedings. While I found it intriguing, not being certain where, if anywhere, things were heading, I can't say that this will go over to well with the average viewer.

Source: YouTube

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Mondo Topless (1966)  -  5/10

51oBTCkTFbL.jpg

Russ Meyer's one-hour, mostly color "documentary" featuring a handful (no pun intended) of topless dancers gyrating to bad rock music. Their narrated inner thoughts and concerns are heard on the soundtrack, as well as commentary from a really bombastic guy (John Furlong). The dancers include Pat Barrington, Babette Bardot, Darlene Grey, Diane Young, Sin Lenee, Darla Paris, and Trina Lamarr. There's also footage lifted from Meyer's Europe in the Raw, another mondo movie about strippers, and footage of Lorna Maitland from Meyer's earlier film Lorna. It's all very silly, but amusing as a time capsule of both looks and music, and there's some of footage of San Francisco at the time. 

Source: YouTube

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3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

A Man Called Adam (1966)  -  6/10

220px-A_Man_Called_Adam_film_poster.jpg

Jazz music drama with Sammy Davis Jr. as Adam Johnson, a famous trumpeter and singer who is wracked with rage and a self-destructive streak. Nice-girl Cicely Tyson tries to set him straight, to mixed results. Also featuring Louis Armstrong, Ossie Davis, Michael Silva, Frank Sinatra Jr., Peter Lawford, Lola Folana, Ja'net DuBois, Johnny Brown, George Rhodes, Michael Lipton, Kenneth Tobey, and Mel Torme. Davis goes all in with his portrayal of the damaged musician. The story slowly reveals the many reasons, both legitimate and self-inflicted, that Adam is filled with such anger. The film's direction by Leo (father of Sean) Penn is a bit weak, with poor pacing and variable production values. This would mark his sole feature directing credit, although he had a busy career directing in television. Tyson's character is underwritten, with nebulous motivation, and many of the other cast members are wasted in nothing parts. Look closely at the background during the Mel Torme party scene to glimpse a 29-year-old Morgan Freeman making his second film appearance.

Source: internet

This movie is an old favorite of mine joke wise. Not quite a Rat Pack movie but certainly one of the worst movies I've ever seen.

And that's hard for a Rat Packer like myself to say, Especially with two embarrassing performances by my favorite performer Sammy Davis jr. And the Regal Peter Lawford.

When Sammy Davis was crawling for Manny, I'm sure the audience was not crawling but running out of the theater. LOL

The only good thing I can say about this movie is that it gave a lot of talented people who deserved better a nice paycheck for this one.

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Nashville Rebel (1966)  -  5/10

220px-Nahville_Rebel_1965_poster.jpg

Country music drama with Waylon Jennings as Arlin Grove, an ex-soldier with dreams of becoming a country music star. He marries nice girl Molly (Mary Frann), but slick-n-sleazy manager Wesley (Gordon Oas-Heim) tries to split them up. Also featuring Cece Whitney as Wesley's seductress girlfriend, and Henny Youngman as himself. With musical performances by Tex Ritter, Loretta Lynn, Porter Wagoner, Sonny James, the Wilburn Brothers, and Cousin Jody. This is played straight and serious, without all the goofiness of the Ferlin Husky country music movies. There are two songs performed that name-check a bunch of dead country music stars. 

Source: internet

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Mondo Topless (1966)  -  5/10

51oBTCkTFbL.jpg

Russ Meyer's one-hour, mostly color "documentary" featuring a handful (no pun intended) of topless dancers gyrating to bad rock music. Their narrated inner thoughts and concerns are heard on the soundtrack, as well as commentary from a really bombastic guy (John Furlong). The dancers include Pat Barrington, Babette Bardot, Darlene Grey, Diane Young, Sin Lenee, Darla Paris, and Trina Lamarr. There's also footage lifted from Meyer's Europe in the Raw, another mondo movie about strippers, and footage of Lorna Maitland from Meyer's earlier film Lorna. It's all very silly, but amusing as a time capsule of both looks and music, and there's some of footage of San Francisco at the time. 

Source: YouTube

Now Dat I gotta see!!!!

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The Oscar (1966)  -  4/10

the_oscar.jpg_112820081109.jpg

Inside-Hollywood melodrama with Stephen Boyd as a loathsome jerk who rises from strip-club barker to famous movie star, hurting everyone he meets along the way. When his career starts to wane, a surprise Oscar nomination may be his ticket back to the big time. Featuring Elke Sommer, Eleanor Parker, Jill St. John, Tony Bennett, Milton Berle, Ernest Borgnine, Joseph Cotten, Jack Soo, Broderick Crawford, Walter Brennan, Peter Lawford, James Dunn, Edie Adams, and Ed Begley. Several other people appear as themselves, including Bob Hope, Edith Head, Hedda Hopper, Merle Oberon, and Frank Sinatra. A notorious turkey marred by terrible performances (Sommer and Parker try to outdo each other among the gals, while Tony Bennett wins worst male performance by a San Francisco mile) and horrible dialogue (by Harlan Ellison among others). Fans of bad soaps might dig it, though.

Source: internet

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I just watched... Bugsy Malone (1976).  This is one of the first movies I remember seeing in the theaters.  I've been hoping TCM would show this someday and even requested it a few times on the old "suggest a movie" page.  So I was overjoyed to discover that a local channel was showing this last Sunday.  It stars a young Scott Baio and Jodie Foster leading a cast of kids in this charming musical directed by Alan Parker with music by Paul Williams.  It's a story of rival gangs fighting for control of a city.  The cast is all children/tweens so they use splurge guns that shoot whipped cream, they drive pedal get away cars, and the kids lip-sync to adults singing the tunes.  Really enjoyable.  "You give a little love, and it all comes back to you..." 

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1 hour ago, Peebs said:

I just watched... Bugsy Malone (1976).  This is one of the first movies I remember seeing in the theaters.  I've been hoping TCM would show this someday and even requested it a few times on the old "suggest a movie" page.  So I was overjoyed to discover that a local channel was showing this last Sunday.  It stars a young Scott Baio and Jodie Foster leading a cast of kids in this charming musical directed by Alan Parker with music by Paul Williams.  It's a story of rival gangs fighting for control of a city.  The cast is all children/tweens so they use splurge guns that shoot whipped cream, they drive pedal get away cars, and the kids lip-sync to adults singing the tunes.  Really enjoyable.  "You give a little love, and it all comes back to you..." 

This movie must have been on TV yesterday?? I'm not kidding, but last night my family and I were at Old Chicago (Pizza and Taproom) in SE Portland and Bugsy Malone was playing on the TV! 

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Out of Sight (1966)  -  3/10

MV5BYjY4YmZmNjgtNTQ3Mi00YTRkLWEwMDItMWU0

Beach movie/spy spoof mash-up with Jonathan Daly as Homer, a super-spy's bumbling butler who takes on the nefarious Big Daddy (John Lawrence) who's been driven mad by rock'n'roll, and has vowed to stop the beach partying teens near his underground lair. Also featuring Karen Jensen, Robert Pine, Carolyne Barry, Wende Wagner, Maggie Thrett, Deanna Lund, and Norman Grabowski as "Huh!". With musical performances by Gary Lewis & The Playboys, The Knickerbockers, The Astronauts, Freddie & The Dreamers, The Turtles, and Dobie Gray. This really insipid, with painfully unfunny gags and terrible acting. The bands may interest some people, but they either play songs you've never heard of or bad covers of other people's songs. There are several custom hot rods on display that may interest some as well. I thought the movie was a near complete waste, though.

Source: YouTube

out-of-sight-1966-film-61336eb6-cdab-439

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On 6/29/2019 at 7:10 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

GOD is looking out for me, MYRA BRECKINRIDGE has NOT shown up in my HULU feed, it is probably for the best.

However, THE RITZ (1976) (which was part of the BIG GAY TRIBUTE last night) was.

I had never heard of it and I watched it.

It is a terribly uneven farce- an OBVIOUSLY adapted stage play- about a DEEPLY, DEEPLY STUPID straight man (JACK WESTON) who is hiding out from JERRY STILLER and the MAFIA, who want to kill him and/or frame him in some weird photo blackmail scheme- in a GAY BATH HOUSE IN NEW YORK CITY.

Forgive this analogy because I know the dates on this don't line up, but this movie is BASICALLY what would happen if QUENTIN CRISP grabbed TERRANCE MACNALLY, handed him a carton of joints and said "rework BOAT TRIP in two days so it's not THE WORST THING ever" and he was all "YOU'RE ON" and went and gave it his best damned shot and in the end basically succeeded...

....I'm just that one guy in the back row saying, "yes, Terry, but why?"

I'd be lying if I said I didn't laugh loud and often- the check-in scene is EXCELLENT- but I'd also be lying if I said I wasn't tempted to turn it off many times during the THIRD ACT IN NEED OF A REWRITE.

some of the bits get old and I think they should have asked themselves if this whole thing wasn't better suited to the stage

F MURRAY ABRAHAM is in this, and he is really charming. You'd never guess you're looking at a future BEST ACTOR WINNER, but the talent is there.

RITA MORENO is in this as the Bathhouse Betty (entertainer.) It is my understanding that RITA barely worked in the decade after WEST SIDE STORY because all she was offered were "JOO TAKE JOUR DAMN DERTY HANS HOFFA ME JOO  FEELTHY PEEG!!!"-type roles. Guess she needed to make a house payment or something, because honestly, that quote should have been her character's name....and you have to kind of love a performance where she throws a man down a laundry shoot for ruining her act and then dives in after him screaming "I KEEL YOU" when he shouts from the bottom of the chute that her drag act is bad. ..but still. It's not exactly that PUERTO RICAN LADY MACBETH part that RITA had been holding her breath for since 1964...and still is.

TREAT WILLIAMS is in this. It is supposed to be funny that his character has a high voice. I have read here and there that TREAT WILLIAMS is supposed to have been good in PRINCE OF THE CITY and other things I have not seen. I have never found him more than BARELY ADEQUATE in anything I have seen him in. He is cute tho.

aside from the fact that they were seemingly constructed of balsa wood and cardboard room dividers and decorated with heavy input from GRACE JONES, BATHHOUSES LOOK PRETTY **** AWESOME. I know I'd be in the theater checking out A STAR IS BORN.

Lorna, it's my understanding that the Googie Gomez character is something Rita Moreno used to do at parties. Terrence McNally liked it and wrote it into his play The Ritz, for which Rita won a Tony. Jess, she did! I had a friend who used to do Googie's "I hod a dream, a dream about choo, baybay" bit. About Treat Williams: come on now, which is more important, adequate acting or cute?

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4 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

This movie must have been on TV yesterday?? I'm not kidding, but last night my family and I were at Old Chicago (Pizza and Taproom) in SE Portland and Bugsy Malone was playing on the TV! 

After years in limbo, Bugsy's now joined the Paramount Orphans, and has been playing just about everywhere on streaming (Criterion, Amazon, PlutoTV).  The disk may not be far behind.  

I've thought of watching that recent Paul Williams documentary, to find out why he dropped out of music so early and we didn't get more Williams-songs musicals after the 70's--his style is so recognizable, you expect Kermit the Frog to join in with "So You Wanna Be a Boxer" or "Give It a Try"--but I'm afraid it might be too depressing.  

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7 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

This movie must have been on TV yesterday?? I'm not kidding, but last night my family and I were at Old Chicago (Pizza and Taproom) in SE Portland and Bugsy Malone was playing on the TV

It was on last Sunday for me in the Midwest but that is interesting!  It was complete luck that I discovered it on our local channel last week just as it started.  I've been hoping to see it for years but it just seemed to have disappeared.  Maybe now it's just a cheap movie that local channels can afford.  I'm not sure how all that works but I was happy to find it.  Those songs came flooding back and I found myself singing along.  It really is a charming movie.

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13 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Now Dat I gotta see!!!!

There's lots of movies out there if you're just interested in seeing bewbies. A really interesting movie about strippers that has an excellent story to go along with the performances is SWEET SKIN or STRIP TEASE made in 1963. I was given a copy by a friend who knew I love Nico, who stars in it (as well as enjoying a good strip performance). It takes place in Paris and is an excellent movie with some very unique performances in it.

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19 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

A Man Called Adam (1966)  -  6/10

220px-A_Man_Called_Adam_film_poster.jpg

This was shown on TCM some time ago, I think it was an interesting curio, sort of "spot the celebrity" kind of game to it. What I remember most was that it was part of the Guest Programmer series and was picked by Officer Byrd, the bailiff from the "Judge Judy" show!

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i woke up and didn't feel like flipping around, so i turned on CHANDLER (1978?)

**EDIT: NO, 1971, BUT IT SEEMS LIKE 1978.

this morning.

all you really need to know about this movie is that there is a scene, which looks like it was filmed in the wilderness of Calabasas- I mean, just golden dry grass and rolling hills and oaks and dry dirt roads- and the Detective and his lady are apprehended on the lam by the baddies in a "rainstorm"- and by "rainstorm"- I mean they play HEAVY foley sounds of a STRONG downpour on concrete over footage that was shot at about 1:00 pm on The Longest Day of the Year in June during a drought and water restrictions and someone had a 1/2" piece of plastic tubing with a sprayer through which they are producing a light trickle of water on the right side of the frame- the droplets of which only show up when catching the GLARING SUNLIGHT OVERHEAD.

Oh, And Leslie Caron's (very ratty) hair is slightly wet.

I mean, they're always pushing it when it rains in Southern California in the movies, but this scene really just takes the cake. AT NO TIME DID ANYONE STOP AND ASK "DOES IT REALLY NEED TO BE RAINING IN THIS SCENE? WHAT DOES IT ADD TO THE STORY? IS LESLIE WEARING A WHITE LINEN BLOUSE AND NO BRA? ARE WE FILMING AN ADAPTATION OF RAIN? THE RAINS CAME? SINGIN IN THE RAIN? NO? OK THEN, 86 THE RAIN....and by that, I mean take that gallon jug of water back to craft services..."

"APRES MOI, LE DELUGE...Eventually."

actors-leslie-caron-and-warren-oates-in-

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2 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

There's lots of movies out there if you're just interested in seeing bewbies. A really interesting movie about strippers that has an excellent story to go along with the performances is SWEET SKIN or STRIP TEASE made in 1963. I was given a copy by a friend who knew I love Nico, who stars in it (as well as enjoying a good strip performance). It takes place in Paris and is an excellent movie with some very unique performances in it.

I was exaggerating of course.....

I know where I can get it, thanks for the heads up. 😉

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56 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

i woke up and didn't feel like flipping around, so i turned on CHANDLER (1978?)

**EDIT: NO, 1971, BUT IT SEEMS LIKE 1978.

this morning.

all you really need to know about this movie is that there is a scene, which looks like it was filmed in the wilderness of Calabasas- I mean, just golden dry grass and rolling hills and oaks and dry dirt roads- and the Detective and his lady are apprehended on the lam by the baddies in a "rainstorm"- and by "rainstorm"- I mean they play HEAVY foley sounds of a STRONG downpour on concrete over footage that was shot at about 1:00 pm on The Longest Day of the Year in June during a drought and water restrictions and someone had a 1/2" piece of plastic tubing with a sprayer through which they are producing a light trickle of water on the right side of the frame- the droplets of which only show up when catching the GLARING SUNLIGHT OVERHEAD.

Oh, And Leslie Caron's (very ratty) hair is slightly wet.

I mean, they're always pushing it when it rains in Southern California in the movies, but this scene really just takes the cake. AT NO TIME DID ANYONE STOP AND ASK "DOES IT REALLY NEED TO BE RAINING IN THIS SCENE? WHAT DOES IT ADD TO THE STORY? IS LESLIE WEARING A WHITE LINEN BLOUSE AND NO BRA? ARE WE FILMING AN ADAPTATION OF RAIN? THE RAINS CAME? SINGIN IN THE RAIN? NO? OK THEN, 86 THE RAIN....and by that, I mean take that gallon jug of water back to craft services..."

"APRES MOI, LE DELUGE...Eventually."

actors-leslie-caron-and-warren-oates-in-

I've watched this once, don't remember the rain scene but remember the film really sucked, which was too bad because I like both stars.

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