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10 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Remember AABBA rhyme structure!

 

You are the dancing queen, young and sweet, only seventeen
Dancing queen, feel the beat from the tambourine
You can dance, you can jive, having the time of your life
See that girl, watch that scene, diggin' the dancing queen 

(oops, thought you meant ABBA)

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Where Danger Lives (1950)

This was an old Noir Alley recording--recorded during the days when Noir Alley only aired Sundays at 7am! Anyway, I loved Eddie's intro.  He had Robert Mitchum's son Chris with him.  It was interesting hearing Chris' recollections of his father and his acting career.  Eddie is such a great interviewer.  It'd be neat if he could have a Private Screenings-esque program, perhaps a spin-off of Noir Alley where he interviews persons connected with major noir productions (actors, crew, etc.) or even someone associated, like an actor's children, e.g. 

Anyway. 

Where Danger Lives was an interesting film.  In Mitchum's last RKO film, he plays a doctor who saves a young woman from a suicide attempt.  The young woman, played by Faith Domergue, is very mysterious.  She gives the hospital a fake name and address, then later sends Mitchum a telegram asking him to meet her. Mitchum does and he finds himself entranced by her beauty.  Then, I'm guessing some time has passed, because all of a sudden he's meeting her at a club, greeting her with a romantic kiss.  She asks him if he loves her, says she loves him.  I'm thinking, "it's only been a couple days?" Regardless, like many old Hollywood films, they seem to fall in love rather quickly.  Then Domergue drops a bombshell, she and her elderly father are leaving that night for the Bahamas.  Then she bails.

Mitchum, like a s c h m u c k, drowns his sorrow in half a dozen coconut cocktails and decides to go to Domergue's home to plead with her to stay.  Because showing up at your girlfriend's home, drunk, expecting to meet her father, will go over well.  Anyway, Mitchum shows up at the house, meets Domergue's father, Claude Rains.  He quickly learns that all is not what it seems.

Claude Rains and Maureen O'Sullivan are third and fourth billed, respectively.  Their combined screen time is maybe 10 minutes.  I assume that O'Sullivan was there because her husband, John Farrow, was the director.  This film didn't need someone of her caliber for the part of Julie the nurse.  Any actress could have played that part.  Like in many of these classic films featuring doctors and nurses, the nurse is in love with the doctor.  It takes the doctor dating someone else for him to realize that he too, loves his nurse.  Rains was awesome. I wish there was more of him in the film. He has such a great voice and face. One never really knows whether he's on the up and up.

Mitchum was fantastic, per usual.  He's such an attractive guy and that voice! The great thing about Mitchum is that he can be romantic or a total creep and he doesn't really do anything different. 

Domergue was okay as the femme fatale.  There wasn't really anything special about her performance. She definitely paled in comparison with Mitchum and Rains.  I can't help but wonder what someone like Jean Simmons would have done in this role--she was excellent with Mitchum in Angel Face

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Also QUEEN BEE and the SOMETHING BORROWED, SOMEONE BLUE episode of MURDER SHE WROTE .

Let us not forget that Betsy Palmer also played Jason's mom in Friday the 13th

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4 hours ago, EricJ said:

I'm sitting here, staring at the damage one book-illiterate Broadway musical has done to an entire female generation.  (Er, "Wicked", that is, not the "Mean Girls" musical.)

Are you implying that I am "damaged" ?

I have never seen Wicked nor have I read the book.  What you see here is all me. Lol. 

And I do love Mean Girls, the movie, I haven't seen the musical.  

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The Man from U.N.C.L.E. - Season Three (1966-1967)

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30 more hour-long episodes of the espionage adventure series with Napoleon Solo (Robert Vaughn) and Illya Kuryakin (David McCallum) as agents fighting international crime. Leo G. Carroll also returns as boss Alexander Waverly. The show took a noticeable dip in quality this season, with the often-poorly-written scripts turning more comical and silly. Even the production values seemed lessened, with cheaper looking sets and minimal location shooting. Vaughn and McCallum also seem to be getting bored.

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The worst episodes of the season, and there were many to choose from, including one story with Sonny and Cher involving a secret formula embroidered into a dress design, and an Africa-set episode that had Solo getting captured by a Tarzan-esque woman named Girl (Vitina Marcus) who lives in a tree with a gorilla. 

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There were 2 two-part episodes, and they were the best of the season. One featured Herbert Lom as a bad guy searching for a formula that could extract gold from sea water. The other guest stars included Joan Crawford, Kim Darby, Telly Savalas, Curt Jurgens, Terry-Thomas, Diane McBain, Irene Tsu, Philip Ahn, and Jill Ireland (in a fringe bikini).

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But my favorite episode(s) of the season was "The Concrete Overcoat Affair", which featured Jack Palance (in a fun, offbeat performance) as a nervous, fussy THRUSH boss, and Janet Leigh outstanding as his chipper, perky secretary who also happens to be a master assassin who gets a thrill out of killing. There's also a goofy subplot about Solo being chased by elderly Sicilian gangsters (played by Eduardo Ciannelli, Jack La Rue, and Allen Jenkins) who want to force the agent to marry their niece (Leticia Roman). There are also appearances by Frank Puglia, Maxie Rosenbloom, Vince Barnett, Elisha Cook, and Joan Blondell.

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Source: Warner DVD

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2 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Are you implying that I am "damaged" ?

I have never seen Wicked nor have I read the book.  What you see here is all me. Lol. 

And I do love Mean Girls, the movie, I haven't seen the musical.  

I saw "Wicked" when it toured through Albuquerque back when I lived there. I've always enjoyed it. Not in my top 10, but it's a fun time. 

I haven't seen the "Mean Girls" musical, although I do own the cast album, and while it's not a prolific musical by any means, it is also a fun time. I appreciate it when movies/musicals manage to entertain me. 

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22 hours ago, SansFin said:

I believe this is simply an example of sloppy writing to cover a plot hole. It has been many, many years since I have read the books but I seem to recall that it was not Glinda who supplied that information at that point. The screenwriter opted to telescope the witches of north and south into one character. This created problems and he could not be bothered to find meaningful solutions. 

Yes, in the book Glinda is the Sorceress of the South, never referred to as a witch in this or other subsequent Oz books. The Good Witch of the North, a different character, is the one who appears to Dorothy after the house lands on the Wicked Witch of the East. Glinda never appears in the book until after the Wicked Witch of the West has been melted. Dorothy, Toto, the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, and the Cowardly Lion have further adventures as they travel through the Quadling Country to get to Glinda's castle.

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Blast of Silence (1961) is a pretty, pretty, pretty, good flick and maybe somewhat of a sleeper since I have not heard tell of it no how on these boards. It is the story of a hit man. The circumstances which comprise the plight of the average noir hero (or anti-hero) are probably many and varied. A guy might be living an ordinary life and suddenly be hurled into the mire by fate. Or another maybe a guy who has a dangerous life style but finally makes the mistake that begins the nightmare. In this case, however, the hero has apparently and seemingly been so afflicted since the womb. This is wonderfully depicted in an opening sequence that should go down as a classic, in my view. I shall not reveal it but it is immensely satisfying and an excellent way to begin the show.

This movie made me appreciate the professionalism of what it might be like to be hit man. Not that it would appeal to me, personally, but this guy knows what he's doing (although he wavers somewhat in this story, ouch). We follow the planning leading up to thing itself but the movie is less about the situation and much more the man, his mental state. To that degree that he is good at what he does, to that same degree perhaps, he is not so good at feeling good and being happy. This is dramatized by a rare second-person narration, which (as a reminder) goes something like this:

You open your eyes and it's a new day and the same feeling comes over you just like yesterday, that clammy feeling, and that feeling of hatred, for your old man, for yesterday, for today, for tomorrow, for Christmas, for just about everything, and you wonder will this ever end ...

...a voice-over that works quite well and is mercifully not overdone or too overbearing. It works because it tells the viewer what's going through the guy's head and how he is experiencing it, an economical way time-wise of letting us know this guy.

I had never heard of any of the players, a bunch of no-namers (to me at least) and I found that refreshing, no hearkening back to any prior roles. The lead is not a veteran actor (I don't believe) and his performance perhaps shows as he comes off rather stiff, even a little dull. The good news is that it works for the character, who is a loner, socially inept (with women as well as with prior male buddy acquaintances he comes across), all serving to accentuate his obvious isolation. Some of his lines seem awkward, but as I say, it works. That's just the way Frankie Bono is.

There is a greasy gun dealer that is played by a soft-spoken fat man, a small but juicy role. There is also a sweet girl who is sympathetic to Frankie but to only to a point, she is way to far on the right side of the tracks. I really liked  her, both the character and the actress. There are no femmes fatales. Frankie is messed up enough, he doesn't need one of those to do him in.

There is a neo-realistic element. The camera takes to the street of NYC, mostly Manhattan; Rockefeller Center at Christmas time (where everyone seems happy except Frankie), Staten Island (the Ferry) and elsewhere. Some of you NYers would probably recognize more that I could.

I won't say much about the story except that given Frankie Bono's character, the norm for him would probably entail going the job site (if you will, whatever city) and carry out his dastardly task in the time allotted, spending most of his time in a hotel alone. But here, a chance encounter with a old friend (from the orphanage) leads to involvement with still others (including the girl) and this drives the story. New conflicts arise in the already troubled mind of Frankie Bono and he considers the possibility of change. Can he do it?

I don't know if this has ever been shown on TCM, no idea. Noir fans who haven't seen this definitely should. It probably doesn't rise to highest level of the genre (or maybe I'm not giving enough credit) but it's certainly a good watch, and again, the opening sequence is superb.  ////

 

 

 

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My apologies to those who prefer we discuss "classic" movies in this thread, but we just finished watching JUSTIFIED. The FX series which ran from 2010 to 2015. It may be the best show I've seen since we began steaming and binge watching two years ago. Having been raised in a small Southern town, I knew a lot of people who resemble these fictional characters of Harlin, Kentucky. The acting is superb. While the storyline is at least a million miles from DOWNTON ABBEY, I have some of the same feelings of loss I experienced when that series ended. I'm going to miss Raylon, Boyd, Ava and all of the other intriguing people with which I spent the last month night after night. Here's hoping there is another show out there somewhere that will capture my attention as much as this one. I'm interested to know if anyone else out there in movie fan world shares my love for JUSTIFIED.

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23 minutes ago, Hoganman1 said:

My apologies to those who prefer we discuss "classic" movies in this thread,

There are no rules here! It's just a place for people to share things that they've recently seen. It's interesting to see what other interests people might have outside of our shared interest of classic film. 

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Beware My Lovely (1952) 

This was a great noir.  I recorded this Noir Alley back at Christmas time and kept "watching" it, but not really watching it.  So last night, I actually watched this movie without distraction.  Well except for the bird.  He's always distracting.  I only had to rewind a couple times. 

Anyway.

In this noir, which I suppose can be considered a Christmas film as it takes place at Christmastime.  Robert Ryan portrays a handyman who also has some psychological issues.  I am not sure what exactly his condition is as I'm not a doctor, but it involves him blacking out and becoming very violent, then coming to, being perfectly fine and charming, and having no idea what had just happened.  It seems that Ryan's issues stem from being turned down for service during WWI and his feeling deep shame for not being able to "man-up" (so to speak) and serve his country.  He flips out whenever he feels that he is being made fun of or being shamed. 

The film starts with Ryan working on a woman's home.  He finishes up his job and goes to look for his employer.  He finds her dead in the kitchen and freaks out and leaves.  Two things I noticed in this scene: 1) The corpse of his employer blinks in her close-up; and 2) Ryan turns on the sink to fill a bucket, sees the dead body, and leaves.  He did not turn off the water. Anyway, he hops a freighter and starts over in a new town.  He ends up being hired by a war widow, Ida Lupino.

Things start off innocently enough, but soon Ryan is exhibiting odd behavior.  He finds himself becoming upset when coming across a photograph of Lupino's late husband, a war hero who was killed in WWI (Film takes place just after the end of the war, Christmastime 1918). The war hero is William Talman, the serial killer hitchhiker from Lupino's 1953 film, The Hitch-Hiker. Anyway, then things really go off the rails when Ryan's occupation is mocked by Lupino's shrew niece, Barbara Whiting who offers rather antiquated notions that scrubbing floors and cleaning was "woman's work."  Who wants to scrub floors and clean? If Ryan wants to do it, I say more power to him! Ryan is rightfully upset and chases her out of the house.  

After this, Ryan oscillates between being nice and charming to being a lunatic.  Poor Lupino is held captive in her home and any attempt to escape it met with even more hostility.  Ryan easily overpowers any attempt she makes to escape his clutches.

Ryan's manic behavior was present throughout almost the entirety of the film.  I was on the edge of my seat waiting to see if poor Ida was going to make it out alive.

I liked the ending of the film.  Like Muller noted, on the surface it seems a little too nice and happy.  But in reality, it's actually rather unsettling, because there is no real closure to either Ryan or Lupino's story. 

As an aside, does Robert Ryan ever appear in a film where he doesn't play someone who is creepy or terrible? Is there a Robert Ryan film where he's a romantic lead? 

 

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12 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

As an aside, does Robert Ryan ever appear in a film where he doesn't play someone who is creepy or terrible? Is there a Robert Ryan film where he's a romantic lead? 

Born to be Bad,  where Ryan isn't a bad guy,  but an author that romances born-to-be-bad girl Joan Fontaine.

Interesting 1950 film that also has Zachery Scott, Joan Leslie and best of all Mel Ferrer as painter Gooby (a person that Joan can't sink her teeth into).

 

 

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I think Beware My Lovely has started me on a Robert Ryan kick.  I just got Bad Day at Black Rock at the library, and I put in transfer requests for the following: The Racket,  Caught, and Clash By Night.  I've actually seen Clash By Night before, as I watched it before for Barbara Stanwyck and Marilyn Monroe.  I recall being bored by it.  I'm going to give it another chance and see if Ryan makes it more interesting.

I have these films on my DVR:

Tender Comrade, which I've seen, but need to re-watch.  I remember Ginger Rogers' role more than anything.

The Naked Spur

God's Little Acre

 

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Born to be Bad,  where Ryan isn't a bad guy,  but an author that romances born-to-be-bad girl Joan Fontaine.

Interesting 1950 film that also has Zachery Scott, Joan Leslie and best of all Mel Ferrer as painter Gooby (a person that Joan can't sink her teeth into).

I've seen this film before, but I should re-watch it.  I like everyone in the cast. I also like that Ferrer's character is named "Gooby." 

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12 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I think Beware My Lovely has started me on a Robert Ryan kick.  I just got Bad Day at Black Rock at the library, and I put in transfer requests for the following: The Racket,  Caught, and Clash By Night.  I've actually seen Clash By Night before, as I watched it before for Barbara Stanwyck and Marilyn Monroe.  I recall being bored by it.  I'm going to give it another chance and see if Ryan makes it more interesting.

I have these films on my DVR:

Tender Comrade, which I've seen, but need to re-watch.  I remember Ginger Rogers' role more than anything.

The Naked Spur

God's Little Acre

 

Have you seen The Set-Up? I would call that one an essential Robert Ryan movie. And Crossfire, of course.

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

As an aside, does Robert Ryan ever appear in a film where he doesn't play someone who is creepy or terrible? Is there a Robert Ryan film where he's a romantic lead? 

Her Twelve Men, an MGM schmaltz film, where he's opposite Greer Garson.

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10 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Have you seen The Set-Up? I would call that one an essential Robert Ryan movie. And Crossfire, of course.

I have seen both films.  Those were excellent. I actually just purchased The Set-Up a couple weeks ago.  I found it used for $7. 

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11 minutes ago, Fedya said:

Her Twelve Men, an MGM schmaltz film, where he's opposite Greer Garson.

Hmm. Ryan in a schmaltz film with Greer Garson? Thanks! I'll keep an eye out for that one.  Not sure if the library has it.  I'll have to check.

EDIT: No dice at the library.  Seeing that it's MGM, TCM is bound to play it eventually, right? 

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13 hours ago, laffite said:

a greasy gun dealer that is played by a soft-spoken fat man

"Big Ralphie. Big Ralphie is a skel, a gavoon, a real fat slob. He lives in a one room flop. He keeps sewer rats for pets. He's got their cages all Christmas doodad-ed. He's eating pizza with his rats. He skeeve's out Frankie big time. But Ralphie's got contacts. He wants half a G. Frankie says two bills. They compromise on three. Frankie say he'll go him a yard and a half now and the rest on delivery. Ralphie squeals. Frankie throws in another fifty. Deal done."

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Larry Tucker (Big Ralphie) is in Sam Fuller's Transitional Noir Shock Corridor 1963 also and has quite a few writing credits. 

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I also wanted to mention that I watched Robert Ryan in On Dangerous Ground as well. I've also seen Odds Against Tomorrow (which I absolutely loved), Act of Violence, and The Woman on Pier 13 (which was weird. I didn't care for that one as much). 

EDIT: I also recorded The Wild Bunch.  My DVR didn't seem to want to tell me Ryan was in that one when I was searching for Robert Ryan.

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10 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

He's a good guy in The Set-Up, at least. :D

The Set-Up was great.  I also really liked Audrey Totter in this film.

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