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6 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Sylvia is essentially thrown into her new job, and the other jaded teachers find it amusing how happy she is to hold a position at the school.

Haha, how many movies follow this story line? (think "To Sir With Love") When teaching in an inner city district, it's like wrangling a room full of Dead End Kids. 

I agree though, I like Sandy Dennis' performances. She's a similar type as Julie Harris-a shy, weak gamine who can steel herself if pushed. Both are very good actresses.

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I just got around to watching 2000's DANCER IN THE DARK. I found it searching Bjork at the library and remembered it received excellent reviews.

I couldn't get beyond 20 minutes waiting for the camera to steady itself. Watching an incessantly "shakey" camera gives me a headache. Unwatchable. Too bad, I really wanted to see it.

Dancer_in_the_Dark_(Danish_poster).png

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I too am a fan of Sandy Dennis, despite the fact that many of her post Up the Down Staircase performances are given in the same neurotic, mannered style.  Of course, it worked for most of the roles such as The Out of Towners and The Four Seasons.

Walter Kerr said of a stage performance in 1967 she speaks as though "sentences were poor crippled things that couldn't cross a street without making three false starts from the curb."  What a fabulous description of her speech patterns.

But I most definitely recommend Woody Allen's Another Woman, if only for the confrontation scene between Ms Dennis and Gena Rowlands.

 

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18 hours ago, Peebs said:

Yep, Ruffalo is a pretty good actor.  I first remember seeing him in You Can Count on Me (2000).  He's been nominated for Best Supporting Actor 3 times, for what that's worth.  Lately, he's been cashing in as the Hulk in the Avengers movies. I think Ruffalo could pull off Garfield.  Garfield's life would make an interesting (and sad) movie especially with the HUAC stuff.  

I like Ruffalo too. I've always been intrigued by the Zodiac killer and Ruffalo is one of the stars of the movie. I watch it frequently and he is great in his role. He does look a lot like Garfield. I'm sure he would do a good job if the movie were to happen.

I actually like Cusack as well. I do agree that his portrayal of Brian Wilson was a stretch, but I've enjoyed most of his other movies.

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For those interested in Mark Ruffalo, I would recommend You Can Count On Me (2000), Collateral (2004), Zodiac (2007), Reservation Road (2007), The Brothers Bloom (2009), The Kids Are All Right (2010), Margaret (2011), Foxcatcher (2014), and Spotlight (2015). I also enjoy him as Bruce Banner in the Marvel movies.

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13 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

UP THE DOWN STAIRCASE (1967) *Score: 6/10* 

Starring: Sandy Dennis, Patrick Bedford, Eileen Heckart, Ruth White, Jean Stapleton, Florence Stanley, Roy Poole, Sorrell Booke. 

This film follows young and naive English teacher, Sylvia Barrett at her new job at an urban New York high school. Sylvia is essentially thrown into her new job, and the other jaded teachers find it amusing how happy she is to hold a position at the school. Her main goal is to reach at least one of her students, and to maybe teach how important and beneficial education can be. 

Related image

That was my high school, real name was Rhodes School, that the author of the novel Bel Kaufman taught at for a time. It was only a year or two after she's left that I started going there.

The school was located in two connected buildings (former residences) on West 54th street just off 5th Ave. They overlooked the Museum of Modern Art's courtyard. One building had the "Up" staircase the other the "Down" staircase. It was of course frowned upon to go up the down staircase especially when the class change bell rang.

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2 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

I like Ruffalo too. I've always been intrigued by the Zodiac killer and Ruffalo is one of the stars of the movie. I watch it frequently and he is great in his role. He does look a lot like Garfield. I'm sure he would do a good job if the movie were to happen.

I actually like Cusack as well. I do agree that his portrayal of Brian Wilson was a stretch, but I've enjoyed most of his other movies.

Zodiac is a very good picture but it scared the heck out of me.  Especially creepy was the scene with Jake Gyllenhall in a stranger's remote house interviewing Charles Fleischer about the Zodiac killer.  They are in the basement and you can tell Gyllenhall is getting a bad feeling about this guy and then you hear a noise upstairs.  No ones else is supposed to be home.  Is it the Zodiac? He gets the heck out of there.  Spooky.

I'd like to see Cusack get another good role again.  Maybe a good role in a juicy TV series.   

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Hoganman1:  Have you read "i'll Be Gone in the Dark" by Michelle McNamara?  It's one of those books you can't put down.  It's about the Golden State Killer.  The writer passed away before she finished the book and before they caught the killer.  Patton Oswalt was her husband and he and others helped piece together her notes to finish and promote the book.  I imagine it'll get made in to a movie or mini-series. 

 

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"That Kind Of Woman" - Sidney Lumet - 1959 -

starring Sophia Loren, Tab Hunter, Barbara Nichols, Jack Warden, George Sanders, etc. -

A strange love story about two people who  couldn't be more unlike each other -

she's an older, experienced "kept" woman -

he's an innocent young soldier -

somehow, their mutual attraction gets the better of them -

but, at the same time, she fights it, because she is used to the good life -

and he persists without feeling any real hope for a relationship -

meanwhile, we meet the man who is keeping her -

and her best friend who's attracted to the soldier's best friend -

in the end, there is a "happy ending" -

although it is far from convincing -

the stars play their roles well -

in the midst of an attraction that seems pretty hopeless -

sometimes, it is best to just walk away -

the film failed at the box office -

it is far from a conventional romance -

it's pretty rocky most of the time -

the final image of Tab Hunter and Sophia Loren holding onto each other -

is far from an ecstatic one -

regret seems to be right around the corner -

6151155942_bd33f7af7e_b.jpg

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54 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

That was my high school, real name was Rhodes School, that Bel Kaufman taught at for a time. It was only a year or two after she's left that I started going there.

The school was located in two connected buildings (former residences) on West 54th street just off 5th Ave. They overlooked the Museum of Modern Art's courtyard. One building had the "Up" staircase the other the "Down" staircase. It was of course frowned upon to go up the down staircase especially when the class change bell rang.

Wasn't the famous book by Bel Kaufman a series of school memos?

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6 hours ago, RoyCronin said:

I too am a fan of Sandy Dennis, despite the fact that many of her post Up the Down Staircase performances are given in the same neurotic, mannered style.  Of course, it worked for most of the roles such as The Out of Towners and The Four Seasons.

Walter Kerr said of a stage performance in 1967 she speaks as though "sentences were poor crippled things that couldn't cross a street without making three false starts from the curb."  What a fabulous description of her speech patterns.

But I most definitely recommend Woody Allen's Another Woman, if only for the confrontation scene between Ms Dennis and Gena Rowlands.

 

She gave a less mannered peformance in "The Fox".
 

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2 hours ago, rayban said:

"That Kind Of Woman" - Sidney Lumet - 1959 -

starring Sophia Loren, Tab Hunter, Barbara Nichols, Jack Warden, George Sanders, etc. -

A strange love story about two people who  couldn't be more unlike each other -

she's an older, experienced "kept" woman -

he's an innocent young soldier -

somehow, their mutual attraction gets the better of them -

but, at the same time, she fights it, because she is used to the good life -

and he persists without feeling any real hope for a relationship -

meanwhile, we meet the man who is keeping her -

and her best friend who's attracted to the soldier's best friend -

in the end, there is a "happy ending" -

although it is far from convincing -

the stars play their roles well -

in the midst of an attraction that seems pretty hopeless -

sometimes, it is best to just walk away -

the film failed at the box office -

it is far from a conventional romance -

it's pretty rocky most of the time -

the final image of Tab Hunter and Sophia Loren holding onto each other -

is far from an ecstatic one -

regret seems to be right around the corner -

6151155942_bd33f7af7e_b.jpg

There might be a reason for that. Many publications seemingly took it as a variation on The Shopworn Angel, and tragedy awaited at the end of that film.....

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9 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

... I like Sandy Dennis' performances.

She is letter perfect as Banford in The Fox. Read the D.H. Lawrence's story and if you didn't know better you would think Banford in the book was based on Banford in the movie. Another way saying that she was perfectly cast and she proves it.

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3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

 

(Uh, we get the IDEA, Larry--You've found a new classic rerun to watch, and have started the Teaser-Trailer campaign, with review to follow. 

Just be warned, one more Trek ****-slap .GIF, bereft of any remote understandable context whatsoever, and it'll start to give us dangerous ideas...  😈 )

Edited by TCMModerator1
Edited for Language
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10 hours ago, RoyCronin said:

I too am a fan of Sandy Dennis, despite the fact that many of her post Up the Down Staircase performances are given in the same neurotic, mannered style.  Of course, it worked for most of the roles such as The Out of Towners ...

The Out of Towners didn't work for me. It just seemed overdone and ridiculous. In fact, it is appalling bad. It is so bad that you can't say that it makes the it's so-bad-it-is-good category. It was bad and it stayed bad. One of the few movies about which I would say, how did this ever get released? They must have rushed through the rushes.

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17 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

I watched this [Beware My Lovely (1952)] on TCM a while ago, and both Ryan's and Lupino's characters stood out to me. I'll have to re-watch this sometime soon. 

I'm a real stick in the mud over movies like this. I can't stand them. I'm simply not interested in watching some loony tune jerk threaten, imprison, torture, slash, or do whatever to someone else. My bourgeois attitude (in this case, anyway) pines for escape but I know that we will only be teased with that ad infinitum and it doesn't seem to help to know that it's all going to be all right in the end. I was actually furious with Ida for letting someone in the house like that without knowing who he is. I fantasize scenes that I know won't happen like Ida playing Popeye with the spinach thing and bounce this idiot off the walls. Or some unforeseen superhero jumping through and applying the Moe eye treatment. (Actually they're a lot worse than that). I didn't make it through the movie and I'm glad I didn't. (But Ryan is perfect with this sort of thing and i like him in his patented slightly screw loose type of roles). It's just this particular conceit I don't like. Movies like The Collector and Funny Games fall in this category. Ugh.

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16 hours ago, Casey06 said:

I rewatched Alfred Hitchcock’s The Wrong Man(1956). It’s not a traditional Hitch film by any means. It’s a case of mistaken identity for sure but a far more terrifying one. I mean it when I think this movie is scarier than Psycho and The Birds. Think about it. A man walks into a bank and is mistaken for a man who robbed the bank last week. He’s arrested for suspicion of the crime and tries to convince the police he’s innocent. They keep saying that justice will prove him innocent. But it doesn’t. It just gets worse for him(Henry Fonda). 

This is a scenario that could plausibly happen right this moment to anyone. Someone sees you on the street and is convinced that you mugged them last weak and you can’t prove to anyone that you didn’t. Now that is real terror. The idea that you know your innocent, but a case of mistaken identity makes you guilty by default. Powerful stuff. Very underrated Hitchcock movie. 

You point out all the things that make this such a good film. It's not the usual thriller that normally drives this kind of story. It is so ensconced in everyday reality and does, as you so excellently put it, ask the question (in effect) , how would you really, really, really, feel if this actually happened to you. When Vera Miles throws the glass at him and cuts his face, we have seen something that happens in all kinds of movies, but here we are as shocked as he is.

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1 hour ago, CinemaInternational said:

There might be a reason for that. Many publications seemingly took it as a variation on The Shopworn Angel, and tragedy awaited at the end of that film.....

The whole film plays like a love story in which the two "lovers" should have known better.

Sophia Loren could have stayed with George Sanders.

And Tab Hunter could have visited NYC tourist attractions.

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1 hour ago, EricJ said:

(Uh, we get the IDEA, Larry--You've found a new classic rerun to watch, and have started the Teaser-Trailer campaign, with review to follow. 

Just be warned, one more Trek ****-slap .GIF, bereft of any remote understandable context whatsoever, and it'll start to give us dangerous ideas...  😈 )

I'd suggest removing the massive stick up your ***, but you'll likely need surgical assistance, because that thing is apparently way up in there.

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