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12 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Stayed up late and watched Trail.    Arthur Kennedy give a compelling and full of life performance.  He won the Oscar for Best Supporting and deserved it.     Ford and McGuire were fine, as was Katy Jurado (and looking fine as well),   but the best scenes are those  with Kennedy (as well as Robert Middleton).

PS:  the film also has some interesting moments related to race-relations.  E.g. the term white supremacy is used by the Kennedy character. 

Spoiler alert:

 

  Hey, he might have been a commie but he wasn't a racist! 

 

 

 

8 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

It's Trial, not Trail. I thought you were talking about a western I hadn't seen.

And Kennedy didn't win an Oscar for it (he never won one), he was just nominated. Jack Lemmon won that year for Mister Roberts.

 

Happens to the best of us tho.

(Every now and then I like to sprinkle my posts with the occasional deliberate factual error just to make sure people are reading.)

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6 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

(Every now and then I like to sprinkle my posts with the occasional deliberate factual error just to make sure people are reading.)

I used to occasionally list "Yo Mama" as a cast member in the reviews I posted to see if anyone was reading. No one ever said anything, so I had my answer. 

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8 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I used to occasionally list "Yo Mama" as a cast member in the reviews I posted to see if anyone was reading. No one ever said anything, so I had my answer. 

Well, my mother has had an EXTENSIVE CAREER IN PSYCHOTRONIC CINEMA, So I just assumed you were talking to me

 

(not really)

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

It's Trial, not Trail. I thought you were talking about a western I hadn't seen.

And Kennedy didn't win an Oscar for it (he never won one), he was just nominated. Jack Lemmon won that year for Mister Roberts.

 

Thanks for the updated info.   Funny but I checked Wiki twice since I didn't think Kennedy had ever won an Oscar.  I just read the 'bold' part and not the "(nomination)" part.    TWICE! 

Also when I search this I also put in Trail.   I got a lot of hiking trails (since I'm a hiker and google knows this).   Dang,  looks like I need to take a hike!    

PS:  has anyone else seen Trial?    It was very relevant to current events. 

 

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Violence at Noon (1966)  -  7/10

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Japanese crime drama about a serial rapist and murderer (Kei Sato) and two women who are connected to him: his estranged wife (Akiko Koyama), and one of his victims (Saeda Kawaguchi) who has developed a strange fascination for him. Director Nagisa Oshima uses stark B&W widescreen cinematography and rapid edits to convey the emotional turmoil and desolation of his damaged characters. The film is more interested in the inner workings of these characters than in any plot-driven narrative, so the audience for this will be limited.

Source: The Criterion Channel

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5 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Thanks for the updated info.   Funny but I checked Wiki twice since I didn't think Kennedy had ever won an Oscar.  I just read the 'bold' part and not the "(nomination)" part.    TWICE! 

Also when I search this I also put in Trail.   I got a lot of hiking trails (since I'm a hiker and google knows this).   Dang,  looks like I need to take a hike!    

PS:  has anyone else seen Trial?    It was very relevant to current events. 

 

I’ve seen a pretty fair amount of it. And yeah it definitely applies to today the same way FURY or GUN CRAZY does....But to be honest with you, I kind of find Arthur Kennedy to be a bit over the top and hokey in it. I know he was regarded as an “actors actor”, but be perfectly honest with you, “actor’s actors” are very rarely – if ever – my favorite actors.

see also: Lee J Cobb, Marlon Brando, Rod Steiger- Hell, pretty much the entire male cast of “on the water front”- Although sometimes I like Karl Malden OK.

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36 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

 

see also: Lee J Cobb, Marlon Brando, Rod Steiger- Hell, pretty much the entire male cast of “on the water front”- Although sometimes I like Karl Malden OK.

How did you feel about Two Ton Tony Galento?

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46 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I’ve seen a pretty fair amount of it. And yeah it definitely applies to today the same way FURY or GUN CRAZY does....But to be honest with you, I kind of find Arthur Kennedy to be a bit over the top and hokey in it. I know he was regarded as an “actors actor”, but be perfectly honest with you, “actor’s actors” are very rarely – if ever – my favorite actors.

Kennedy can sometimes be over the top,  but in the Trial,  I felt his acting matched that of the character to a T.  This lawyer was a borderline carnival barker and required an actor like Kennedy.   So to me it worked but I understand where you're coming from.

Another film I watched yesterday was A Stolen Life;  The Bette Davis \ Glenn Ford film.    As for over-the-top but NOT matching that of the character,  see Dane Clark.    I have seen the film before but for my wife this was the first time.   Well after a few scenes with Bette and Dane,  I ask;  what do you think of Clark, the actor playing the artist.    She said something like "I hope this isn't one of your favorites,  because to me he looks phony".  Yea, Clark as a very angry, aggressive artist just didn't work for either of us.   My wife did comment on Clark's nice body (he looked buff in this film wearing a tight shirt),  but said that also didn't look like a build an artist would have!  

Even Bogie in The Two Miss Carrolls came off as an artist more so than Clark.

 

 

 

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Who Are You, Polly Maggoo? (1966)  -  7/10

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French arthouse comedy about fashion model Polly Maggoo (fashion model Dorothy McGowan), who is the toast of Parisian fashion society. She's being profiled for a TV show, and we hear her history, hopes, dreams and desires, as well as those orbiting around her. Also featuring Grayson Hall, Philippe Noiret, Jean Rochefort, Sami Frey, Alice Saprich, and Fernando Arrabal. Directed by noted photographer William Klein, this is a satire of the fashion industry as well as pop culture in general. It's very quirky and idiosyncratic, and shows a lot of visual playfulness.

Source: The Criterion Channel

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56 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

My wife did comment on Clark's nice body (he looked buff in this film wearing a tight shirt),  but said that also didn't look like a build an artist would have!  

Has your wife seen Paul Newman in What a Way to Go!?

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Last night my girlfriend and I watched The Sea Hawk(1940). Her and I loved watching the Pirates of the Caribbean movies together and I thought this would be a somewhat similar experience. It was a lot of fun. Errol Flynn was, well, Errol Flynn and the rest of the cast was great. Especially the woman who played Queen Elizabeth. She was fantastic. Great battles, solid direction from Michael Curtiz and a very heroic musical score made this a really good film. 8/10.  

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Wild Wild Winter (1966)  -  4/10

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Youth-appeal comedy-musical with surf-hero Ronnie (Gary Clarke) getting recruited by some frat guys to romance sorority head Susan (Chris Noel) who keeps a tight leash on her sorority sisters and away from the boys. They all hit the slopes for fun and romance, with some lite rock'n'roll to spice things up. Also featuring Steve Franken, Don Edmonds, Suzie Kaye, Les Brown Jr., Vicky Albright, James Wellman, Steven Rogers, Paul Geary, Val Avery, James Frawley, and Dick Miller. Musical performances are courtesy of The Astronauts, The Beau Brummels, Dick & Dee Dee, Jackie & Gayle, and Jay & The Americans. This is pretty dumb, but not as bad as some of the other similar films that I've watched recently.  Just kidding, it's terrible.

Source: internet

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10 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I was flipping through channels and came across classic HAROLD & MAUDE which I've seen a zillion times. I kept on with some daily chores only to return to watch any scene with Vivian Pickles playing Harold's Mom. I never paid attention to her character at first, but have grown to appreciate her talent & prowess as comedic relief in the movie. She's so beautiful and completely clueless to the real world.

960full-harold-and-maude-screenshot.jpg

I just read on Wiki she's 87. God love her.

She steals all her scenes. I particularly like the scene where she is filling out the computer dating questionnaire. Just the way she enunciates some of the lines is extremely funny.

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Wings (1966)  -  7/10

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Russian drama about a decorated WWII-era fighter pilot (Maya Bulgakova) who is now a lonely, middle-aged high school principal. Her mundane existence is dull drudgery punctuated by petty squabbles and bureaucratic problems, a far cry from the life-or-death struggles of her youth in the Air Force. Director Larisa Shepitko's quietly moving character study is enhanced by Bulgakova's subtle performance.

Source: The Criterion Channel

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"Myra Breckinridge" - Michael Sarne - 1970 -

it's - abysmal -

mere words could not describe the egregiousness of the film version or the so-called direction -

the actors try hard, but they haven't a chance -

the film, not the famous novel, seems to be about a movie addict who wants to destroy the masculinity of men and the femininity of women -

to be what? -

totally destructive? -

Raquel Welch and Roger Herren share the oh-so-famous male rape scene -

she's exhausted and he walks off -

only to end up in Mae West's bed -

totally undone, once again -

at the end, Raquel Welch and Rex Reed (Myra and Myron) dance off -

into a waiting taxi -

how this film got made or released is a mystery -

film_myrabreckinridge_2_780_440_90_s_c1.

 

 

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I was going to watch Women of the Prehistoric Planet on YouTube, but the **** who uploaded up misidentified it, as it ended up being Voyage to the Prehistoric Planet which I've already seen. A pox on his/her house!

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5 hours ago, Casey06 said:

Last night my girlfriend and I watched The Sea Hawk(1940). Her and I loved watching the Pirates of the Caribbean movies together and I thought this would be a somewhat similar experience. It was a lot of fun. Errol Flynn was, well, Errol Flynn and the rest of the cast was great. Especially the woman who played Queen Elizabeth. She was fantastic. Great battles, solid direction from Michael Curtiz and a very heroic musical score made this a really good film. 8/10.  

I've only seen one of the Pirates of the Caribbean series (the first one, I think) but I regard it as a contrast to The Sea Hawk rather than being a similar experience.

Yes, they both have pirates (or privateers) as their subject matter, but The Sea Hawk plays its material seriously, as does Flynn in the lead role, even if some have described the light heartedness that he brings to his swashbucklers as having a slightly mocking quality. I can thoroughly enjoy this film for its large scale epic quality and sweep of adventure, for the incredibly skilled work of Curtiz, Korngold, Flynn and all the others involved in this kind of old fashioned material which can still work when done well, and this film is most certainly done well.

The Pirates of the Caribbean film, however, refused to ever take its material seriously. It was busy laughing at the whole idea of high seas pirates of another time in anticipation of the assumption that its audience wouldn't take it seriously either, so it intentionally beat its audience to the laugh punch. "Let's all laugh at this stuff together," was the film's attitude. That plus a lot of excessive CGI effects. Johnny Depp's performance was the one saving grace of the film for me.

Pirates was made in an entirely different era from the Flynn film, of course, so, for all I know, the filmmakers are correct in their assumption about modern viewers. Or is it that the makers of this series are just not skilfull enough to make a "straight" old fashioned swashbuckler like The Sea Hawk? I suspect, in fact, it may be the latter since, after all, wouldn't many members of a modern audience watching The Sea Hawk today (once they got past their black and white film prejudice) enjoy this production on its own straight forward, adventure for adventure's sake terms (without all the laughter)?

the-sea-hawk-1940-7.jpg

SeaHawk_2.jpg

 

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Young Torless (1966)  -  7/10

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German drama from director Volker Schlondorff. Set during the turn-of-the-century and at an exclusive all-boys boarding school in Austria, the story concerns a student named Torless (Mathieu Carriere) who stands by while his classmates torment another student named Basini (Marian Siedowsky). What starts as typical school-boy hazing becomes more violent and degrading, and Torless is caught up in an internal moral quagmire as to how to proceed: report the events to the clueless faculty, join in on the tormenting, or dispassionately observe. Also featuring Bernd Tischer, Fred Dietz, Lotte Liedl, and Barbara Steele. Schlondorff's feature directing debut is a well-rendered depiction of petty cruelty and the dangers of acquiescence in the face of wrongdoing. There are no easy answers to the quandary either, as no one is shown to be blameless. 

Source: The Criterion Channel

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Myra Breckinridge is disgusting. Smut that would make even Judith Butler vomit. Poor Laurel and Hardy to have their film clips degraded after their death by incorporating them in that film.

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On 5/7/2019 at 12:18 PM, LawrenceA said:

British "kitchen sink" drama starring Alan Bates as a working class young man who falls in lust with blonde co-worker June Ritchie.

I'd like to see this one again. I remember liking it quite a bit, especially Bates' performance.  I wouldn't mind if TCM did a "kitchen sink" drama themed day or month.  (This Sporting Life;Saturday Night, Sunday Morning;The L-Shaped Room;Room at the Top)

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ROCKETMAN

That's right, the new biopic about Elton John. My husband and I went to see it tonight, at a movie theatre and everything.

I thought it was quite good; now, you would have to be at least a bit of a fan of his music, but then, why would you see it if you're not?

A lot of biopics suffer from trying to fit a person's entire lifetime, everything that happens to them, all the people they meet, etc. into a 2 hour movie. Rocketman doesn't make that mistake. It does not take a straightforward, chronological approach; rather, it treats Elton John's story as a kind of fantasy-musical, with the songs as a kind of literal soundtrack to his life. Actually, in its way it does follow the singer-songwriter's career chronologically, but it takes a lot of liberties with that, and certainly the order in which you hear the songs themselves is all over the place (chronologically, I mean.)

But none of this matters. What works in the film is the extremely sympathetic portrayal of this 70s rock superstar, and the imaginative treatment of some milestone events in his life. I would have preferred a little more emphasis on his actual music and his life-long collaboration with lyricist Bernie Taupin - after all, it's the music itself that made Elton John famous enough to have a biopic made about him. Instead, a lot of the film focuses on Elton's emotional issues, his unsuccessful struggles to gain recognition and love from his father (according to the movie he never did), his heart-breaking love affair with his manager, and his subsequent addiction issues : talk about sex and drugs and rock and roll. Elton explored the first two to dangerous excess. There's one point in the film where he declares he's "**** everything and done every drug you can think of". Plus, of course, endless drinking.

The fact that Elton John had the strength and self-knowledge to finally get himself some help is forever to his credit. It's also amazing, given the decadent excessive life-style he led for many years, that he did not die, either from AIDS (which he was lucky enough to never get) or a drug /alcohol overdose. Somehow he managed to NOT be yet another rock star casualty fallen to drugs and alcohol.

But what really counts about Elton John, what made him beloved and famous, was of course his exceptional talent as a composer and performer. I'd kind of forgotten how good he was, how , all through the 70s, he just kept writing hit after hit. Almost all of them really good, almost all of them deserving of the success they received. Funny, although I liked his stuff, I never bought any of his albums. Yet I think, no matter what your taste in music might be, no one can deny that Elton John wrote incredibly good songs, He was like a Mozart of the 20th century (along with Paul McCartney) in that melody just seemed to come to him from out of the air.

I should mention, Taron Egerton does a truly fine job as Elton; he even looks a bit like him, and does all his own singing. 

Anyway, if you like his music at all, you'll enjoy Rocketman. My one complaint is that they kind of waste what I consider to be his absolute best song, "Goodbye Yellow Brick Road". You'll know what I mean if you see the movie.

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1 hour ago, Gershwin fan said:

Myra Breckinridge is disgusting. Smut that would make even Judith Butler vomit. Poor Laurel and Hardy to have their film clips degraded after their death by incorporating them in that film.

Yes, "smut" accurately describes the substance of this film.

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