Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

John Cusack is a giver of unsolicited armpit licks. 

Google it. 

Also not smart with social media. 

Eww... of all the places to lick.

"Here! Let me taste your sweat!"

Image result for simpsons sweat

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

Heh, never heard of Ruffalo, but looking at his pictures yeah, I think he could pull it off-if he's a good actor too.

Yep, Ruffalo is a pretty good actor.  I first remember seeing him in You Can Count on Me (2000).  He's been nominated for Best Supporting Actor 3 times, for what that's worth.  Lately, he's been cashing in as the Hulk in the Avengers movies. I think Ruffalo could pull off Garfield.  Garfield's life would make an interesting (and sad) movie especially with the HUAC stuff.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

John Cusack is a giver of unsolicited armpit licks. 

Google it. 

Also not smart with social media. 

🤢 I don't know anything about that and I plan on keeping it that way.  Yikes.  I do know that Cusack is political on social media.  I still like Cusack's movies that I mentioned in earlier postings.  I'll just be sure to be more careful googling him in the future.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

I'm just about finished with WILD TOWN ... didn't like the end of THE GETAWAY usually nobody does, lol. .

WILD TOWN was, for me, a very satisfying mystery- and is a rare THOMPSON novel with a non-ambiguous, almost conventional murder-mystery style ending which i liked; and LOU FORD may be THOMPSON'S greatest creation (I especially enjoy how he is two characters- a deliberately ignorant-sounding, folksy Texas lawman when he's dealing with the rubes and an ice-pick smart college boy without any accent or colloqualisms when the "real" him is talking to someone who isn't a hick.

THE ENDING OF THE GETAWAY is such a SADISTIC BUMMER, all the moreso because THE BOOK has the best first thirty pages of any book he EVER wrote. in fact, if THOMPSON HAd just left it a short story about the heist and the sniper and the doublecross, it'd been GREAT.

I remember you or someone else mentioning THE FILM VERSION OF THE KILL-OFF, i'll check for it. the book itself is like a companion piece to WILD TOWn in that it is also a pretty conventionally told murder mystery a la CHRISTIE...only the resolution in it is not satisfying. At all.  it's rather like a spec script for MURDER SHE WROTE.

and spoiler in re THE CRIMINAL- which is a short novel he wrote...

 

you never find out who the killer is at all.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Peebs said:

🤢 I don't know anything about that and I plan on keeping it that way.  Yikes.  I do know that Cusack is political on social media.  I still like Cusack's movies that I mentioned in earlier postings.  I'll just be sure to be more careful googling him in the future.

it's okay, all actors are NUTS!!!!!!!!

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I WILL WATCH anything about vampires up to a certain point in time, not into the recent stuff, but if it's a classic vampire movie- I've seen it or I want to. 

(right down to EL SANTO)

I watched NOSFERATU- the silent version for the 20th time or so. You know, it's weird, it must have something to do with not having spoken lines to relate back to, but every time i see this film, I come across an image or a title card or even a whole scene THAT I DO NOT QUITE RECALL SEEING BEFORE. Great movie tho, 1979 version too. 

(side note- damn SHADOW OF THE VAMPIRE (2000) suuuuuuuuuuuuuuuucks)

I also tried to watch VAMPYR 1932- another GERMAN FILM that it REALLY SEEMS LIKE I OUGHT TO LIKE, BUT DAYUM, I CAN'T MAKE IT THROUGH THIS THING FOR THE LIFE OF ME. I have tried to watch it before and I couldn't make it through...part of the problem are the NUMEROUS title cards, against which I could BARELY READ the english translation at the bottom; also the fact that all the audio and what dialogue there is was OBVIOUSLY ADDED POST PRODUCTION. I mean, PLEASE don't take this the wrong way, but I expect to see a little more innovation and precision from the Germans. Reminded me a bit of CARNIVAL OF SOULS, only I like CARNIVAL OF SOULS.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Didn't you think the sheriff in Pop 1080 was awfully similar in ways to Lou Ford? 

absolutely. THOMPSON uses A LOT OF RECURRING TYPES- and LOU FORD shows up in many ways in many of his other books, also THE TRANSGRESSORS, which is another BIG FAVORITE OF MINE, which is about a MUCH LESS EVIL Sheriff who still, is de facto LOU FORD.

THOMPSON also has a couple of books about traveling salesmen and a few more about BELLBOYS IN HOTELS (which is something he knew a lot about.)

i often have a hard time telling some of his books apart in my mind.

I give him a pass on it for various reasons, although sometimes it does come across as a lazy...the man drank like a fish, so it's entirely possible he forgot he had thought up a scenario or character before.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I WILL WATCH anything about vampires up to a certain point in time, not into the recent stuff, but if it's a classic vampire movie- I've seen it or I want to. 

(right down to EL SANTO)

I watched NOSFERATU- the silent version for the 20th time or so. You know, it's weird, it must have something to do with not having spoken lines to relate back to, but every time i see this film, I come across an image or a title card or even a whole scene THAT I DO NOT QUITE RECALL SEEING BEFORE. Great movie tho, 1979 version too. 

(side note- damn SHADOW OF THE VAMPIRE (2000) suuuuuuuuuuuuuuuucks)

I also tried to watch VAMPYR 1932- another GERMAN FILM that it REALLY SEEMS LIKE I OUGHT TO LIKE, BUT DAYUM, I CAN'T MAKE IT THROUGH THIS THING FOR THE LIFE OF ME. I have tried to watch it before and I couldn't make it through...part of the problem are the NUMEROUS title cards, against which I could BARELY READ the english translation at the bottom; also the fact that all the audio and what dialogue there is was OBVIOUSLY ADDED POST PRODUCTION. I mean, PLEASE don't take this the wrong way, but I expect to see a little more innovation and precision from the Germans. Reminded me a bit of CARNIVAL OF SOULS, only I like CARNIVAL OF SOULS.

Yeah, I like Shadow and the Vampire (7/10).

And I like Vampyr enough (8/10) to rank among my top ten of that year. 

At this point, I can't even begin to guess what a movie that "seems like you ought to like it" would be. 

But you do love Jaws 3-D, so there's that. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought WILLEM DEFOE was UTTERLY BRILLIANT IN SHADOW OF THE VAMPIRE, like, as much as I did not like the movie, if he had won the Oscar for it, I would have been delighted.

looney as this sounds, I wish it had been more of a comedy.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

John Cusack is a giver of unsolicited armpit licks. 

Google it. 

Also not smart with social media. 

That just made that scene from 1996's Flirting with Disaster flash before my eyes again. Cusack wasn't in that film, but Josh Brolin was interested in Patricia Arquette's armpits. That was one quirky film. Mary Tyler Moore stole the whole thing as a neurotic urbanite mama.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, cigarjoe said:

Did you also catch it when it first aired?

No, I didn't. I don't really know why, but I didn't see it or The Man from UNCLE during first-run. And neither was in re-runs on my local stations until the last decade or so, and even then (on MeTV) they were on in the middle of the night. I managed to catch a handful of M:I episodes on MeTV before it left the lineup, but not many. 

I've enjoyed them for the most part so far.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

(side note- damn SHADOW OF THE VAMPIRE (2000) suuuuuuuuuuuuuuuucks)

 

1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Yeah, I like Shadow (of) the Vampire (7/10).

I was suckered by the DVD-cover copy into thinking I was going to watch a historical biopic about FW Murnau and Max Shreck, and How Murnau Boldly Invented German Silent Fantasy-Expressionism, and was able to appreciate John Malkovich's and Willem Dafoe's performances appropriately.  As a film, it may not be a classic, but at least I wasn't holding it to other genre-fanboy demands.

---

And yes, I liked Mission: Impossible S1, even without Peter Graves, and with "Please dispose of this recording in the proper manner".  (Had to watch them on DVD/Amazon, since I never got to stay up as a kid, and only remembered the one later-season episode where they tried to convince the bank robber he'd been cryo'ed into the future.)   

Steven Hill as "Mr. Briggs" came off as more of a cold CIA company-man than Graves' squarejaw-hero, and the genius plots manage to be more diabolically complex than most of what we got in the revolving-door-cast later seasons.  And anyone who only knows the Tom Cruise movies--or even the sequels, apart from the first DePalma one--I prescribe an emergency IV of TV episodes....The movie series went chronic, fast.

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, rayban said:

"Madame DuBarry" - William Dieterle - 1934 -

starring Delores De Rio and Reginald Owen -

It's a gorgeous production -

well-mounted and well-directed -

and vigorously acted by its' ensemble cast -

but this story of King Louis XV and Madame Dubarry -

becomes one of a dirty old man and an empty-headed **** -

if you want your SMUT to look good -

this atrocity is for you -

Dolores Del Rio gives an entirely clueless performance -

she acts like she's won the role of a lifetime -

81L9onS8P+L._SX425_.jpg

You forgot a side plot featuring the future Louis XVI as a kind-hearted nerd. And Anita Louise is my all-time favorite Marie Antoinette.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

The New Adventures of Superman - Season One (1966-1967)

superman-1966_L21.jpg

Animated exploits of the Man of Steel, consisting of 36 stories, each running between 6 and 7 minutes, which were originally paired up with additional Superboy cartoon shorts (which are not included on the DVDs I watched). This has the limited animation style that Filmation was known for, and while it looks awful, it still holds some nostalgic value. The stories are pretty goofy too, mostly dealing with strange aliens or monsters that Superman has to defeat. There are also appearances by Superman's allies Lois Lane, Perry White, and Jimmy Olsen, as well as villains Lex Luthor, The Toyman, The Prankster, Mr. Mxyzptlk, and Brainiac, and original-to-the-series antagonists The Sorcerer and the Warlock.The voice cast includes Bud Collyer as Superman/Clark Kent, Joan Alexander as Lois Lane, Jack Grimes as Jimmy Olsen, and Jackson Beck as the narrator and various other characters. I couldn't help wondering how one episode would be greeted these days, as the villain the Warlock, who practices black magic and name drops Lucifer, uses his powers to animate a giant Civil War statue which rampages across Metropolis. 

Source: Warner DVD

 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/10/2019 at 10:38 AM, speedracer5 said:

Beware My Lovely (1952) 

This was a great noir.  I recorded this Noir Alley back at Christmas time and kept "watching" it, but not really watching it.  So last night, I actually watched this movie without distraction.  Well except for the bird.  He's always distracting.  I only had to rewind a couple times. 

I watched this on TCM a while ago, and both Ryan's and Lupino's characters stood out to me. I'll have to re-watch this sometime soon. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

UP THE DOWN STAIRCASE (1967) *Score: 6/10* 

Starring: Sandy Dennis, Patrick Bedford, Eileen Heckart, Ruth White, Jean Stapleton, Florence Stanley, Roy Poole, Sorrell Booke. 

This film follows young and naive English teacher, Sylvia Barrett at her new job at an urban New York high school. Sylvia is essentially thrown into her new job, and the other jaded teachers find it amusing how happy she is to hold a position at the school. Her main goal is to reach at least one of her students, and to maybe teach how important and beneficial education can be. 

I liked this one for sure. The only performance that stood out to me was Sandy Dennis'. Honestly, I don't think people talk about her enough; I think she was quite talented. Between recently finishing "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf" and watching this one, I have begun to enjoy her films, and would like to seek out more of her work for my viewing pleasure. 

Related image

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I rewatched Alfred Hitchcock’s The Wrong Man(1956). It’s not a traditional Hitch film by any means. It’s a case of mistaken identity for sure but a far more terrifying one. I mean it when I think this movie is scarier than Psycho and The Birds. Think about it. A man walks into a bank and is mistaken for a man who robbed the bank last week. He’s arrested for suspicion of the crime and tries to convince the police he’s innocent. They keep saying that justice will prove him innocent. But it doesn’t. It just gets worse for him(Henry Fonda). 

This is a scenario that could plausibly happen right this moment to anyone. Someone sees you on the street and is convinced that you mugged them last weak and you can’t prove to anyone that you didn’t. Now that is real terror. The idea that you know your innocent, but a case of mistaken identity makes you guilty by default. Powerful stuff. Very underrated Hitchcock movie. 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...