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"The Moon-Spinners" is still an excellent adventure film.

The similarity to Hitchcock - a man trying desperately to prove his innocence - is unmistakable.

And, of course, the windmill sequence remains thrilling.

Haley Mills and Peter McEnery are still unforgettable.  

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"The Girl Most Likely" - Mitchell Leisen - 1958 -

starring Jane Powell, Cliff Robertson, Keith Andes, Tommy Noonan, Una Merkel, Kaye Ballard, etc. -

Jane Powell's last musical film (from RKO, but released by U-I) is such a treat -

it is based on the Ginger Rogers classic, "Tom, Dick or Harry" -

in the film, Jane Powell is in love - with love -

and unexpectedly besieged by three suitors -

Tommy Noonan, Cliff Robertson and Keith Andes -

the poor girl, she can't make her mind up -

the screenplay is bright and lively -

the music is by the legendary Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane -

my favorite is "Chief Crazy Horse" -

the choreography is by the legendary Gower Champion -

and, boy, these sequences are knockouts -

especially the one in which Jane and the gang dance on water -

this film seems to have no substantial reputation -

but it is a high-quality musical -

so who would you choose -

Tommy Noonan, Cliff Robertson or Keith Andes? -

I chose -

no, I can't spoil the ending -

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17 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

(Peter McEnery, he was Dirk Bogarde's boy toy in "Victim")

:(  Awww..............JIM-----

Seems you fell "victim" to using the phrase "boy toy" not in it's original intended form.  :unsure:

Sepiatone

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I stumbled across a 2009 documentary on pinball machines called SPECIAL WHEN LIT while flipping through PLUTO TV. As a big fan of pinball machines and in the amusement biz, I know a fair bit about them, witnessing their evolution the past 40 years. (my home machine is Chicago Coin's "Hollywood")

This documentary illustrated their historic beginnings and the inner workings of their conception, design and marketing. Several points were brought up that I did not know: Pinball Machines were considered gambling and were banned in all US states at one time! Only in the 50's did they start trickling into acceptance as "entertainment only" siting the flippers made it a "game of skill". By the mid 70's, pinballs were common throughout the US, perfect timing for bored teen TikiSoo to spend endless hours hanging out at the arcade.

It stated 90% of machines built prior were shipped to Europe. Who knew? Obviously the filmmakers, since this is a British documentary. The pinball industry made more money than the film industry in the US between 1950-1970!

The documentary visits the only remaining manufacturer of these machines and discusses their design, psychology and shows they are all built by hand. It also profiles fans & players, a National competition and a NYC Arcade owner-all great interviews that flesh out many aspects of pinball's appeal. 

I was impressed with the clever closing credits of digital style framing & lettering, indicative of new "digital" pinballs. It's a clever bookend to the opening credits featuring old style artwork:

I recommend this one!

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3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

:(  Awww..............JIM-----

Seems you fell "victim" to using the phrase "boy toy" not in it's original intended form.  :unsure:

Sepiatone

In the film, "Victim", Dirk Bogarde and Peter McEnery never got to the "boy-toy" phrase of their relationship.

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If you really (and cluelessly) believe "boy toy" originally refers to a younger man who's the paramour of an older partner, then you got the term ALL WRONG!  :rolleyes:

Sepiatone

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Batman  Season Two (1966-1967)

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The camp adventures of the caped crusader continued in the second season, consisting of 60 (!!!) half-hour episodes. Most stories were two-parters, but there were also a pair of three-part stories. Adam West and Burt Ward returned as Batman and Robin, as did supporting performers Alan Napier, Neil Hamilton, Stafford Repp, and Madge Blake.

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Villains appearing this season included returning adversaries Julie Newmar as Catwoman (6 stories), Cesar Romero as the Joker (4 stories), Burgess Meredith as the Penguin (4 stories), Victor Buono as King Tut (2 stories), and David Wayne as the Mad Hatter. First-season villain Mr. Freeze returned twice, each time played by different actors, first Otto Preminger, then Eli Wallach. The Riddler had been the first season's most frequent villain, but when Frank Gorshin got into a salary dispute with the producers, first the showrunners had one script rewritten and the villain changed to the Puzzler (Maurice Evans), and later recast the Riddler with John Astin, who made a single story appearance this season.

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New villains included Art Carney as the Archer, Van Johnson as the Minstrel, Shelley Winters as Ma Parker, Walter Slezak as the Clock King, Vincent Price as Egghead, Liberace as Chandell, Cliff Robertson as Shame, Michael Rennie as the Sandman, Roger C. Carmel as Colonel Gumm, and Tallulah Bankhead as Black Widow. Carolyn Jones also appeared as Marsha, Queen of Diamonds, the only new antagonist to make appearances in two separate stories. 

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The second season saw the "window cameo" become a recurring feature. As Batman and Robin slowly scale the side of a high-rise, various celebrities and characters would pop out of a window and have a brief exchange with the Dynamic Duo. These cameos included Dick Clark, Don Ho, Santa Claus, Lurch from The Addams Family, and Edward G. Robinson, as well as many others. There were also many cameos by well-known people in small walk-on bits, including Phyllis Diller as a cleaning lady, Milton Berle as a prison guard, Jack Carter as a radio DJ, Sam Jaffe as a poor man, George Raft as George Raft, and hairstylist Jay Sebring as "Jay Oceanbring". Sebring would later become a victim of the Manson family. 

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There was also a crossover storyline featuring Green Hornet (Van Williams) and Kato (Bruce Lee) who had earlier made a "window cameo". As if all of the above wasn't enough, there were also appearances and performances by Paul Revere & the Raiders, Chad & Jeremy, and Lesley Gore. Gore appeared as "Pussycat", Catwoman's answer to Robin. That ended up being one of my favorite two-parters of the season. 

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Source: Warner DVD

P.S.: Today just happens to be Burt Ward's 74th birthday. Happy Birthday, Robin!

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Shelley Winters as Ma Parker,

Funny that she would go on to play Ma Barker in Bloody Mama.

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Doctor Who (1966)

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I watched a couple of "pieces" of Doctor Who. The first was from the Lost In Time DVD set, and it was the sole remaining chapter of the third season serial "The Celestial Toymaker". It was the last of the four-part story, so I had no idea what was going on. It was something about the Doctor (William Hartnell) and his current companions Steven (Peter Purves) and Dodo (Jackie Lane) being in competition with a powerful game-playing alien known as The Toymaker (Michael Gough). It reminded me a bit of the Q episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation.

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I also watched "The Tenth Planet", a four-part serial from early in the show's fourth season. It's notable for a couple of reasons. It introduces the Cybermen, robotically-enhanced humanoids from our solar system's previously unknown tenth planet. They would go on to be one of the series' more enduring antagonists. The serial also marked the end of William Hartnell as the Doctor, and the introduction of the character's periodic "regenerations", a clever way the show's producers had of explaining cast changes. The Doctor's alien race are very long-lived, but they can regenerate into younger bodies when necessary. In this case, Hartnell passed the role onto Patrick Troughton, "the Second Doctor". I enjoyed this serial, even if the Cybermen looked rather silly. The last of the four chapters is lost, so for this release the producers commissioned an animated re-creation, using the existing audio tracks.

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Source: Warner/BBC DVD 

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3 hours ago, Fedya said:

Funny that she would go on to play Ma Barker in Bloody Mama.

Feyda,

You haven't lived until you've seen Shelley in a made-for-tv movie playing Elvis's Mother Gladys Presley.

Kurt Russell played Elvis. It was the antithesis of her great performance in "A Patch of Blue".

 

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Looks like you're talking Ben Mankiewicz, and not the movie about a boy and his rat.

The movie is hilariously awful, with perhaps the best bit being the boy coming up with the title song doing his best Rex Harrison Sprechgesang at the piano.

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The very first Dean Martin show 16 September 1965. Deano was great on YT, BTW and streamed to the big screen.

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I had a big past couple of watching days! So here goes a bunch!

I saw for the first time in many years The Wizard of Oz(1939). I know I watched it when I was a kid but of course that was at least 15 years ago. It lived up to the hype for me! Wonderful costumes, music, sets and some pretty hilarious comedy. After all these years I can honestly say that I love this movie. 10/10. 

I also watched Wake Island(1942). Meh, just another war propaganda film made during World War 2. Never have cared for those. Not terrible though, had good acting and action sequences. But it shouldn’t have been made until the true story was over. Nothing special. 4/10.

I also watched Last Train From Gun Hill(1959). Love me some John Sturges and this was a great movie. It has Kirk Douglas and Anthony Quinn, who both did great jobs. It’s a western that reminded me of 3:10 to Yuma. Not as good as that film, but it’s an entertaining was to spend an hour and a half. 8/10. 

Then I watched O Brother Where Art Thou(2000). I had a blast with this film. I love the Coen Brothers and would easily call this one of my favorites of theirs.  George Clooney and the rest of the cast are great and that music though!!! Great visuals to. Such a fun and unique movie. 9/10.

Halfway  there. Next I watched Funny Girl(1968). Streisand knocked out of ever park! She Oozed charisma and she has some pipes on her! Omar Sharif is also great as usual but this is the Barbra Streisand showcase movie here. Great songs, acting and one of the best musicals I’ve seen. 8/10. 

Next I watched The Thin Man(1934). Powell and Loy are so fun to watch and it’s just good entertainment. It’s smart, funny and a great way to spend an hour and a half. 9/10.

I introduced my girlfriend to some silent comedy and watched Buster Keaton’s Steamboat Bill Jr.(1928). This movie was so great! It was hilarious and full of memorable bits and characters. I would say that this is my favorite Buster Keaton film. Must see! 10/10.

And finally, we watched Seven Brides For Seven Brothers(1954). Okay, I enjoyed this movie. It’s got some questionable themes and dated moments(flat out kidnapping!!!). But it’s got great songs and some amazing dance numbers and the characters are pretty likable, kidnapping aside. Interesting look back in Time. It’s no Singin’ In the Rain, but I recommend it if you enjoy classic musicals. 8/10.

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8 hours ago, Casey06 said:

I saw for the first time in many years The Wizard of Oz(1939). 

Then I watched O Brother Where Art Thou(2000). I had a blast with this film. Such a fun and unique movie. 

Halfway  there. Next I watched Funny Girl(1968). Streisand knocked out of ever park! She Oozed charisma and she has some pipes on her! Great songs, acting and one of the best musicals I’ve seen.  

And finally, we watched Seven Brides For Seven Brothers(1954). Okay, I enjoyed this movie. Interesting look back in Time. 

First I have to say Casey, I'm always confusing your posts with long time member Lawrence because of your avatar. I thought "wha? Lawrence hasn't seen TWOZ since he was a kid? Then I realized you are a relative newcomer here and presume by your writing you're "younger" meaning "not retirement age" 😎

So I'm glad you revisited these musicals because I like hearing how they strike a new generation of classic movie fans. It's tough getting younger people -especially males- to watch classic films, especially musicals.

In fact, O Brother Where Art Thou? is my stepping stone movie to bring new classic movie viewers to musicals. Coen Bros movies can be over the top brutal violence, but other CB movies can be quite fanciful & gentle.

I'm also excited that YOU were excited by Barbra Streisand. Streisand was ubiquitous my entire life and when I first saw FUNNY GIRL about a decade ago, I was blown away just like you (and everyone else) I do think Babs is a rare talent and find her still a powerhouse entertainer...but seeing her so young, just starting out is just AMAZING.

I highly recommend you watch WHAT'S UP DOC? containing trifecta adorable Streisand, co starring the under appreciated Ryan O'Neal, directed by the great Peter Bogdanovich.

Glad you got past the weird setting & socially incorrect 7 Brides. It's doubly tough getting any modern guy to watch a musical about "lumberjacks", but once you accept it, the movie is great. I think it contains my favorite songs & dance numbers of any musical. I howled the first time seeing the twist ending!

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CASEY, FRIDAY'S showing of THE WIZARD OF OZ  marked my 61ST viewing of the movie on TV.  I saw the first telecast in '56, and never missed an annual showing since '59(when the annual showings began) and when it was stopped being shown annually in the mid '90s, I always made sure I watched my VHS( and now DVD) of the movie at LEAST once a year since then.  After all, didn't TEVYE sing something about "Tradition"?  ;) 

As far as watching musical lumberjacks, I have NO problem with it!  ;)  :D 

 

Sepiatone

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2 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

First I have to say Casey, I'm always confusing your posts with long time member Lawrence because of your avatar. I thought "wha? Lawrence hasn't seen TWOZ since he was a kid? Then I realized you are a relative newcomer here and presume by your writing you're "younger" meaning "not retirement age" 😎

So I'm glad you revisited these musicals because I like hearing how they strike a new generation of classic movie fans. It's tough getting younger people -especially males- to watch classic films, especially musicals.

In fact, O Brother Where Art Thou? is my stepping stone movie to bring new classic movie viewers to musicals. Coen Bros movies can be over the top brutal violence, but other CB movies can be quite fanciful & gentle.

I'm also excited that YOU were excited by Barbra Streisand. Streisand was ubiquitous my entire life and when I first saw FUNNY GIRL about a decade ago, I was blown away just like you (and everyone else) I do think Babs is a rare talent and find her still a powerhouse entertainer...but seeing her so young, just starting out is just AMAZING.

I highly recommend you watch WHAT'S UP DOC? containing trifecta adorable Streisand, co starring the under appreciated Ryan O'Neal, directed by the great Peter Bogdanovich.

Glad you got past the weird setting & socially incorrect 7 Brides. It's doubly tough getting any modern guy to watch a musical about "lumberjacks", but once you accept it, the movie is great. I think it contains my favorite songs & dance numbers of any musical. I howled the first time seeing the twist ending!

I’m 22 now and I’m pretty sure I was 6 or 7 when I watched it. I was surprised by how little I remembered of it! It’s hilarious since my mom hates that film. Only because to this day she is legitimately terrified of Margret Hamilton’s wicked witch!!! 

I don’t know if I would consider O Brother Where Art Thou a musical, but the musical segments were great. And I live  in Tennessee where that kind of music is everywhere. 

I never had much of an opinion on Streisand before Funny Girl, but I thought she was so brilliant in that movie. And damn it “Don’t Rain on My Parade” was so great! 

My girlfriend and I couldn’t stop talking about how dated but entertaining Seven Brides was. She’s a dancer herself so she was amazed with the choreography. We kept trying justify in our minds what in the world happened. But we laughed and smiled the whole way through anyway. Sadly my favorite song was the one about kidnapping women!!! It was just so catchy and bouncy lol!

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On 3/24/2019 at 2:17 PM, LawrenceA said:

Expresso Bongo (1959)  -  6/10

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British musical satire of the record industry, with Laurence Harvey as a fast-talking talent manager who discovers Cliff Richard (and the Shadows) playing bongos in a nightclub. Harvey ushers the boy to stardom, with the attendant rewards and pitfalls. Also featuring Sylvia Syms, Yolande Donlan, Meier Tzelniker, Ambrosine Phillpotts, Eric Pohlmann, Burt Kwouk, Wilfrid Lawson, Susan Hampshire, and Hermione Baddeley. Harvey goes at it with gusto and is fun to watch. The story loses steam before it's over, and the movie is about 20 minutes too long, but there's still some enjoyment in the setting. And Syms, as Harvey's stripper girlfriend, is appealing.

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The first half crackles with raw energy due to Lawrence Harvey's adrenaline fueled, funny performance as the shyster-hipster rock-n-roll manager/star maker. If you only remember his grim, sullen characterizations, watch him go like The Roadrunner here. He never got another role so kinetic. This is a film that TCM should program more often (with Beat Girl, another Brit film from that era). Unfortunately the Kino DVD used a butchered version that eliminated several short musical numbers, something that Kino didn't mention in their marketing (an annoying lesson for me), including the duet Nausea by record label boss Meier Tzelniker and Harvey. The second half does fizzle out as LawrenceA wrote because the story shifts more to Bongo Herbert (Cliff Richards) and Yolande Donlan, director Val Guest's wife. A 1986 British film Absolute Beginners borrows heavily from Expresso Bongo.

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14 hours ago, Casey06 said:

And finally, we watched Seven Brides For Seven Brothers(1954). Okay, I enjoyed this movie. It’s got some questionable themes and dated moments(flat out kidnapping!!!). But it’s got great songs and some amazing dance numbers and the characters are pretty likable, kidnapping aside. Interesting look back in Time. It’s no Singin’ In the Rain, but I recommend it if you enjoy classic musicals. 8/10.

I'm glad you liked this film too.  I like it as well despite the questionable plot lines and I find all the brothers' red hair to look goofy.  I loved the costumes and Russ Tamblyn's acrobatics.  The Barn Raising dance is one of the all-time best dance numbers.  I also love this film because it takes place in my home state of Oregon 🙂 Oregon doesn't seem to have much of a presence in classic film, so when the state or cities are mentioned, it is fun 🙂

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2 hours ago, Casey06 said:

I’m 22 now and I’m pretty sure I was 6 or 7 when I watched it. I was surprised by how little I remembered of it! It’s hilarious since my mom hates that film. Only because to this day she is legitimately terrified of Margret Hamilton’s wicked witch!!! 

I'm glad you enjoyed The Wizard of Oz.  I grew up watching it on TV every year, until it stopped airing.  I love the Wicked Witch--she's my favorite character.  I feel like Glinda is the real villain of the story.  Legally, as the next of kin, the Wicked Witch of the West was entitled to the slippers.  Glinda just stole them and gave them away.  Then at the end, she has the gall to tell Dorothy that she could have gone home the entire time--after Dorothy had already been endured being drugged and later kidnapped! 

The Wizard of Oz isn't one of my go-to films throughout the year, but I enjoy watching it.  It's usually good for an annual viewing.  I saw it in the theater earlier this year when TCM/Fathom was doing a showing for The Wizard of Oz' 80th birthday. I also saw it in the theater at some point in the late 90s when it was re-released. 

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2 hours ago, Casey06 said:

I don’t know if I would consider O Brother Where Art Thou a musical, but the musical segments were great. And I live  in Tennessee where that kind of music is everywhere. 

I don't know why I responded to your post in three separate posts, but too late now.

O Brother Where Art Thou? came out when I was in high school.  While I remember the film being popular, it was the soundtrack that was really big.  Bluegrass became very popular among high-schoolers in 2000.  Lol. I loved the "Big Rock Candy Mountain" song. 

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I'm watching Born Yesterday for the second time and wondering again why Judy Holliday didn't make more movies.  It's such a good story and she's perfect in it. I even like William Holden in it and sometimes I can't stand him ("Picnic.")

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I'm watching Born Yesterday as well. I like this film more and more each time I see it.  When I saw it for the first time, I found Broderick Crawford's character so off-putting that it really ruined the film for me.  But as I watch it more and more, Judy Holliday and William Holden's characters nicely contrast Crawford's character.  I find Holden's constant belief in Holliday's ability to learn and be more than just Crawford's floozy very refreshing.  I loved Holliday's evolution throughout the film. My favorite scene is when Holliday and Crawford play gin rummy.  For some reason, I find Holliday's card movement mesmerizing. 

Holden is one of my favorite actors, I've loved him in almost everything I've seen him in (except Golden Boy.  Made 10 years later, I think Tony Curtis would have been excellent in this part.  And maybe by then, Lee J. Cobb would have been old enough to play the dad).  Picnic is one of my favorite films.  I also loved Holden in Sabrina, Sunset Blvd, Network, Executive Suite, The Moon is Blue, and Escape From Fort Bravo. Plus, he was fantastic playing himself in I Love Lucy.  Holden's performance is definitely among the best of the celebrity appearances in the series. 

Image result for la at last i love lucy

The look on William Holden's face when Lucy turns around after re-doing her nose is the funniest part of the entire episode. Add in Desi Arnaz' facial expression and this scene always cracks me up, even after the 100th time seeing it. 

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5 hours ago, jameselliot said:

The first half crackles with raw energy due to Lawrence Harvey's adrenaline fueled, funny performance as the shyster-hipster rock-n-roll manager/star maker.

I've never seen this movie but it sounds intriguing especially for Laurence Harvey.  He's so good at playing slimy (for lack of a better word) characters or characters with moral ambiguity.  Maybe TCM will show Expresso Bongo sometime along with Darling, Room at the Top, Manchurian Candidate, The Running Man maybe Butterfield8.  

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On 7/6/2019 at 8:12 PM, Casey06 said:

I had a big past couple of watching days! So here goes a bunch!

Then I watched O Brother Where Art Thou(2000). I had a blast with this film. I love the Coen Brothers and would easily call this one of my favorites of theirs.  George Clooney and the rest of the cast are great and that music though!!! Great visuals to. Such a fun and unique movie. 9/10.

Halfway  there. Next I watched Funny Girl(1968). Streisand knocked out of ever park! She Oozed charisma and she has some pipes on her! Omar Sharif is also great as usual but this is the Barbra Streisand showcase movie here. Great songs, acting and one of the best musicals I’ve seen. 8/10. 

Next I watched The Thin Man(1934). Powell and Loy are so fun to watch and it’s just good entertainment. It’s smart, funny and a great way to spend an hour and a half. 9/10.

I introduced my girlfriend to some silent comedy and watched Buster Keaton’s Steamboat Bill Jr.(1928). This movie was so great! It was hilarious and full of memorable bits and characters. I would say that this is my favorite Buster Keaton film. Must see! 10/10.

And finally, we watched Seven Brides For Seven Brothers(1954). Okay, I enjoyed this movie. It’s got some questionable themes and dated moments(flat out kidnapping!!!). But it’s got great songs and some amazing dance numbers and the characters are pretty likable, kidnapping aside. Interesting look back in Time. It’s no Singin’ In the Rain, but I recommend it if you enjoy classic musicals. 8/10.

1. O Brother Where Art Thou is probably one of the best movies I watched last year. I was astounded by how naturally funny George Clooney was. John Turturro and Tim Blake Nelson do a great job as Clooney's companions in the film. Not to mention Holly Hunter as Clooney's wife ("he's bona fide").

2. I love Streisand, so this was nice to hear. I agree that she came across as very likable on screen. 

3. The Thin Man is one of my favorite movies of all time; not to mention one of my favorite screen partnerships of all time (Powell and Loy). In fact, I like it so much, I made it my username on this site. They just always seem to have such good fun whenever they're on screen together. 

4. I haven't seen any of Keaton's work (in its entirety, I mean). I'll have to give this one a try :) 

5. I also love "7 Brides." I showed it to my friends and they made fun of it a little, but they managed to watch the whole thing with me, which I count as a plus. The song and dance numbers never cease to amaze me, regardless of how many times I've seen this film. 

Thanks for all these reviews! I've seen a couple of your posts and have enjoyed reading them thus far. 

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