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1 minute ago, cigarjoe said:

I've watched this once, don't remember the rain scene but remember the film really sucked, which was too bad because I like both stars.

Yes, both of those statements are valid.

It's a shame OATES and CARON couldn't have been together in a better film...

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I had a big movie day last night. First I watched Arrowsmith(1931) with Ronald Colman who I had never heard of before. I’m sad to say that I was not impressed with what I saw. It’s just boring. It’s very predictable and nothing very interesting happened until the end but that was not enough to save this movie. Saddest part though, John Ford directed it!!! This is the man who got me interested into classic films when I watched The Grapes of Wrath. I guess it proves that even the masters had their bad days. 4/10

I also watched Made For Each Other(1939). This movie had quite a pedigree with Carole Lombard and Jimmy Stewart and Charles Coburn. It’s a sweet little romantic melodrama with spots of comedy. The acting is the best part. Stewart is, of course, excellent. Lombard is so fun to watch and Coburn was also very good. It was a good film for the first hour but the last 30 minutes go off the rails vert quickly in my opinion. It’s really short so if you want to give it a shot I’d recommend it anyway. 6/10 

Finally I watched The Thief Of Bagdad(1924) On TCM last night. This was a great Palette cleanser. I had never seen this movie before and I had never seen a Douglas Fairbanks film either. It took me a minute getting over the fact that he was playing an Arab(it was the 20s) but he was so fun to watch. I haven’t seen that many silent movies and most of them require you to suspend your disbelief. I need to watch more because making a great story with out words is quite the art. It was such a fun movie. Great special effects for the time, interesting story and characters, and very well directed by Raoul Walsh. I give this a huge recommendation! 10/10.

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Outlaw Motorcycles (1966)  -  4/10

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Documentary short directed by B-movie actor Titus Moede. The film takes a look at biker gangs in the L.A. area. There's a lot of footage of bikers goofing around and riding their motorcycles around streets and on the beach. Keenan Wynn shows up for a few seconds to chat with some of them. There's also some dumb staged footage of a biker wedding, and biker "Mama's" getting "branded" with tattoos, which requires them to get topless. This 35-minute short be of interest only to hardcore biker fans. The copy I watched was a later video release with a really terrible rock song repeated over and over again dubbed on top of the old audio.

Source: YouTube

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The Poppy Is Also a Flower (1966)  -  6/10

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International co-production made in conjunction with the United Nations. The film attempts to illustrate the efforts of various law enforcement groups to break-up the international opium and heroin trade. An American FBI man (E.G. Marshall), an INTERPOL agent (Trevor Howard), a U.N. envoy (Omar Sharif), and an Iranian Army colonel (Yul Brynner) team-up to smash the drug rackets, from the producers to the distributors. The large cast also includes Gilbert Roland, Anthony Quayle, Stephen Boyd, Hugh Griffith, Harold "Oddjob" Sakata, Rita Hayworth, Senta Berger, Marcello Mastroianni, Angie Dickinson, Georges Geret, Jack Hawkins, Amedeo Nazzari, Barry Sullivan, Eli Wallach, Nadja Tiller, Jean-Claude Pascal, Howard Vernon, and Trini Lopez. The producers crammed the film full of name stars in hopes of attracting an audience to a film about a grim and serious subject, but they only succeeded in trivializing the movie into a "spot the star" exercise in celebrity gawkery. The direction by Terence Young isn't bad. The version I watched had French credits but the dialogue was in English.

Source: Amazon Prime video

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Outlaw Motorcycles (1966)  -  4/10

Documentary short directed by B-movie actor Titus Moede.

How exactly do you pronounce that?  ("Howdy, bub.")

1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

The Poppy Is Also a Flower (1966)  -  6/10

International co-production made in conjunction with the United Nations. The film attempts to illustrate the efforts of various law enforcement groups to break-up the international opium and heroin trade. An American FBI man (E.G. Marshall), an INTERPOL agent (Trevor Howard), a U.N. envoy (Omar Sharif), and an Iranian Army colonel (Yul Brynner) team-up to smash the drug rackets, from the producers to the distributors. The large cast also includes Gilbert Roland, Anthony Quayle, Stephen Boyd, Hugh Griffith, Harold "Oddjob" Sakata, Rita Hayworth, Senta Berger, Marcello Mastroianni, Angie Dickinson, Georges Geret, Jack Hawkins, Amedeo Nazzari, Barry Sullivan, Eli Wallach, Nadja Tiller, Jean-Claude Pascal, Howard Vernon, and Trini Lopez. The producers crammed the film full of name stars in hopes of attracting an audience to a film about a grim and serious subject, but they only succeeded in trivializing the movie into a "spot the star" exercise in celebrity gawkery. The direction by Terence Young isn't bad. 

It ISN'T bad, actually:  I remember IJW'ing this one when it popped up on the backwaters of Amazon Prime a while back, and having an actual James Bond-vet directer makes it a better 007-knockoff than some of the cheap intentional British and Italian 007 knockoffs we had at the time.

The 80-Days star cameo'ing was pretty much of a UN charity benefit (the stars were "hired" for a dollar each), but have to admit, Yul Brynner is cool in anything, and Marcello Mastroianni has a better five minutes here than he had in entire Fellini films.  😁

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Promise Her Anything (1966)  -  5/10

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Romantic comedy with Warren Beatty as an aspiring filmmaker in Greenwich Village who has to make mail-order nudie shorts for producer Keenan Wynn in order to barely pay his bills. Beatty gets mixed up with his new next door neighbor Leslie Caron and her toddler son. His awkward attempts at babysitting lead to unforeseen developments. Also featuring Robert Cummings as Caron's boss, a fussy child psychologist from whom she has to hide her baby. With Hermione Gingold, Lionel Stander, Asa Maynor, Cathleen Nesbitt, Margaret Nolan, Ferdy Mayne, Bessie Love, and Donald Sutherland. A lot of badly-dated humor and cinematic techniques, the latter courtesy of director Arthur Hiller. This was the only Warren Beatty film that I hadn't seen. 

Source: TCM

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13 minutes ago, EricJ said:

How exactly do you pronounce that?  ("Howdy, bub.")

It ISN'T bad, actually:  I remember IJW'ing this one when it popped up on the backwaters of Amazon Prime a while back, and having an actual James Bond-vet directer makes it a better 007-knockoff than some of the cheap intentional British and Italian 007 knockoffs we had at the time.

The 80-Days star cameo'ing was pretty much of a UN charity benefit (the stars were "hired" for a dollar each), but have to admit, Yul Brynner is cool in anything, and Marcello Mastroianni has a better five minutes here than he had in entire Fellini films.  😁

1) It's pronounced Titus "Moody", which he was alternately credited as in a few things.

2) I have to agree that it's better than many of those European knock-offs. I was thinking watching the awful Out of Sight yesterday that there were more (usually terrible) spy spoofs than actual spy movies churned out in the decade. Brynner is cool, and he's actually why I watched the movie. I'm a fan of Mastroianni, even in those Fellini films, but his appearance in The Poppy Is Also a Flower is marred by some really terrible dubbing. The ending

with Marshall throttling Roland on the train tracks while Dickinson shouts at them was very silly looking.

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Just now, LawrenceA said:

Promise Her Anything (1966)  -  5/10

51Emda8aKxL.jpg

Romantic comedy with Warren Beatty as an aspiring filmmaker in Greenwich Village who has to make mail-order nudie shorts for producer Keenan Wynn in order to barely pay his bills. Beatty gets mixed up with his new next door neighbor Leslie Caron and her toddler son. His awkward attempts at babysitting lead to unforeseen developments. Also featuring Robert Cummings as Caron's boss, a fussy child psychologist from whom she has to hide her baby. With Hermione Gingold, Lionel Stander, Asa Maynor, Cathleen Nesbitt, Margaret Nolan, Ferdy Mayne, Bessie Love, and Donald Sutherland. A lot of badly-dated humor and cinematic techniques, the latter courtesy of director Arthur Hiller. This was the only Warren Beatty film that I hadn't seen. 

Source: TCM

I tried to catch this earlier and it hadn't and won't pop up on Watch TCM so I watched House of Wax instead. I was mildly curious about this one because of Beatty and Caron and also because I saw a tiny snippit of it during its last airing in 2012 or 2013. One thing can be said though, the title song sung by Tom Jones is certainly boisterous. Little trivia note: Despite being set in New York, all of this movie was filmed in London.

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34 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

1) It's pronounced Titus "Moody", which he was alternately credited as in a few things.

I assumed, since he'd be named after the old-radio farmer who lived on (Fred) Allen's Alley.

(Sorry, just drives me up the wall when "edgy" stars name themselves after cute pop-culture references--Just like director Spike Jonze naming himself after cowbell-ringing 40's bandleaders, or late rapper Nipsey Hussle trying to invoke 70's Match Game stars.)

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45 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

I tried to catch this earlier and it hadn't and won't pop up on Watch TCM so I watched House of Wax instead.

If I had a heart, you would be a man after it.

I’ve actually watched HOUSE OF WAX Three times this week on TCM on Hulu, last night I fell asleep to it and woke up in the middle of a dream that a horribly burned and disfigured Vincent Price was about to give me a Brazilian wax.

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32 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

If I had a heart, you would be a man after it.

I’ve actually watched HOUSE OF WAX Three times this week on TCM on Hulu, last night I fell asleep to it and woke up in the middle of a dream that a horribly burned and disfigured Vincent Price was about to give me a Brazilian wax.

i did get on the computer to try to watch it on Watch TCM West, but it said that the film was not available. I guess that's something to keep in mind, if a Paramount film (or Fox or Columbia or UA) is showing, it might be best to watch it live just so you know you can get to see it.

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A Report on the Party and the Guests (1966)  -  7/10

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Czech satirical drama from director Jan Nemec. A group of adult friends go on a picnic in an idyllic forest, only to be confronted by a bunch of vaguely authoritarian types who insist that they follow a set of arbitrary rules. Some of the picnickers comply, while others resist. They are all invited to a large outdoor birthday party, where even more rules are meant to be followed. As you may have guessed, this is all a very thinly-veiled attack on totalitarian regimes, and as such the film was banned outright in its home country. It's amusing, and reminded me a bit of Bunuel's films, although it's not nearly as outrageous. I kept expecting violence to erupt, but I've seen too many horror films.

Source: The Criterion Channel

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8 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

I've watched this once, don't remember the rain scene but remember the film really sucked, which was too bad because I like both stars.

Yes, the stars are fine, but the film is badly directed.

Leslie Caron and her then-husband sued MGM over its' handling of the picture.

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23 minutes ago, rayban said:

Yes, the stars are fine, but the film (CHANDLER) is badly directed.

Leslie Caron and her then-husband sued MGM over its' handling of the picture.

Yes, they and the director alleged that an MGM executive took it and butchered it and re-shot scenes and WRECKED it.

HOWEVER....

I have to kind of assume that some of the directors original scenes and visions ended up in the final product, because I find it hard to believe they re-shot the entire movie, and obviously it was a HOT MESS to start with...(In the majority of the scenes, the actors act as if they’re just running lines and trying to hit their marks, there’s not one scene of the movie that plays like it was *actually* intended to be in the final cut...

Like,  maybe the camera was rolling and the director just didn’t tell the actors because  he thought for some reason that it would lead to a more organic film or something?

(If anything, it’s entirely possible the original version was even worse before the studio “meddled” with it)

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A Smell of Honey, a Swallow of Brine (1966)  -  6/10

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Vintage exploitation sleaze from writer-producer David F. Friedman and director Byron Mabe. Stacey Walker stars as Sharon, a beautiful blonde office worker who likes to sexually torment those around her, whether getting heavy with a guy in a car and then accusing him of assault, or teasing her lesbian roommate. When Sharon tries her tricks with new guy at the office Lowell (Sam Melville, billed as "Neville Coward"), things get complicated. This is Walker's show all the way, and she turns in a better performance than most of the people in these kinds of "adults-only" features. This runs just over an hour.

Source: Something Weird DVD. There are two other features included (which I'll get to later), as well as trailers for such "classics" as The Lustful Turk and The Notorious Daughter of Fanny Hill. There's also a short look at a NYC grindhouse theater.

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6 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

A Smell of Honey, a Swallow of Brine (1966)  -  6/10

14795-a-smell-of-honey-a-swallow-of-brin

Vintage exploitation sleaze from writer-producer David F. Friedman and director Byron Mabe. Stacey Walker stars as Sharon, a beautiful blonde office worker who likes to sexually torment those around her, whether getting heavy with a guy in a car and then accusing him of assault, or teasing her lesbian roommate. When Sharon tries her tricks with new guy at the office Lowell (Sam Melville, billed as "Neville Coward"), things get complicated. This is Walker's show all the way, and she turns in a better performance than most of the people in these kinds of "adults-only" features. This runs just over an hour.

Source: Something Weird DVD. There are two other features included (which I'll get to later), as well as trailers for such "classics" as The Lustful Turk and The Notorious Daughter of Fanny Hill. There's also a short look at a NYC grindhouse theater.

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I gave it about a 5/10. My review and screencaps at Noirsville.

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The Taking of Power by Louis XIV (1966)  -  4/10

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Originally made for French television and directed by Roberto Rossellini, this film charts the ascension to power of the 17th century King Louis XIV (Jean-Marie Patte) after the death of Cardinal Mazarin (Cesar Silvagni). Louis oversees the construction of the palace at Versailles and encourages pomp and circumstance in an effort to beguile the rival nobles into a distracted peace. Rossellini uses the non-professional Patte as his lead, and it's one of the worst decisions in film history. Patte is incredibly awful, and could not memorize dialogue, so he very noticeably reads his lines off of cue cards throughout the movie, resulting in one of the most laughably bad acting performances that I've ever seen in a supposedly prestigious film. The material itself I found dull and uninteresting in the extreme. I would have to rank this among my very least favorite of the movies released by Criterion.

Source: The Criterion Channel

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6 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

I tried to catch this earlier and it hadn't and won't pop up on Watch TCM so I watched House of Wax instead. I was mildly curious about this one because of Beatty and Caron and also because I saw a tiny snippit of it during its last airing in 2012 or 2013. One thing can be said though, the title song sung by Tom Jones is certainly boisterous. Little trivia note: Despite being set in New York, all of this movie was filmed in London.

Promise Her Anything is as bad as Lawrence indicates. Although Leslie Caron was a bigger star than Warren Beatty when this movie was made, she agreed to give him top billing. The way that man had with women! I believe Caron left her husband, Peter Hall, for him. That marriage was in trouble, however; Hall was very jealous when his wife won the BAFTA for The L-Shaped Room. Inside joke in Promise Her Anything (and this will indicate the level of humor): Caron's little son is named John Thomas, which is British slang for the male organ.

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Thirst for Love (1966)  -  7/10

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Japanese drama based on a book by Yukio Mishima, and directed by Koreyoshi Kurahara. Etsuko (Ruriko Asaoka) is a young widow who continues to live with her wealthy in-laws, helping take care of the irascible family patriarch (Nobuo Nakamura). Etsuko grows increasingly lonely and sexually frustrated until she begins a destructive affair with the family's gardener (Tetsuo Ishidate). Director Kurahara (The Warped OnesBlack Sun) uses a lot of interesting cinematic tricks to visualize the protagonist's inner turmoil, and Asaoka is very good in the lead. 

Source: The Criterion Channel

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I was flipping through channels and came across classic HAROLD & MAUDE which I've seen a zillion times. I kept on with some daily chores only to return to watch any scene with Vivian Pickles playing Harold's Mom. I never paid attention to her character at first, but have grown to appreciate her talent & prowess as comedic relief in the movie. She's so beautiful and completely clueless to the real world.

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I just read on Wiki she's 87. God love her.

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The Trap (1966)  -  7/10

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Wilderness adventure and romance with Oliver Reed as a brawny fur-trapper in the Canadian Pacific Northwest. He "buys" mute girl Rita Tushingham on one of his visits to town to sell his furs, and the two try to make a go of things in the rugged forests of the north. The stars are both well-cast and turn in good performances. Reed plays it big but it fits the character, and Tushingham's exaggerated facial features help assay her completely silent role. The location scenery is also a plus.

Source: internet

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Stayed up late and watched Trail.    Arthur Kennedy give a compelling and full of life performance.  He won the Oscar for Best Supporting and deserved it.     Ford and McGuire were fine, as was Katy Jurado (and looking fine as well),   but the best scenes are those  with Kennedy (as well as Robert Middleton).

PS:  the film also has some interesting moments related to race-relations.  E.g. the term white supremacy is used by the Kennedy character. 

Spoiler alert:

 

  Hey, he might have been a commie but he wasn't a racist! 

 

 

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1 minute ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Stayed up late and watched Trail.    Arthur Kennedy give a compelling and full of life performance.  He won the Oscar for Best Supporting and deserved it.     Ford and McGuire were fine, as was Katy Jurado (and looking fine as well),   but the best scenes are those  with Kennedy (as well as Robert Middleton).

 

It's Trial, not Trail. I thought you were talking about a western I hadn't seen.

And Kennedy didn't win an Oscar for it (he never won one), he was just nominated. Jack Lemmon won that year for Mister Roberts.

 

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